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e-Book Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood epub download

e-Book Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood epub download

Author: Martin Lemelman
ISBN: 1608190048
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; 1st edition (August 31, 2010)
Language: English
Category: Historical
Size ePUB: 1909 kb
Size Fb2: 1176 kb
Size DJVU: 1402 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 290
Format: doc docx lrf txt
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood epub download

by Martin Lemelman



Two Cents Plain takes the cutting edge form of a graphic novel, but it's a. .Through Lemelman's strong narrative voice and spare images, Two Cents Plain is a haunting and unforgettable black and white encounter with the past.

Two Cents Plain takes the cutting edge form of a graphic novel, but it's a classic coming of age story set in Brooklyn in the 1950s and '60s. Lemelman's detailed pencil drawings, sprinkled with Yiddish sayings and dialogue capturing the colorful, broken English of his immigrant parents, tell the story of his hard-working parents fleeing the Holocaust after WWII and setting up shop in Teddy's Candy Store, selling ice cream, cigarettes, sodas, egg creams, newspapers, and toys.

Two Cents Plain book. In Two Cents Plain, Lemelman pieces together the fragments of his past in an effort to come to terms with a childhood that was marked by struggle both in and outside of the home

Two Cents Plain book. Martin Lemelman's elegiac and bittersweet graphic memoir Two Cents. In Two Cents Plain, Lemelman pieces together the fragments of his past in an effort to come to terms with a childhood that was marked by struggle both in and outside of the home. But his was not a childhood wholly without its pleasures. Lemelman's Brooklyn is also the nostalgic place of egg creams and comic books, malteds and novelty toys, where the voices of Brownsville's denizens-the deli man, the fish man, and the fruit man-all come to vivid life.

My Brooklyn Boyhood Martin Lemelman. A book that is both a celebration and an affirmation of life. Last modified 04/01/2011. Design and development by i3design.

by Martin Lemelman & illustrated by Martin Lemelman.

Martin Lemelman’s rich graphic memoir is based on his recollections of growing up in a Brooklyn, New York neighborhood in the 1950’s and 60’s. Drawing on memories and recordings of his mother and father (see his other graphic memoir, Mendel’s Daughters), Two Cents Plain traces Lemelman’s path to manhood. Through Lemelman’s strong narrative voice and spare images, Two Cents Plain is a haunting and unforgettable black and white encounter with the past. Gary Katz received an MA in English from the University of Nebraska-Omaha.

Martin Lemelman (born October 26, 1950) is an American freelance illustrator and graphic memoirist. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he grew up in an Orthodox Jewish home, and attended a yeshiva. At 13 he decided he wanted to be an artist. His training in art began after entering Brooklyn College, where he received undergraduate and Masters of Fine Arts degrees. Since 1976 he has been a freelance illustrator.

Illustrator Martin Lemelman depicts his youth as an immigrant (the son of Holocaust survivors) living in Brownsville, Brooklyn, in Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood, his graphic-novel memoir, which he'll present here. Posted: Thursday March 15 2012.

Items related to Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood. Lemelman, Martin Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood. ISBN 13: 9781608190041. Two Cents Plain: My Brooklyn Boyhood. A professor in the Communication Design Department at Kutztown University, he lives in Allentown, Pennsylvania with his wife, Monica, and is the father of four sons.

Martin Lemelman's elegiac and bittersweet graphic memoir Two Cents Plain collects the memories and artifacts of the author's childhood in Brooklyn. The son of Holocaust survivors, Lemelman grew up in the back of his family's candy store in Brownsville during the 1950s and '60s, as the neighborhood, and much of the city, moved into a period of deep decline. In Two Cents Plain, Lemelman pieces together the fragments of his past in an effort to come to terms with a childhood that was marked by struggle both in and outside of the home. But his was not a childhood wholly without its pleasures. Lemelman's Brooklyn is also the nostalgic place of egg creams and comic books, malteds and novelty toys, where the voices of Brownsville's denizens―the deli man, the fish man, and the fruit man―all come to vivid life. Between the lingering strains of the Holocaust and the increasing violence on the city's streets, Two Cents Plain reaches its dramatic climax in 1968, as Lemelman's worlds explode, forcing him and his family to re-create their lives. Through his stirring narrative and richly rendered black-and-white drawings, family photographs, and found objects, Lemelman creates a lush, layered view of a long-lost time and place, the chronicle of a family and a city in crisis. Two Cents Plain is a wholly unique memoir and a reading experience not soon forgotten.

