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e-Book What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It?: What Archeology Can Tell Us About the Reality of Ancient Israel epub download

e-Book What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It?: What Archeology Can Tell Us About the Reality of Ancient Israel epub download

Author: William G. Dever
ISBN: 080282126X
Pages: 327 pages
Publisher: Eerdmans; Later Printing edition (May 10, 2001)
Language: English
Category: Bible Study & Reference
Size ePUB: 1900 kb
Size Fb2: 1816 kb
Size DJVU: 1669 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 798
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Subcategory: Bibles

e-Book What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It?: What Archeology Can Tell Us About the Reality of Ancient Israel epub download

by William G. Dever



In this fascinating book noted Syro-Palestinian archaeologist William G. Dever attacks the minimalist position head-on, showing how modern archaeology brilliantly illuminates both life in ancient Palestine and the sacred scriptures as we have them today.

In this fascinating book noted Syro-Palestinian archaeologist William G. Assembling a wealth of archaeological evidence, Dever builds the clearest, most complete yet of the "real Israel that existed during the Iron Age of ancient Palestine (1200-600 .

What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It? is a book by biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever detailing his response to the claims of minimalists to the historicity and value of the Hebrew Bible

What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It? is a book by biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever detailing his response to the claims of minimalists to the historicity and value of the Hebrew Bible. Dever's book is a response to recent trends in biblical scholarship and biblical archaeology which question whether the bible can be used as a reliable tool for interpreting history.

The only limits you see are the ones you impose on yourself. What did the biblical writers know and when did they know it? : what archaeology can tell us about. 55 MB·138 Downloads·New!. 02 MB·90 Downloads·New!. What did the biblical writers know and when did they know it?.

This fascinating book by William Dever looks behind the Bible, showing how modern archaeology brilliantly illuminates .

This fascinating book by William Dever looks behind the Bible, showing how modern archaeology brilliantly illuminates both life in ancient Palestine and the sacred scriptures we have them today. Written for general readers but dealing with very real problems in biblical studies, this book brings together a wealth of archaeological evidence to give the clearest picture yet of the "real Israel" that existed during the Iron Age of ancient Palestine (1200-600 . Dever's superb reconstruction of this key period recovers a reliable core history of ancient Israel that provides

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. This book is essentially a polemic against a school of thought which holds that there is nothing of historical value in the Hebrew Bible, since, according to them, these narratives date from the first couple of centuries BCE.

What did the biblical writers know and when did they know it? What archeology can tell us about .

What did the biblical writers know and when did they know it? What archeology can tell us about the reality of ancient Israel. Cambridge: Eerdmans, page 90.

What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did Th: What Archaeology Can Tell Us about the Reality of Ancient Israel: Eerdmans Publishing: 9780802847942: Books

What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did Th: What Archaeology Can Tell Us about the Reality of Ancient Israel: Eerdmans Publishing: 9780802847942: Books -. What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did Th Science & Math What Archaeology Can Tell Us about the Reality of Ancient Israel What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did Th Science & Math What Archaeology Can Tell Us about the Reality of Ancient Israel What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did Th What Archaeology Can Tell Us about the.

Why did the biblical writers think Jezebel such a wicked woman? Such examples could go on and o. The Biblical Tradition under Attack Where does all this leave the intelligent layperson, whether formally religious or not, who wishes simply to understand the Bible better?

Why did the biblical writers think Jezebel such a wicked woman? Such examples could go on and on. Even though I was somewhat surprised, and indeed gratified, to see the public's enthusiasm for the series (I now am recognized when I go to the local barber shop), I became skeptical in the end. The commercial and somewhat cynical exploitation of biblical topics is clearly designed to titillate more than to educate the public. The Biblical Tradition under Attack Where does all this leave the intelligent layperson, whether formally religious or not, who wishes simply to understand the Bible better?

William G. Dever is professor emeritus of Near Eastern archaeology and anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He has served as director of the Nelson Glueck School of Biblical Archaeology in Jerusalem, as director of the .

William G. He has spent 30 years conducting archaeological excavations in the Near East, resulting in a large body of award-winning fieldwork.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 6. 8% restored. Главная What did the biblical writers know and when did they know it? : what archaeology can tell us about th. .

