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e-Book Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims epub download

e-Book Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims epub download

Author: Daniel R. Hyde
ISBN: 1567692036
Pages: 154 pages
Publisher: Reformation Trust Publishing (March 17, 2010)
Language: English
Category: Theology
Size ePUB: 1423 kb
Size Fb2: 1202 kb
Size DJVU: 1660 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 838
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Subcategory: Bibles

e-Book Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims epub download

by Daniel R. Hyde



Welcome to a Reformed Church is a superb introduction to ecclesiology and Reformed theology. Daniel Hyde clearly describes the history and tenets of a church that stands in the Reformation stream

Welcome to a Reformed Church is a superb introduction to ecclesiology and Reformed theology. Daniel Hyde clearly describes the history and tenets of a church that stands in the Reformation stream. The author provides the context for the Reformation and walks readers through the confessional history of the Reformed church. Hyde summarizes the sola's of the Reformation (sola gratia, sola fide, sola Christus, Sola Scriptura, and Soli Deo gloria). Additionally, the author skillfully explains critical doctrines such as justification by faith and sanctification.

Welcome to a Reformed Church book. Daniel R. Hyde, a pastor of a Reformed church

Welcome to a Reformed Church book. Who are these guys? That was the question the teenage. Hyde, a pastor of a Reformed church. Recognizing that many are on the outside looking in, just as he once was, he wrote Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims to explain what Reformed churches believe and why they structure their life and worship as they do. In layman s terms, Rev. Hyde sketches the historical roots of the Reformed churches, their scriptural and confessional basis, their key beliefs, and the ways in which those beliefs are put into practice.

In his new book, Welcome to a Reformed Church, Daniel R. Hyde sketches the historical roots of Reformed . Daniel Hyde has written an invaluable road map for pilgrims new and old so they can know what Reformed churches believe and why. Hyde sketches the historical roots of Reformed churches, their scriptural and confessional basis, their key beliefs, and the ways in which those beliefs are put into practice. The result is a roadmap for those encountering the Reformed world for the first time and a primer for those who want to know more about their Reformed heritage.

Daniel R. Recognizing that many are on the outside looking in, just as he once was, he wrote Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrimsto explain what Reformed churches believe and why they structure their life and worship as they do. In layman’s terms, Rev.

That was the question the teenage Daniel R. Hyde posed to his father when he first encountered Reformed believers. This book is written in a popular, conversational style

This book is written in a popular, conversational style. It sketches the historical roots of Reformed churches, their scriptural and confessional basis, their key beliefs, and the ways in which those beliefs are put into practice. The result is a roamap for those encountering Reformed churches for the first time.

Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims. Written by Daniel R. Hyde. Narrated by David Cochran Heath.

Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims, Author: Daniel Hyde, Publisher: Reformation . That was the question the teenage Daniel R. Hyde posed to his father when he first encountered Reformed believers

Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims, Author: Daniel Hyde, Publisher: Reformation Trust (a ministry of Ligonier Ministries) (2010). With their unique beliefs and practices, these Christians didn’t fit any of the categories in his mind. Not so many years later, Hyde is now Rev.

In this book Daniel Hyde sketches the historical roots. In this book Daniel Hyde sketches the historical roots. Heidelberg Reformation Association

Written by Daniel R. Hyde, Audiobook narrated by David Cochran Heath. Welcome to a Reformed Church. A Guide for Pilgrims.

Written by Daniel R. Narrated by: David Cochran Heath. Length: 4 hrs and 33 mins. Hyde, a pastor of a Reformed church

Daniel R. Recognizing that many are on the outside looking in, just as he once was, he wrote Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims to explain what Reformed churches believe and why they structure their lives and worship as they do. In layman's terms Rev. Hyde sketches the historical roots of the Reformed churches, their scriptural and confessional basis, their key beliefs, and the ways in which those beliefs are put into practice

