» » Lilla's Feast: A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient
e-Book Lilla's Feast: A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient epub download

e-Book Lilla's Feast: A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient epub download

Author: Frances Osborne
ISBN: 0345467000
Pages: 304 pages
Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1st Edition, 1st Printing edition (September 28, 2004)
Language: English
Category: Historical
Size ePUB: 1558 kb
Size Fb2: 1788 kb
Size DJVU: 1976 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 951
Format: lrf azw docx lit
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Lilla's Feast: A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient epub download

by Frances Osborne



At the end of her life, Frances Osborne’s great-grandmother Lilla was as elegant as. .

At the end of her life, Frances Osborne’s great-grandmother Lilla was as elegant as ever–all fitted black lace and sparkling-white diamonds. To her great-grandchildren, Lilla was both an ally and a mysterious wonder. Her bedroom was filled with treasures from every exotic corner of the world. In the world this magical food journal, now housed in the Imperial War Museum in London, everyone is warm and safe in their homes, and the pages are filled with cream puffs, butterscotch, and comforting soup. In its writing, Lilla was able to transform the darkest moments into scrumptious escape.

Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lilla's Feast: A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lilla's Feast: One Woman's True Story of Love and War in the Orient. Beneath its polished surface, Lilla’s life had been anything but effortless. Born in 1882 to English parents in the beautiful North China port city of Chefoo, Lilla was an identical twin

Lilla's Feast: One Woman's True Story of Love and War in the Orient. Born in 1882 to English parents in the beautiful North China port city of Chefoo, Lilla was an identical twin. Growing up, she knew both great privilege and deprivation, love and its absence. But the one constant was a deep appreciation for the power of food and place. From the noodles of Shanghai to the chutney of British India and the roasts of England, good food and sensuous surroundings, Lilla was raised to believe, could carry one a long way toward happiness.

LILLA'S FEAST A True Story of Food, Love, and War in the Orient. 280 pp. Ballantine Books. SOME people have all the history.

I loved LILLA'S FEAST - absolutely absorbing, both for its historical . LILLA'S FEAST is a wonderful, inspiring book

I loved LILLA'S FEAST - absolutely absorbing, both for its historical content and its personal details. I felt for Lilla, every step of the way. a real feeling for place fills this book. Margaret Forster, author of Lady’s Maid, Daphne Du Maurier, and Georgie Girl. LILLA'S FEAST is a wonderful, inspiring book. Part page-turner, part history of the British Empire in the Far East, Frances Osborne perfectly captures the stories of a lost generation of women.

Электронная книга "Lilla's Feast: One Woman's True Story of Love and War in the Orient", Frances Osborne. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Lilla's Feast: One Woman's True Story of Love and War in the Orient" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

LILLA'S FEAST is a wonderful, inspiring book. It is impossible to read this book without admiring the brave adventurers who risked everything, were tested almost beyond endurance, and yet remained proud and strong to the end. -Amanda Foreman, author of GEORGIANA. Passionately written and compelling, Frances Osborne's impressive debut is a wonderful read.

Lilla’s remarkable cookbook, which she composed while on the brink of starvation .

Lilla’s remarkable cookbook, which she composed while on the brink of starvation, makes no mention of wartime rations, of rotten vegetables and donkey meat. She is the author of Lilla’s Feast and The Bolter.

Lilla's Feast" describes a time not so very long ago that seems impossibly distant. During the imprisonment Lilla dreamed of food. In her mind she composed a cookbook. The world-wide expansion of European colonialism in the 19th century caused thousands of people, especially British, to seek their fortunes in the colonies and the trading emporiums in the exotic East, especially India and China. Lilla, the great-grandmother of the author was one of them.

At the end of her life, Frances Osborne’s one-hundred-year-old great-grandmother Lilla was as elegant as ever–all fitted black lace and sparkling-white diamonds. To her great-grandchildren, Lilla was both an ally and a mysterious wonder. Her bedroom was filled with treasures from every exotic corner of the world. But she rarely mentioned the Japanese prison camps in which she spent much of World War II, or the elaborate cookbook she wrote to help her survive behind the barbed wire. Beneath its polished surface, Lilla’s life had been anything but effortless. Born in 1882 to English parents in the beautiful North China port city of Chefoo, Lilla was an identical twin. Growing up, she knew both great privilege and deprivation, love and its absence. But the one constant was a deep appreciation for the power of food and place. From the noodles of Shanghai to the chutney of British India and the roasts of England, good food and sensuous surroundings, Lilla was raised to believe, could carry one a long way toward happiness. Her story is brimming with the stuff of good fiction: distant locales, an improvident marriage, an evil mother-in-law, a dramatic suicide, and two world wars.Lilla’s remarkable cookbook, which she composed while on the brink of starvation, makes no mention of wartime rations, of rotten vegetables and donkey meat. In the world this magical food journal, now housed in the Imperial War Museum in London, everyone is warm and safe in their homes, and the pages are filled with cream puffs, butterscotch, and comforting soup. In its writing, Lilla was able to transform the darkest moments into scrumptious escape.Lilla’s Feast is a rich evocation of a bygone world, the inspiring story of an ordinary woman who tackled the challenges life threw in her path with an extraordinary determination.
Yozshubei
Fascinating story of a woman's life, excellently written.
godlike
A loving tribute to a great-grandmother I would have liked to have met, but who lived a life I'm glad I skipped.

Born in China in 1882, she lived in China, India and England during times of great change. No longer young, she and her husband were imprisoned by the Japanese during World War II. During the imprisonment Lilla dreamed of food. In her mind she composed a cookbook. A cookbook that is today in the Imperial War Museum in London. It's a cookbook of traditional foods, of oriental foods, a cookbook of dreams to replace the starvation in the camp.

The book is a biography of Lilla, but more than that it is a picture of a time long past that is forever gone. Besides the cookbook and family records, Ms. Osborne draws on newspaper clippings and other historical information to give a picture of life in those times, in those places. It makes for fascinating reading.
Unereel
But I for one was not. The book is steeped in a bias towards colonialism. The tone of the book encourages the reader to think of the Chinese, Japanese, and Indians as faceless "others" surrounding the more civilised and elegant British and European populations, only to be depicted in elementary-school-textbook-like passages about historical events.

Although the author's inclination to view her great-grandmother as a victim of nearly everyone and everything (fate as well!)is certainly understandable, it hardly makes for captivating reading. The writing style is a dry mix of "facts" derived from personal effects and sheer speculation.

This book is based upon a recipe book which was donated to a British museum.... as opposed to the priceless artifacts which Britain so self-righteously helped itself to during it's tyrannical episode of colonization... and still doesn't feel the need to return.

I suppose it's hardly possible to expect an unbiased view of colonization from the wife of the youngest conservative member of Parliament, but one can hope.
Cordanius
What a wonderful, well researched story of a time gone by and a woman who refused to let truly terrible expereinces wreck her spirit. Bravo to Ms. Osborne for telling her great-grandmother's story so well and so lovingly.