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e-Book Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection epub download

e-Book Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection epub download

Author: Pope Benedict XVI
ISBN: 1586176617
Publisher: Ignatius Press (April 1, 2011)
Language: English
Size ePUB: 1702 kb
Size Fb2: 1508 kb
Size DJVU: 1936 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 530
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Subcategory: Bibles

e-Book Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection epub download

by Pope Benedict XVI



Offers a detailed analysis of Jesus Christ's final week in Jerusalem, examining the political, religious and scholarly aspects of Jesus' life, teaching, death and resurrection.

by. Joseph Ratzinger. At last I am able to present to the public Part Two of my book on Jesus of Nazareth

by. Pope Benedict XVI. English translation provided by the. Vatican Secretariat of State. At last I am able to present to the public Part Two of my book on Jesus of Nazareth. In view of the predictable variety of reactions to Part One, it has been a source of great encouragement to me that such leading exegetes as Martin Hengel (who sadly has since passed away), Peter Stuhlmacher, and Franz Mussner have strongly confirmed me in my desire to continue my work and to complete the task I had begun.

Jesus of Nazareth is the writing on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ by Pope Benedict XVI, published in three volumes. The first volume, Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration, was authored by Benedict following his ascension to the papacy. It was published by Doubleday in 2007

Pope Benedict XVI"Working from Scripture, the Church Fathers and contemporary scholarship, Bened

Pope Benedict XVI"Working from Scripture, the Church Fathers and contemporary scholarship, Bened. Benedict XVI presents this challenge in his new book, Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection, the sequel volume to Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration. Why was Jesus rejected by the religious leaders of his day? Who was responsible for his death?

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI, was born at Marktl am Inn, Diocese of Passau (Germany), on Holy Saturday, April 16, 1927. He was baptized on the same day. He received his priestly ordination on June 29, 1951.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI, was born at Marktl am Inn, Diocese of Passau (Germany), on Holy Saturday, April 16, 1927. He became Archbishop of Munich and Freising in 1977, and Pope Paul VI made him a cardinal in June of that same year. The Venerable Pope John Paul II approved Cardinal Ratzinger's election as Dean of the College of Cardinals in 2002. As such, he presided over John Paul II's funeral ceremonies in 2005, and convened the conclave to elect his successor 10 days later.

Benedict XVI presents this challenge in his new book, Jesus of Nazareth: From His Transfiguration Through His .

Benedict XVI presents this challenge in his new book, Jesus of Nazareth: From His Transfiguration Through His Death and Resurrection, the sequel volume to Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration. So here I am with Pope Benedict's second Jesus of Nazareth book, marveling again at how lucid it is, how erudite, and REREAD Despite what I said the first time around (below) I have not gone back to this repeatedly. Partly because it is such demanding reading (one must pay attention!) and partly because there was always some other shiny new book I wanted to read.

The Massive Heresies in Benedict XVI’s 2011 Book Jesus of Nazareth – Holy Week. By Bro. Peter Dimond. This is from my continuing study of Benedict XVI’s books. For those who don’t know, Benedict XVI is Joseph Ratzinger. Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth – Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection, 2011, p. 46: Moreover, we have seen that the nucleus of Jesus’ eschatological message includes the proclamation of an age of the nations, during which the Gospel must be brought to the whole world and to all people: only then can history attain its goal.

by Pope Benedict XV.

In the end only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you lived, and how gracefully you let go of things not meant for you. ― Anonymous. How to Write a Business Plan. 02 MB·284,594 Downloads. Prepare cash flow and profit & loss forecasts.

In 2007 Joseph Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI published the first volume of Jesus of Nazareth not just as a devotional . The critics took exception to the book's rejection of the principal finding of the historical-critical school: the distinction between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith.

The critics took exception to the book's rejection of the principal finding of the historical-critical school: the distinction between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith. Ratzinger, they asserted, followed methodological rules only if they suited his theological preconceptions.

8 CDs, read by Matthew Arnold

For Christians, Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, who died for the sins of the world, and who rose from the dead in triumph over sin and death. For non-Christians, he is almost anything else-a myth, a political revolutionary, a prophet whose teaching was misunderstood or distorted by his followers.

Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, and no myth, revolutionary, or misunderstood prophet, insists Benedict XVI. He thinks that the best of historical scholarship, while it can't "prove" Jesus is the Son of God, certainly doesn't disprove it. Indeed, Benedict maintains that the evidence, fairly considered, brings us face-to-face with the challenge of Jesus-a real man who taught and acted in ways that were tantamount to claims of divine authority, claims not easily dismissed as lunacy or deception.