Who are these guys? That was the question the teenage Daniel R. Hyde posed to his father when he first encountered Reformed believers. With their unique beliefs and practices, these Christians didn't fit any of the categories in his mind. Not so many years later, Hyde is now Rev. Daniel R. Hyde, a pastor of a Reformed church. Recognizing that many are on the outside looking in, just as he once was, he wrote Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims to explain what Reformed churches believe and why they structure their life and worship as they do. In layman's terms, Rev. Hyde sketches the historical roots of the Reformed churches, their scriptural and confessional basis, their key beliefs, and the ways in which those beliefs are put into practice. The result is a roadmap for those encountering the Reformed world for the first time and a primer for those who want to know more about their Reformed heritage.
Bliss
It's a good book. One of the ways I can tell is the highlighting I did in my Kindle version. There was a fair amount to said highlighting. As the title suggests, it is targeted to a reader who is unfamiliar with the Reformed Tradition and seeking information. Would say it serves that purpose well. That said, it felt to me like it would not necessarily be a good starting point for a person who is young in the Christian faith as it seemed to be to get a little bit wonky in a few places. I actually enjoyed some of those details, but some might find it a bit tedious.

The point is definitely hammered home that the Reformed Tradition is both Biblical and Confessional, as there are very frequent quotations from the historic confessions most associated with Reformed theology. I enjoyed the book.
Zorve
Welcome to a Reformed Church is a superb introduction to ecclesiology and Reformed theology. Daniel Hyde clearly describes the history and tenets of a church that stands in the Reformation stream.

The author provides the context for the Reformation and walks readers through the confessional history of the Reformed church. Hyde summarizes the sola's of the Reformation (sola gratia, sola fide, sola Christus, Sola Scriptura, and Soli Deo gloria). Additionally, the author skillfully explains critical doctrines such as justification by faith and sanctification.

Hyde discusses the distinguishing marks of a reformed church, namely, faithful preaching, the administration of the two ordinances, and church discipline.

While the book proves valuable, I have personal qualms with a few of the positions that are typical proclaimed as Reformed. First, infant baptism is promoted, a view that does not have biblical support. Second, the author endorses the so-called Regulative Principle, the view that maintains Christians ought to worship God "in the manner he has commanded us in his Word." On face value, this view seems credible. Who would promote a view that embraces anything other than what God has commanded? The problem here appears to be a cultural issue. For example, reformed thinkers would be mistaken to marginalize what Sovereign Grace ministries is accomplishing. Reformed theology and contemporary God-centered worship is difficult to argue with! Clearly, these are debatable matters that can be discussed in a thoughtful and civil way.

Overall, Welcome to a Reformed Church is a worthwhile read.

Semper Reformanda!
Onnell
The author presents the fundamental tenets of the Reformed Church very well. As someone who ministers to and interacts with persons of all faiths and denominations on a regular basis, it was just what I was looking for to broaden my understandings a bit. Some of it is tough because I don't know all the ins and outs of the lingo the way the author or the Reformed church itself does, but I was still able to get what I needed out of it. And without feeling like I was being preached to or trying to be converted. Thanks for that! The welcome was evident.
EXIBUZYW
Hyde, Daniel R.. Welcome to a Reformed Church: A Guide for Pilgrims. Orlando, Fla.: Reformation Trust Pub., 2010. Print.
Rev. Hyde offers readers a primer on the history and doctrine of the Reformed Church, focusing mainly on the 3 Forms of Unity (Belgic Confession, Heidelberg Catechism, and Canons of Dordt).

The Good:

Although a Reformed Evangelical Baptist, I am indebted to the 3 forms more than any other confession, catechism, or doctrinal formulation. I welcome with joy this brief book which introduces many to a heritage that is little-known in the broader American Evangelical Church.
Rev. Hyde takes great care to represent Reformed theology as a religion of the heart and mind. Hyde states,
"God has established an inseparable connection between truth and godliness. If truth remains in our heads but does not proceed to dwell in our hearts and find expression in our conduct, then we are no different, James says, than the devils (James 2:18-19)."
Many have criticized Reformed theology as being arrogant and cerebral. While there are some who may unfortunately represent the Reformed heritage in such a way, this certainly is unrepresentative of the whole. Hyde commends Scottish Presbyterian John "Rabbi" Duncan's quote, "I'm first a Christian, next a Catholic, then a Calvinist, fourth a Paedobaptist and finally a Presbyterian. I cannot reverse the order." Hyde reminds us that we are first Christians, and secondly catholics. Catholic in the sense that we affirm solidarity with the church behind us, the church around us, and the church ahead of us.
Hyde also reminds us that Reformed theology highlights the importance of Sanctification. While many may first think of God's sovereignty and Justification as key Reformed doctrines, the Reformers cared just as much about holy living. Hyde notes:
"Our Reformed fathers focused heavily on holy living. The volume of teachings they devoted to sanctification in their confessions and catechisms is striking. The Heidelberg Catechism devotes forty-four of its 129 questions and answers, more than one-third of its material, to sanctification, while the Westminster Larger Catechism devotes an impressive eighty-two of 196 questions and answers (42 percent) to this subject. By this emphasis, the Reformed churches declared that Calvinism is no mere religion of "head knowledge," and we cannot live as if it makes us the "frozen chosen," as we are sometimes derisively known. It is a religion of head and heart."
The last emphasis that I found helpful was Hyde's treatment of the Church and the centrality of the means of grace through Word and Sacraments. He reminds us that,
"It is the preaching of the gospel of Jesus Christ, then, that creates the people of God. The gospel not only saves us from our sins and the wrath of God, it places us in vital union with Jesus Christ and other Christians. Thus, the church is the fruit of the gospel; it is not our own creation, but a creation of the triune God of grace."

The Bad:

The only disappointment I had was Hyde's neglect of the Reformed Baptist heritage in its 1644 and 1689 confessions. Perhaps Hyde doesn't acknowledge the London Baptist confession as representative of what constitutes a "Reformed Church". He does however make mention of the likes of William Carey and Adoniram Judson when citing Reformed involvement in Missions. I certainly hope that Hyde's neglect of the Reformed Baptist heritage, even in brief, was due to the focus of his work and need to redact accordingly. If, however, he doesn't view the Reformed Baptist confession as part of the "Reformed Church", then he should also not list Baptist missionaries in his effort to defend Reformed Theology against the attack that missions is neglected in such circles. You can't have it both ways Rev. Hyde. If even you added a paragraph to mention the Reformed Baptist confessions, you would at least have been free from the perception that you selectively mention Baptist missionaries, while seemingly not viewing Baptists as "Reformed" in your broader historical treatment.

The Bottom Line:

Rev. Hyde does us all a great service in this book, which serves as a great primer to the great confessional heritage of the Reformed Church. He corrects common stereotypes that Reformed folk are uptight prudes who care only about how one thinks about God. The fact is that the Heidelberg Catechism was written and affirmed by folks whose lives were on the line, thus manifesting a piety that involved firm convictions of mind AND heart.
Hyde was once a Pentecostal, who was turned on to the 5 points of Calvinism by a Pentecostal College professor, who he remains somewhat indebted to. My story is very similar. Where our stories vary is that Hyde has found refuge in a rich confessional tradition, whereas I have learned from the confessions a great deal, but remain an Evangelical. I happen to subscribe to the 3 Forms with a few minor adjustments. I see myself a product of the confessional tradition, but remain a Reformed-minded Evangelical. In this sense, I think I heed "Rabbi" Duncan's words (with the following revision):
"I'm first a Christian, next an Evangelical, then a Calvinist, fourth a Covenantal Baptist and finally an Anglican (liturgy and partly ecclesiology). I cannot reverse the order."
Blueshaper
As a URC pastor using this book for our new member's class, I have found it to be a very helpful tool for guiding discussions with prospective members. I would highly recommend it to anyone desiring to learn more about the Reformed faith as a complement to meeting in person with a pastor or elder of a Reformed church to discuss the material along with any questions that may come up.
Pryl
Wonderfully broad work in the sense that it covers the reformed doctrines generally taught in traditionally reformed Churches. Not for the young in the faith however. Would not recommend for a discipleship tool. Almost better for someone who has been exposed to a period of learning prior. I enjoyed it as a comprehensive refresher.