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e-Book The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel epub download

e-Book The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel epub download

Author: Katie Ganshert
ISBN: 1601425929
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: WaterBrook (April 21, 2015)
Language: English
Category: Literature & Fiction
Size ePUB: 1150 kb
Size Fb2: 1829 kb
Size DJVU: 1199 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 941
Format: lit mobi rtf lrf
Subcategory: Bibles

e-Book The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel epub download

by Katie Ganshert



Author Katie Ganshert will sweep you into another world in The Art of Losing Yourself

Once again Ganshert holds us spellbound in a beautiful story of endurance and hope-offering no easy answers but the irresistible light of Christ to guide us. And what characters! Real, heartbroken, warm and seeking-within them we meet our friends, our family, ourselves. I thoroughly enjoyed this and, as always, eagerly await her next. Katherine Reay, author of Lizzy & Jane and Dear Mr. Knightley. Author Katie Ganshert will sweep you into another world in The Art of Losing Yourself. I loved this book! The journey Katie’s characters take is raw, beautiful, and honest, and the prose is lovely. Cindy Woodsmall, author of A Love Undone.

The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel. Hating the dull pain in her ankle that served as a reminder of all that had been lost. It hurt worse when it rained, and right then, as she shuffled robotically to the front door, the rain was falling harder, gathering in puddles around Anaya’s car. Marcus stood on the front porch rolling a hat between his hands.

Author Katie Ganshert will sweep you into another world in The Art of Losing Yourself. Katie Ganshert has such a way of tapping into those raw, vulnerable places with her characters, and The Art of Losing Yourself is no exception

Author Katie Ganshert will sweep you into another world in The Art of Losing Yourself. In The Art of Losing Yourself, Katie Ganshert has woven a sensitive story of hope and healing for our modern world. Katie Ganshert has such a way of tapping into those raw, vulnerable places with her characters, and The Art of Losing Yourself is no exception. I love the thread of hope and unabashed honesty weaving through this story of loss and letting go. -Melissa Tagg, author of From the Start.

Katie Ganshert has real talent for creating real stories and characters with emotion and truth

Jan 14, 2015 Chantel rated it it was amazing. Katie Ganshert has real talent for creating real stories and characters with emotion and truth. It was so many times while I was reading this book I felt like I was watching someone's life instead of reading a story. I think The Art of Losing Yourself might just be her best yet. I love this book for so many reasons. It’s honest, raw, truthful, refreshing and hopeful.

KATIE GANSHERT is the award-winning author of several novels and works of short fiction, including the Christy . Author Katie Ganshert will sweep you into another world in The Art of Losing Yourself

KATIE GANSHERT is the award-winning author of several novels and works of short fiction, including the Christy Award-winning books A Broken Kind of Beautiful and Life After, and The Art of Losing Yourself. Katie lives in eastern Iowa with her family.

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Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert (April

Art of Losing Yourself by Katie Ganshert (April. My fabulous friend Katie Ganshert writes beautiful women's fiction! Her new novel, The Art of Losing Yourself just released. The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel by Katie Ganshert I am not a huge fiction reader, though it was great reading in the hospital! It is about learning to be true to yourself and accept your story. Readers who have enjoyed any of Ganshert’s earlier works know that they’re in good hands because she does such a lovely job of tackling serious issues within the context of an emotional story about genuine characters who aren’t afraid to express doubt.

Somehow, my husband got my acerbic sister to smile. She told him she hated football. He laughed, and then they spent the rest of dinner swapping hitchhiking stories. f that he dealt with teenagers every day. He knew how to communicate with them. I spit in the sink, rinsed my mouth, and padded into the bedroom. Ben sat on the edge of the bed fiddling with his phone. My own showed two more missed calls from Natalie. I’d have to remember to call her tomorrow.

Author, Katie Ganshert. Some of my novels include No One Ever Asked, Life After, The Art of Losing Yourself, and The Gifting trilogy. deeper understanding of what it means to live my life for Christ, spending barefooted summers outside with my son, eating chocolate, going to Panera with girlfriends, worshiping, and laughing. She writes some of the best Christian fiction existing; The Art of Losing Yourself: A Novel by Katie Ganshert I am not a huge fiction reader, though it was great reading in the hospital! It is about learning to be true to yourself and accept your story.

Just like in my dream, I was drowning and nobody even noticed.  Every morning, Carmen Hart pastes on her made-for-TV smile and broadcasts the weather. She’s the Florida panhandle’s favorite meteorologist, married to everyone’s favorite high school football coach. They’re the perfect-looking couple, live in a nice house, and attend church on Sundays. From the outside, she’s a woman who has it all together.  But on the inside, Carmen Hart struggles with doubt. She wonders if she made a mistake when she married her husband. She wonders if God is as powerful as she once believed. Sometimes she wonders if He exists at all. After years of secret losses and empty arms, she’s not so sure anymore. Until Carmen’s sister—seventeen year old runaway, Gracie Fisher—steps in and changes everything. Gracie is caught squatting at a boarded-up motel that belongs to Carmen’s aunt, and their mother is off on another one of her benders, which means Carmen has no other option but to take Gracie in. Is it possible for God to use a broken teenager and an abandoned motel to bring a woman’s faith and marriage back to life? Can two half-sisters make each other whole?     — Carol Award: Contemporary Fiction Winner
Bliss
In The Art of Losing Yourself, Katie Ganshert has crafted an interesting story with clearly delineated characters who careen into each other’s stories like orbs in a pinball machine. (And both main characters have cracking-good inciting incidents.) Her characters are relatable, drawing the reader deep into their world. They are drenched with troubles, and every thought and reaction rings with authenticity.