Benedict XVI presents this challenge in his new book, Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection, the sequel volume to Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration.

Why was Jesus rejected by the religious leaders of his day? Who was responsible for his death? Did he establish a Church to carry on his work? How did Jesus view his suffering and death? How should we? And, most importantly, did Jesus really rise from the dead and what does his resurrection mean? The story of Jesus raises many crucial questions.

Benedict brings to his study the vast learning of a brilliant scholar, the passionate searching of a great mind, and the deep compassion of a pastor's heart. In the end, he dares readers to grapple with the meaning of Jesus' life, teaching, death, and resurrection.

Diredefender
"Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem To The Resurrection" is the sequel to Pope Benedicts XVI's first book on the life of Christ: "Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration." What I am writing, I write as an Anglican priest and professor who has read previously only a few articles by Pope Benedict XVI (back when he was Cardinal Ratzinger). I'm happy to say that I find Benedict XVI's "Jesus of Nazareth" a wonderful commentary on the life of Jesus Christ. While it's very clear that the Pope is a scholar, it's also clear he is a man of deep faith: I want both of these in a good commentary on the life of Christ! This Volume 2 of the Pope's work makes me want to go out and buy his first volume as well. "Jesus of Nazareth", especially, makes for wonderful Lent, Passiontide, and Eastertide reading!

I heartily recommend "Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem To The Resurrection" to all Christians who want to understand Jesus and His teachings better, to be closer to Jesus Christ, and to become more faithful disciples of His in the process. Any writer who manages to combine scholarly erudition with readability and deep insights into faith and theology deserves to be read. This is especially true if the writer is the present Pope!

In his forward, Benedict places his work, and that of scholarly exegesis in general, firmly in its theological context, as a response to the historical-critical exegesis that is even now exhausting itself. In other words, his work will combine the scholar's care for history with the saint's devotion to and care for the biblical text. Benedict says that he is not writing another "life of Christ" but wants simply to present the figure and message of Jesus.

When reviewing books, especially ones of a theological nature, I like to look at both the most difficult passages to see if the author will "wimp out" on the reader and to look at the most dense and important passages. Benedict states that the teachings of Jesus on eschatology near the end of the Gospels can be described as "the most difficult text in the whole of the Gospels?" So how does the Pope handle these difficult passages? With great skill and understanding. In essence, he looks at these passages through three temporal lenses. First, he sees them as being in continuity with the tradition that came before. Second, he sees a historical fulfillment in the destruction of the Temple.
Third, he sees them in terms of an eschatology that is beyond our time and reality. I believe this is a faithful way to understand these difficult passages and may be of great help to perplexed Christians. Rather than seeing a naïve and simplistic connection between Jesus' teaching and the end of the world, Benedict sees in them as well "a time for the Gentiles."

Being an Anglican, and not a Roman Catholic, I wanted to see how Benedict would handle "the theology of the words of institution." Benedict begins with a helpful reminder that the words of institution belong in the context of prayer, "the thanksgiving that leads to blessing and to transformation." In the breaking of the bread, we see the hospitality and caring of God that is to be applied in the caring nature of God's Church as well. Protestants may not be satisfied with Benedict's explanation of how Christ can say "This is My Body" while He is still standing there in the flesh, but Benedict expresses Jesus' meaning without being polemical. In essence, by way of anticipation, Jesus knows that He will indeed offer His life to His disciples and is already in the process of doing it. Nothing very controversial here for many of us.

On a more personal and less theological level, I find that in many places Benedict's insights not only helped me to understand certain passages better but also to know their deeper meanings. He does a wonderful job of showing how various passages of the Bible all are brought together in parts of the life of Christ (and some of you thought Roman Catholics don't know their Bible!) For example, I love Benedict's discussion of Jesus' passionate prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane. Even here, Benedict always keeps the relevant scholarship before, as a means of better understanding the passage at hand.

There are too many other important passages to go through, but I thought Benedict's handling of Christ' cry of dereliction on the Cross was very good, placing it, as he does, in the context of what has been called the "corporate personality" of the Psalms. This is in contrast to the individualistic way we tend to read the Scriptures. In other words, Benedict allows for the importance of private piety but always ties them to the life of Christ and therefore the life of the whole Church.

In summary, what we have in Pope Benedict XVI's "Jesus of Nazareth" is an explanation of the most important man who brought the most important message. It just happens to be written by, arguably, the most important (though all are equal in God's eyes) Christian alive today. Intelligent and clear, faithful and forceful, I'm sure it will bless the lives of many! My prayer is that "Jesus of Nazareth" will bring many Christians closer to Jesus of Nazareth.