For centuries the Hebrew Bible has been the fountainhead of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Today, however, the entire biblical tradition, including its historical veracity, is being challenged. Leading this assault is a group of scholars described as the "minimalist" or "revisionist" school of biblical studies, which charges that the Hebrew Bible is largely pious fiction, that its writers and editors invented "ancient Israel" as a piece of late Jewish propaganda in the Hellenistic era.In this fascinating book noted Syro-Palestinian archaeologist William G. Dever attacks the minimalist position head-on, showing how modern archaeology brilliantly illuminates both life in ancient Palestine and the sacred scriptures as we have them today. Assembling a wealth of archaeological evidence, Dever builds the clearest, most complete picture yet of the real Israel that existed during the Iron Age of ancient Palestine (1200–600 B.C.).Dever's exceptional reconstruction of this key period points up the minimalists' abuse of archaeology and reveals the weakness of their revisionist histories. Dever shows that ancient Israel, far from being an "invention," is a reality to be discovered. Equally important, his recovery of a reliable core history of ancient Israel provides a firm foundation from which to appreciate the aesthetic value and lofty moral aspirations of the Hebrew Bible.
Kieel
I would like to start by saying I belong to a church that believes in the inerrancy of the Bible. So, Dr. Dever and I start at opposite ends of the spectrum. But I still recommend this book.

First, briefly, the negatives of the book: Dr. Dever is guilty of some of the same errors which he points out among the Middle East revisionist writers he rails against. He makes blatant overstatements (“all archaeologists have..” “most biblical scholars don’t believe..,” etc.) without supporting evidence, but it could be the length of the book prohibited this. He writes about the Documentary Hypothesis (the first five books of the Bible were written by sources know as P, J, E, etc.) as if it is an unquestioned fact, failing to mention this hypothesis has been refuted completely, as the book “The Documentary Hypothesis” by Umberto Cassuto has demonstrated. There are also pages of archaeological technobabble.

But the book is important because Dr. Dever is one of the few scholars of international standing to push back against the revisionist, nihilist, post-modern, deconstructionist writings of what may be termed the “Copenhagen School” of Middle East studies. This group, which fortunately is dwindling in numbers, attempts to erase the early history of Israel, ignoring the archaeological and epigraphic evidence – or calling them forgeries – in order to delegitimize the current Israeli state.

Here’s an example of their writing: Concrete theology as a deconstructive theology must reveal its proper non-presence in the dispersed materiality and violence of inscription, in a dissemination beyond historical univocity or structural polysemy… From “Sign, Text, Scripture – Semiotics and the Bible. You can see this type of nonsense every day when writers try to hide their motives behind meaningless babble or they actually don’t know what they are talking about.

Dr. Dever is arguing against this nonsense and he does a great case in exposing their main goal – delegitimize the Israeli state. Dr. Dever has written several other books, which I plan to read, even though he and I don’t look at the Bible through the same lens.
Kulalbine
Claims about the historical accuracy of the Old Testament as the Hebrew Scriptures are known in the Christian Bible vary from purely mythical to absolutely verbatim historical. The truth of course lies somewhere between these extremes, in so far as Archaeology can determine. The Archaeological record reveals the history of a Bronze Age to Iron Age occupation of the lands by a people and their religious development, but a history that will be disappointing to both the atheist and the evangelical. That the United Kingdom of David and Solomon existed, as well as the divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah is on safe archaeological grounds, but The Pentateuch and the Book of Joshua, at least, appear to be fables with little evidence.

The evidence from Scripture is a story told only from the Priestly side. How religion played out in daily life of the poor, the farmer, is revealed mostly from the archaeological record in conjunction with what the priestly story condemns. The people worshiped The Lord and His Asherah, His consort or wife. We see the condemnation most clearly of the kings of the Northern kingdom by the priests of the Southern kingdom, which confirms that the practice was common enough to be an irritant to the priestly class.

But details that would have only been know by the authors living in the times they wrote date scriptures to the periods claimed, not hundreds of years later - as claimed by some modern denialists - when daily life had changed sufficiently in countless details that authors hundreds of years later could not have gotten right.

If Biblical history of the Middle East interests you, Professor Dever will not disappoint. If you start from a position that the Old Testament is either all myth or all divinely inspired, your assumptions will be vigorously challenged. Read with an open but skeptical balance and allow yourself to be persuaded as to what archaeology can teach you.