Carmen has endured six miscarriages and is walking wounded. Her teen-aged half-sister Gracie’s been wounded by an alcoholic mother’s neglect. Enduring is a fact of their lives. It’s also a coping strategy. The journey with the women trying to cope with disappointment and to risk trusting again definitely draws you in, but Ganshert brings it so alive that at times you may wish for a breather.

Respite comes from fun, quirky characters and the pithy observations of Aunt Ingrid, the girls’ aunt who loves when she can but disappears into Alzheimer’s fog more and more often. Respite for the reader also comes from Ganshert’s skill with words. The grief she pens is achingly real, but so are the joy, faith, and encouragement that characters offer each other. And beautiful, evocative images such as this: “The clouds were dark purple bruises that stretched to the horizon.” For those who enjoy tales of families forging through messy issues and finding gems amid the tangles, this is a must-read. I'd give it 4 1/2 stars if we could give halves.
Katishi
I must be in the minority here but I really didn't enjoy this book. The two main female characters were not likable. I totally understand that they both had major issues but it just dragged out and they reacted poorly over and over again. Then, all of a sudden, they both have a change of heart and the book just ends....nothing was wrapped up. Nothing. It wasn't even written in a way that you could come up with the ending on your own. I was disappointed and irritated with the whole thing.
Kagaramar
This book will wring your heart out. Such a list of deep topics: alcoholism, abandonment, miscarriages, adoption, lost faith, and faith renewed. Make your favorite hot beverage, grab a blanket, and get to reading. You'll see your own struggles and the struggles of others so very differently after this book. Read it.
Exellent
This book fulfills what I long for from Christian fiction. It was painful (like life), raw (like broken hearts), full of failure (like every day), but in disagreement with other reviews, it was chock FULL of hope at the end. Tidy conclusions make us feel better, but they don't necessarily contribute to strengthening our faith or shoring up our hope in a great and gracious God. The two half-sisters find that their identities and their hopes for life can't be tied up in circumstances, but in the One who does not abandon them even when they doubt Him.
"Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed..." RO 4.18
Nuliax
This is one of those stories that grabs hold and lingers with you. Ganshert engaged my heart and my mind right from the start and held them fast the whole way through. I loved how she wove the tapestry, that is this story together. Showing the hard, painful times; times filled with questions, doubts and fears. Peppered in was grace being woven through, the faithfulness of God orchestrating circumstances and bringing others in to these characters lives to plant seeds, water them and point to Him along the way. Like I said, this is a tapestry so you really don't see the big picture till the end.

I loved this one. This is most definitely not a giddy story. The story is real and honest, and I am so glad I read it. I wish there would have been an epilogue at the end, but otherwise no complaints from me here. Highly recommend this one!
blodrayne
Wish I could give this book 10 stars, it affected me on so many levels. I had read one of the author's earlier works and although "good" I was not that compelled to read another. I'm so glad I gave her another try. I truly cared about these characters which is a sign of a great book. The writing was superb and so "real." I read ALOT of Christian fiction, and find it is so often cliche and not in touch with the "real world." I am so impressed with Ganshert taking on the tough subjects of miscarriage, adoption, dementia, and teen rebellion, and making it all so believable.
Wanenai
Imagine the panic; drowning in a relentless onslaught of waves, unable to reach the one and only lifeline, reliving the horror in nightmares over and over and over again. In more ways than one, Carmen Hart is submerged; in grief, in depression, in futility, and in perspective. Her public self is amazingly flawless; married to a wonderful man, living in a beautiful home and enjoying the job of a lifetime; but on the inside? Carmen is a hollow shell, faith abandoned, and beginning to crumble.

Gracie Fisher is determined to run; away from a mother who cannot stay sober, away from teachers who do not want to understand her and away from a self-inflicted barrage of self-condemnation. When Gracie and Carmen re-unite on the grounds of an old abandoned family motel, they re-discover sisterhood in a way that only God above could orchestrate. Their journey, a dance with many movements and long pauses, includes two men, a beloved aunt and a passage through a "valley of dry bones".

"The Art of Losing Yourself" is not only well written, it demonstrates this author's ability to write stories of significance.
Finally a book that takes characters to hard questions that we all have asked at one point or another. I honestly was not sure how a book with this type of title could be good, but I found myself completely drawn into the characters' lives as they showed such outward strength even as they shattered on the inside. The truths shared in the midst of the hard questions have me wanting to re-read. Thank you, Katie, for writing this book.