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e-Book Priestblock 25487: A Memior of Dachau epub download

e-Book Priestblock 25487: A Memior of Dachau epub download

Author: Mr. Jean Bernard
ISBN: 0972598170
Pages: 177 pages
Publisher: Zaccheus Press (October 28, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Historical
Size ePUB: 1119 kb
Size Fb2: 1705 kb
Size DJVU: 1946 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 717
Format: mbr mobi docx doc
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Priestblock 25487: A Memior of Dachau epub download

by Mr. Jean Bernard



Fascinating book about the many priests and religious Evangelists who were locked away in concentration blocks as well.

Fascinating book about the many priests and religious Evangelists who were locked away in concentration blocks as well. Having lived in Germany for 13 years, have visited Dachau and saw the horrible dormitories and crematories and the famous sign above the entrance: "Arbeit Macht Uns Frei" "Work Makes Us Free. While 6 million Jews were murdered, 9 million people died, including Gypsies, Romanians, Religious professionals, Nuns, and many others who would not look the oth er way.

Priestblock 25487 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Priestblock 25487: a Memoir of Dachau as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Priestblock 25487: A Memoir of Dachau.

Father Jean Bernard (13 August 1907 – 1 September 1994) was a Catholic priest from Luxembourg who was imprisoned from May 1941 to August 1942 in the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau. He was released for nine days in February 1942 and allowed to return to Luxembourg, an episode which he later wrote about in his memoirs of the camp and which was turned into a film.

Priestblock 25487 - A Memoir of Dachau. I read this book in 2 days. This true story is fascinating and shows what priests endured at the hands of the Nazis. In May Father Jean Bernard was arrested for denouncing the Nazis and deported from his native Luxembourg to Dachau's "Priest Block," a barracks that housed.

Father Jean Bernard (13 August 1907 – 1 September 1994) was a Catholic priest from Luxembourg who was imprisoned from May 1941 to August 1942 in the Nazi concentration camp at. .'Priestblock 25487: A Memoir of Dachau.

There is no street, nor anything else, at Dachau that is named after Father Jean Bernard, who wrote the book Priestblock 25487 in which he claimed that he never knew why he was arrested by the German Gestapo in January 1941. The number in the title of the book is Father Bernard’s prisoner identification number. The very first sentence in the Forward of Father Bernard’s book is this: I unburdened myself of the pages that follow immediately after my release.

History of Roman Catholicism in Germany. Priest Barracks of Dachau Concentration Camp

History of Roman Catholicism in Germany. Priest Barracks of Dachau Concentration Camp. The Ninth Day. ▾Book descriptions. n 1941, Father Jean Bernard was arrested for denouncing the Nazis and sent to Dachau’s Priest Block, a barracks that housed more than 3,000 clergymen of various denominations (mainly Roman Catholic priests). Priestblock 25487 tells the gripping true story of his survival amid brutality, degradation and torture. Casts light into dark and prviously neglected corners of the horror that was the Third Reich.

Jean Bernard was arrested for denouncing the Nazis and imprisoned in Dachau's Priest Block, a barracks that . A view of life insed of Dachau. com User, December 7, 2007

Jean Bernard was arrested for denouncing the Nazis and imprisoned in Dachau's Priest Block, a barracks that housed more than 3,000 clergy (th. com User, December 7, 2007. Priestblock 25487 - A Memoir of Dachau was written by Father Jean Bernard who was a priest from Luxemburg who was arrested by the Nazi (for what he never knew) and placed into Dachau. After the invasion of Luxemburg which was a predominant Catholic country many priest were arrested since they were seen as being too patriotic and as leaders of their communities. Survival story of a Roman Catholic priest, during WWII. An amazing and eye opening book about the treatment of people in the Nazi concentration camps.

In May 1941, Fr. Jean Bernard was arrested for denouncing the Nazis and imprisoned in Dachau's "Priest Block," a barracks that housed more than 3,000 clergy (the vast majority Roman Catholic priests).Priestblock 25487 tells the gripping true story of one remarkable priest's survival amid the inhuman brutality and torture of a Nazi concentration camp.In 2004, this important book was made into the award-winning film The Ninth Day. Introduction by Robert Royal. Preface by Cardinal O'Malley of Boston.

Praise for Priestblock 25487''Stunning... Casts light into dark and previously neglected corners of the horror that was the Third Reich.''–Richard John Neuhaus''Fr. Jean Bernard's portrait of survival in a German concentration camp is simple, forceful and vivid and therefore impossible to put down or forget. Priestblock 25487 is a diary of Catholic discipleship under extreme conditions that ranks with the great 20th Century personal testimonies against totalitarian violence.''–Archbishop Chaput''Many hundreds of books have been written about German concentration and extermination camps. Of these, Priestblock 25487 is among the very best. Every scholar and student of that dreadful chapter of 20th-century history ought to read and ponder its contents.''–John Lukacs, author The Hitler of History; and Five Days in London: May 1940''From the opening scene in a Nazi interrogation room, Priestblock 25487 moves with page-turning urgency as it brings to life a side of history that is too often forgotten. I highly recommend this powerful and inspiring book.''–Thomas E. Woods, author How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization''In its understated power, this brief book is unforgettable.''–Michael Novak''Important... luminous... Moves the reader to compassion and insight.''–Rachelle Linner, Catholic News Service''Deeply moving... The suffering of these priests for the sake of the loving God is one of the modern age's glorious mysteries.''–Fr. George Rutler''I found this compelling book hard to stop reading.''–Tim Johnson, Today's Catholic''Riveting... an important primary source for historians.''–John Burger, National Catholic Register''Absorbing... Beautifully written.''–Erin Ryan, National Catholic Reporter''A gripping story of heroism and horror that must never be forgotten.''First Things''Should be treated as a meditation, even something to be read again and again... So profound it deserves a wide readership.''–Barbara Stinson Lee, Intermountain Catholic''A must-read for Catholics. Provides fresh anecdotal insight into the Vatican's battle against the Nazis... As this first-hand account shows in riveting detail, the mere rumor of clerical opposition on the outside sufficed to intensify suffering on the inside.''–Daniel Cole, The Wanderer''A gripping testimony of the brutal treatment Catholic clergy received at the hands of the Nazis.'' –William Donohue, President, Catholic League''It is dramatic. It is brutally honest. I loved the book and could not put it down.''–Teresa Tomeo, Ave Maria Radio''I began reading this book on Friday night and finished the 175 pages in three hours. It was a book I could not put down or stop reading.''–Rev. Steve Wood, St. John's Evangelical Church