Benedict XVI organizes his book in the following way:

I. The Entrance into Jerusalem and the Cleansing of the Temple
1. The Entrance into Jerusalem
2. The Cleansing of the Temple

II. Jesus' Eschatological Discourse
1. The End of the Temple
2. The Times of the Gentiles
3. Prophecy and Apocalyptic in the Eschatological Discourse

III. The Washing of the Feet
1. The Hour of Jesus
2. "You are Clean"
3. The New Commandment
4. The Mystery of the Betrayer
5. Two Conversations with Peter
6. Washing of Feet and Confession of Sin

IV. Jesus' High Priestly Prayer
1. The Jewish Feast of the Atonement
2. Four Major Themes of the Prayer

V. The Last Supper
1. The Dating of the Last Supper
2. The Institution of the Eucharist
3. The Theology of the Words of Institution
4. From the Last Supper to the Sunday Morning Eucharist

VI. Gethsemane
1. On the Way to the Mount of Olives
2. The Prayer of Jesus

VII. The Trial of Jesus
1. Preliminary Discussion of the Sanhedrin
2. Jesus Before the Sanhedrin
3. Jesus Before Pilate

VIII. Crucifixion and Burial of Jesus
1. Word and Event in the Passion Narrative
2. Jesus on the Cross (this is subdivided into 8 sections)
3. Jesus' Death as Reconciliation and Salvation

IX. Jesus' Resurrection from the Dead
1. What is the Resurrection of Jesus?
2. The 2 Different Types of Resurrection Testimony
- the Confessional Tradition
- the Narrative Tradition
3. Summary: the Nature of Jesus' Resurrection and its Historical Significance

Epilogue - "He Ascended into Heaven"
Huston
In Pope Benedict XVI's second volume of "Jesus of Nazareth" the Pope continues to explore the life of Jesus. This time it is from Jesus' entrance into Jerusalem until the time of his Resurrection. His purpose for writing the book is stated in the introduction, when he says, "I have attempted to develop a way of observing and listening to the Jesus of the Gospels that can indeed lead to personal encounter and that, through collective listening with Jesus' disciples across the ages, can indeed attain sure knowledge of the real historical figure of Jesus."

This encounter with Jesus is achieved through a unique analysis of the Biblical text. Benedict is trying to change the way in which Biblical scholars and theologians dive into the text and help shift Biblical studies toward a more intimate portrayal of Christ.

The current state of biblical studies in most of Christianity is still heavily dependent upon the historical-critical method of study. This method is really a compilation of various methods of trying to look into the past to examine the Biblical text in light of what we know about them during the time they were written. It tries to understand, as best as can be done, what the human authors of Scripture understood about the world, culture, themselves, God, etc. to draw out the meaning of the text.

Benedict XVI stated in volume I that the method is limited in what it can do for us, because it remains a method which leaves "the biblical word in the past". It also does not approach the text with the eyes of faith, but with a critical eye. This means that it is very limited in the scope of what it can do for us and it cannot bring us to a real encounter with a God who comes to us as a Living Word today.

Because of these limitations inherent to the historical-critical method, the Pope believes it has "yielded its essential fruit", even while it is indispensably helpful for a study of the Bible.

With this in mind, Benedict sets out to help us see the historical figure of Christ through the eyes of faith. This faith should be informed by the historicity of the Gospels, but never devoid of seeing Christ as He should properly be seen - not merely a figure of the past, but someone who is alive and present to us today. This takes faith.

While I believe the Pope achieved his goal, to a certain extent, in the first volume. I also believe he has done a better job of drawing us toward the face of Christ in the second volume. This is a great challenge, because so many things have already been written through the centuries about Jesus, as He is described in the Gospels. But, this unique approach of bringing together the wisdom of the Church's study of the Bible alongside a faithful and intimate portrait of Christ is a real achievement.

In addition to bringing about this new way of reading the Gospels, Benedict hasn't avoided the tough questions that arise when we read the Gospel accounts of Christ's life. He directly answers them and his answers are lucid and his style of writing will be readable for most people. One of the best sections is Chapter 4 - The High Priestly Prayer. In this chapter Benedict gives insights which opened up new horizons to me in understanding this difficult part of John's Gospel.

I have been blessed to a large number of Benedict's writings, but during his time as Pope and before. This is one of the best of the bunch.