Daiktilar
my childhood was spent in Brooklyn- it brought back many memories which I confess were forgotten--glad the book was referred to me by my son- those memories reminded me of many experiences I want to remember.
Vudomuro
I really loved this book. I originally got it because my son loves graphic novels and I saw it in a comic book store in Manhattan (NY). It looked interesting and I bought it though I normally don't read graphic novels.
It was powerful, interesting and the illustrations really made the experience different for me. I recommend this book!
I bought this book for my friend who is teaching a class on the graphic novel. He also liked it.
Kulalas
I also own a copy of "Mendel's Daughter" and Mr. Lemelman has done another superb job of illustrating (in this case, his autobiography). This is no ordinary story, as it's very powerful and poignant.
Gavikelv
"Two Cents Plain" is a wonderfully illustrated and moving memoir. I never expected to be touched so deeply by a graphic novel. Mr. Lemelman's Brooklyn boyhood was something from another era. The book is a fascinating tale of survival against relentless obstacles. I highly recommend it.
Xlisiahal
very interesting book,well written. it brings you back to the old neighborhood in graphic detail. brooklyn at a turning point in history.
Nagis
I was deeply moved by Two Cents Plain, which I read in one day. This is a graphic memoir recounting the author's boyhood in Brooklyn in the 1950s and 60s, with intimate portraits of his immigrant parents who survived the Second World War in Eastern Europe and emigrated due to lingering antisemitism. They run a shop, and the book describes and visually portrays in great detail the items they sold, the customers, the neighborhood, their living conditions, and the changes in the neighborhood over time, as well as the family members' relationship s with one another. In short, it's a remarkable account of first generation Jewish life in 1950s Brooklyn, told as a coming of age story. There's no real plot to speak of, beyond what I've just said. The interest is in the loving portrayal of a lifestyle, the history of a neighborhood now gone, and the personalities of the individuals involved.

I'm sure my reaction was based in large part on the overlap between my boyhood and the author's, although in many ways they weren't very similar. I'm several years younger than the author, my parents were both born in the U.S. and were professionals, not shopkeepers, and we didn't live surrounded by immigrants. Nevertheless, I was amazed at the memories this book brought back of life in the 50s and 60s in New York. The author not only illustrates the book beautifully--he's an exceptional artist--but includes many photographs of miscellaneous items from those days, such as little toys or candies his parents sold in their shop, that epitomized childhood for me, but which I hadn't seen or thought about for decades. My own parents were well educated and spoke fine English, but occasionally used yiddish expressions they'd picked up from their immigrant parents. Such expressions are used throughout Two Cents Plain, and I'm sure my mother would get a kick out of seeing that they haven't disappeared completely, unlike the neighborhood the author grew up in.
Flower
Think you've read just about every Jewish memoir out there? Maybe you have....but this one goes beyond printed words on a page, with personal illustrations, as well as some copies of actual photos, that make the book rich and multi-faceted. It is a quick read, mainly because the words are relatively few. But that doesn't make this work any less resonant. The author starts with family history and, as might be expected, this includes Holocaust history, deep and searingly painful. Again, perhaps nothing new, but seeing the faces of family members as they recount their memories, tore at my heart. Everything described became far more immediate, more real. I'd go so far as to consider this a collector's item and believe it will come to be even more appreciated in years to come. It is unique and special.

The 1950s covers much of the period in this book and the life lived by Martin and his brother and parents is spartan. His parents run a candy store (which eventually becomes a combination of ice cream parlor and hardware store, filled to the brim with all sorts of objects). Meanwhile, the family lives in the back of the store in a space crammed with boxes of merchandise. They struggle to make a living but do get by, with one son sleeping by a noisy refrigerator and the other sharing space in his parents' bedroom. Martin's mother and father have a turbulent relationship but they stick together and when their love is tested they come through for each other.

One of the most poignant parts of this book was seeing how the neighborhood changed from a vibrant Jewish area to one which eventually became a historic relic. As a child, Lemelman's world was bordered by Kosher markets, carts full of fruit seller, noisy streets lined by vendors selling all sorts of wares. But as the neighborhood changes, his parents are among the few holdouts until a crucial incident shakes them to the core. Again, this book doesn't take long to read (although I did linger on many of the pages, taking in both words and drawings) but it is likely to leave a lasting impression.

This isn't a story of coming to America and striking it rich. Instead, this is a realistic look at a family who has ups and downs and eke out a living as best they can. Their resilience and dignity while running Teddy's Candy Store was an inspiration to me, even though Lemelman portrays a gritty world, even including the cockroaches and rats that went after the food and ice cream in the store. Many of the sections start with Yiddish sayings, an extra layer that added much to this book. Highly recommended!