Delirium
A must read for anyone with an interest in WW 2. If this is how Hitler and the Nazis treated the Christian prisoners, I can't even begin to imagine how any of the Jews survived.

Two examples from the book follow, which some might call spoilers....

The most poignant moment for me was reading about how one of the priests (in a camp full of priests) was able to sneak in a piece of the consecrated Eucharist (Jesus, himself for Catholics, and particularly sacred for a priest). This priest shared a small piece with three of his brother priests there. They each treasured it, longing for the peace this sliver would bring to them, if consumed. Yet, even as they starved, each saved their sliver for the moment they were certain would come for each of them.. when they would be carried on to the transport to take them to the place of their death.

The most shocking of the many shocking stories was about how completely hungry these men were. There is one time when they are carted out to work in a field. Nearby, is a kitchen compost where scraps are dumped daily. The men - priests - watch as pieces of old lettuce or cabbage or a few carrot tops are dumped by kitchen staff. They make their way over to the compost, hoping to score a few of these scraps, but are noticed by a guard. The guard knows what they want, so he laughs and pees on the compost. The evil in that act is shocking, but what's more, these men are so hungry, they eat the scraps anyway. How can any person do that to another person? How?

This book is not for the faint of heart, but it will help the reader to appreciate, particularly in our age of excess, just how very different life was in a German concentration camp.
Whilingudw
I have read enough books on the Holocaust to feel that I have a fairly good grasp of what happened with many different groups of people, but this book was the only one that I have read that was by a priest and told of his personal struggles and those of his fellow priests in the world of Dachau. I have been to Dachau myself on a cold raw overcast day, and it was a very sobering experience thinking about the hundreds of thousands who had to stand roll call in every kind of weather in Hitler's concentration camps, and that was only the beginning of the horrors.

As a Christian, I found this account to be devastating on many levels - the wholesale defection of a large part of the church establishment in Europe, which of course, I already knew about, but I did not know from any intimate account the evil arrayed against the priests themselves. When a society turns good into evil and evil into good, it allows the powers of Hell to run rampant - a great warning to our present day world. Yes, it could and will happen again. Yes, immense evil can infect a society in only a few short years, and that society will bear no resemblance to what it thought it was before. I admire so much this priest's humility and the honesty that he shared with us that did not spare himself.
Urtte
The Nazis little-known war on the Catholic church is represented in Father Bernard's memoir by hundreds of cold, starving and exhausted priests. Their punishments and humiliations are daily and, perversely, they increase on holy days. The Jews who were the main focus of the camps and the targets of the camp policy are glimpsed in other parts of Dachau and especially in passing trains, crammed into boxcars. Bernard and the others are mindful of them and, through rumor, what is happening elsewhere. Like all Holocaust memoirs, Bernard's makes for harrowing reading but it's also uplifted by the brotherly affection most of the priests show each other, particularly in sharing part of their meager rations with those who are especially sick and weakened from their starvation and constant labor.
Shaktiktilar
My Father was in World War Two. As the first family man with two children to be called to wAr, he told stories of happenings, but hid a great deal inside his heart. No one can fully explain wAr and suffering fully.
Yalone
The memoir of the uncle of a friend of mine. I was captivated. This memoir formed the basis for the little known movie, the Ninth Day. Father Bernard was the editor of the Catholic press in Luxembourg, and knows how to tell a story. I have no religious faith, but was still deeply moved by the courage and integrity of the priests who suffered for their courage to speak out against oppression. I think this story should be better known.
Quinthy
Fascinating book about the many priests and religious Evangelists who were locked away in concentration blocks as well. This book is an excellent account of the fate of those in Priestblock 25487: A Memoir of Dachau. Having lived in Germany for 13 years, have visited Dachau and saw the horrible dormitories and crematories and the famous sign above the entrance: "Arbeit Macht Uns Frei" = "Work Makes Us Free. While 6 million Jews were murdered, 9 million people died, including Gypsies, Romanians, Religious professionals, Nuns, and many others who would not look the oth er way. Expanded my knowledge of the hatred existing in that part of the world at that time. Recommend this read.
Мох
I have stood at the spot of this Priestblock in Dachau. It's the only thing more haunting than the book itself. Yes, it is good to read about Christian heroes in a very dark time, but the book does nothing to detract from the overwhelming genocidal backdrop which was first and overwhelmingly about the Jews. What overcomes one - even more than the facts in this book - is the notion that - even with the war ending, and certain defeat, the Nazis decided it critical to perform R&D on how to kill Jews all the more efficiently - it was more important to them than the war, indeed than anything else.