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e-Book Keynes (Life & Times) epub download

e-Book Keynes (Life & Times) epub download

Author: Robert Cord
ISBN: 1905791003
Pages: 176 pages
Publisher: Haus Publishing (December 1, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Historical
Size ePUB: 1372 kb
Size Fb2: 1139 kb
Size DJVU: 1675 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 609
Format: doc mobi mbr lrf
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Keynes (Life & Times) epub download

by Robert Cord



Part of the Life & Times Series).

Part of the Life & Times Series). So successful was Keynes's theory that, by the mid 1940's, it was widespread across almost all of Europe's social democracies and, by the 1960's, the United States, too. Keynes personal life was no less remarkable.

The implied reader is someone who does not know about Eton College, Karl Marx or Isaac Newton. Specialists will question some of the judgments made but that is, perhaps, to miss the point, which is to stimulate interest in a remarkable figure about whose life many people would.

Overall, the book is very good and I recommend it to anyone who is. .Also, Skidelsky does spend much time thinking about Keyne's sexuality.

Overall, the book is very good and I recommend it to anyone who is interested in economics or finance. Let's re-promote the life and thinking of John Maynard Keynes by Robert Skidelsky in 2016. America needs this wise man's thinking. The sooner the better in my opinion. Maybe that is a wise professional choice in that it would have required a lot of ethereal philosophising. Still, during his youth, Keynes was a committed and in many ways open homosexual. Next thing you know he marries a woman and lives happily with her for the next 20 plus years.

Keynes biographer Robert Skidelsky recommends the best books about one of the . The second omission is Keynes’s homosexuality

Keynes biographer Robert Skidelsky recommends the best books about one of the most important economists of all time, John Maynard Keynes. Interview by Anna Blundy. The book was written six years after Keynes’s death but it still has its virtues. He has the virtue of intimacy and of knowing Keynes very well and knowing the time very well. The downsides of the book are its omissions. There are three big omissions. The second omission is Keynes’s homosexuality. For most of his life Keynes had boyfriends, the main one being Duncan Grant, the painter. They remained friends though their sexual relationship ceased.

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), the British economist who developed the theory that increasing government deficits stimulate a sluggish .

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), the British economist who developed the theory that increasing government deficits stimulate a sluggish economy, was long the guiding light of liberal economists. He is considered one of the major economists of the 20th century. And these days, he is enjoying a comeback. In his times, he quarreled with laissez-faire economic policies, and with the beliefs that all uncertainty could be reduced to measurable risk, that asset prices always reflected fundamentals and that unregulated markets would in general be very stable.

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Since 1980, the Los Angeles Times has awarded a set of annual book prizes

Since 1980, the Los Angeles Times has awarded a set of annual book prizes. The Prizes currently have nine categories: biography, current interest, fiction, first fiction (the Art Seidenbaum Award added in 1991), history, mystery/thriller (category added in 2000), poetry, science and technology (category added in 1989), and young adult fiction (category added in 1998). In addition, the Robert Kirsch Award is presented annually to a living author with a substantial connection to the American West

Cord looks at the work of Arnold Plant.

Publications (6). Frank Walter Paish (1898–1988). Although Paish was for a time influential in British government circles, his policy proposals subsequently fell out of favour due to the occurrence of high unemployment and persistent inflation. Cord looks at the work of Arnold Plant.

Keynes began working full-time at St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, where . His autobiography The Gates o. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, where he worked under George Gask and Sir Thomas Dunhill, after returning from World War I. Keynes used his influence as an assistant surgeon to advocate for limited surgery instead of the invasive radical mastectomy. Keynes maintained a passionate interest in English literature all his life and devoted a large amount of his time to literary scholarship and the science of bibliography His autobiography The Gates of Memory was published in 1981, and he died the following year, aged 95.

So successful was Keynes's theory that, by the mid 1940's, it was widespread across almost all of Europe's social democracies and, by the 1960's, the United States, too. Keynes personal life was no less remarkable.
Milleynti
That must be, surely, Keynes's most famous statement, and it's rightly famous. Before we get anywhere near the economic arguments in any technical sense, this simple insight tells economists what their job is. Their job is not, (labouring the point), to inform us how the various economic trends and processes will achieve equilibrium if we just give them long enough to work themselves out. The days of a man's life are threescore years and ten - if the man is lucky enough: Keynes did not live that long - and we ain't got that much time to give them. The high ground in any kind of argument can sometimes be achieved just by loudly asserting a claim to it, but the ultimate decider is often what Harold Macmillan called `Events, dear boy, events'. If the events were the 1930's slump, then that was bad luck for Friedrich von Hayek and his view that the strategy for economic bad times was to fold your arms and wait until they got better. Keynes had a better proposal.

I suppose this little book is a bit of a noddy-guide, but if so I would call it quite a good one. Robert Cord is plainly in command of the basic facts, including summary versions of the disputations that Keynes got into at frequent intervals. He is slightly prone to describe certain academics as `the most...' this that or the next, which is unwise. Try getting any gathering of economists to assent to any such simplistic proposition as that. However he is not so foolish as to try to describe Keynes himself as some `greatest economist' of the 20th century, or of the Christian era or any such jejune proclamation. What he does take as widely agreed is that Keynes inaugurated a new era in political economics, and that surely takes a bit of gainsaying.

What could put you off this book is a slightly odd and awkward style in the earlier chapters, less so in the later. Obviously such a short book cannot go into too much detail on every issue, but what the style sometimes reminded me of was obituaries in a college magazine - something, alas, that I have experience of writing. In particular there are insets printed in a nearly indecipherable pink giving potted accounts of some person place or thing that features in the accompanying text. How about `Eton is a famous English public school for boys'; or `Michal Kalecki was arguably the greatest all-round economist of the 20th century'; or `King George VI and Queen Elizabeth and their two daughters, Princesses Elizabeth (the present Queen...)'? Who, really, does Mr Cord think he is talking to? One rather entertaining case where I might have enjoyed some more detail is in respect of Keynes's less intellectual side. Mr Cord informs us, rather pompously I thought, that Sir Roy `Harrod wrote the first full-length biography of Keynes which, although competently written, glossed over various aspects of Keynes's life, in particular his homosexuality.' Cord has a couple of brief references to Keynes's membership of the Cambridge `Apostles' club which was `known for its homosexual tendencies around this time.' However Cord is, I fear, no fun at all about this, although he does at least confirm that `Three decades on, Keynes still clung to...the notion that love, beauty and truth should come before all else.' With thoughts such as these is it any wonder that Keynes became an economist?

What I like about this book is that it gets its balance right. There is a certain amount about the great man's personality and personal life, but the bulk of it is about what Keynes is significant for. The account of the academic toing and froing is nicely judged, I thought. Keynes did not get the best of every duel or get unfailingly flattering reviews by any means. Also, there was luck as well as merit in the achievement: he was often just at the right time in delivering his insights for them to be listened to. As I have just relegated the significance of personality behind that of intellect, I should take a step backwards and compliment Mr Cord for his entirely proper stress on the impact that Keynes's seemingly charismatic personality often had in winning over opinion.

In my own opinion we are all deeply in his debt. We're all dead in the long run, and the thing about managing an economy is to get it to deliver for us while we're still here, and to dig us out of pits we manage to get into. It is not some ivory tower academic exercise, and the irony is that it was this eburnean aesthete who had the best practical grasp of that matter, so far as the rest of us are concerned. Sit ei terra levis.
Skilkancar
Cord does an above average job of covering Keynes's life.The book is written for a reader who has no idea who J M Keynes was or what he did.Such a reader would not have taken a principles of macroeconomics course.The reader will learn the following:

(a)-Keynes was a world class philosopher-logician besides being the greatest economist of the 20th century.

(b)-Keynes was a major advisor to the British Treasury department from 1916 through 1946

(c)-Keynes was an elite member of The Apostles ,a secret Cambridge intellectual and debating club,and the Bloomsbury group,which was a famous group of artists,painters,sculptors,writers,and poets.

(d)-Keynes married the famous ballerina, Lydia Lopokova.

(e)-Keynes was the bursar(treasurer) for Cambridge.

(f)-Keynes is practically the only economist in history,besides Ricardo,who was able to make a fortune by his own private investing skills.

Cord has included a large number of pictures and explanations of the various persons who interacted with Keynes throughout his varied life.A reader of the book will have no idea of why Keynes is considered the greatest economist of the 20th century.However,this is a minor problem because the vast majority of economists haven't a clue either.