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e-Book Beyond the White House: Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope epub download

e-Book Beyond the White House: Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope epub download

Author: Jimmy Carter
ISBN: 1416558802
Pages: 288 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st edition (October 2, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Size ePUB: 1820 kb
Size Fb2: 1881 kb
Size DJVU: 1717 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 780
Format: rtf lit mbr txt
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Beyond the White House: Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope epub download

by Jimmy Carter



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Through The Carter Center, which he and Rosalynn Carter founded in 1982, he has fought neglected diseases, waged peace in war zones, and built hope among some of the most forgotten and needy people in the world

Through The Carter Center, which he and Rosalynn Carter founded in 1982, he has fought neglected diseases, waged peace in war zones, and built hope among some of the most forgotten and needy people in the world. Serving in more than seventy nations, Carter has led peacekeeping efforts for Ethiopia, North Korea, Haiti, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Uganda, and Sudan. With his colleagues from The Carter Center, he has monitored more than sixty-five elections in troubled nations, from Palestine to Indonesia.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Through The Carter Center, which he and Rosalynn Carter founded in 1982, he has fought neglected diseases, waged peace in war zones, and built hope among some of the most forgotten and needy people in the world.

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Beyond the White House is a book written by former . President Jimmy Carter and it covers his political, social, and humanitarian activities since he left the White House early in 1981. Carter has achieved much in his days since leaving Washington . Through his Carter Center, the former president, his wife Rosalynn, and their team of associates at the center have labored long hours, traveled around the world, and met with dozens of foreign leaders to work out agreements, wipe out disease, and improve political freedom.

Beyond the white house. Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope

Beyond the white house. Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope. After leaving the White House, Carter (Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis, 2005, et. wished to create a nonpartisan agency dedicated to action in the service of peace, freedom, democracy, human rights, environmental quality, nuclear-arms control and the alleviation of suffering from disease.

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This is the story of President Jimmy Carter's post-presidency, the most admired and productive in the nation's history. Through The Carter Center, which he and Rosalynn Carter founded in 1982, he has fought neglected diseases, waged peace in war zones, and built hope among some of the most forgotten and needy people in the world. Serving in more than seventy nations, Carter has led peacekeeping efforts for Ethiopia, North Korea, Haiti, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Uganda, and Sudan. With his colleagues from The Carter Center, he has monitored more than sixty-five elections in troubled nations, from Palestine to Indonesia. Carter's bold initiatives, undertaken with dedicated colleagues, have eliminated, prevented, or cured an array of diseases that have been characterized as "neglected" by the World Health Organization and that afflict tens of millions of people unnecessarily. The Carter Center has taught millions of African families how to increase the production of food grains, and Rosalynn Carter has led a vigorous war against the stigma of mental illness around the world. "Immersing ourselves among these deprived and suffering people has been a great blessing as it stretched our minds and hearts," Jimmy Carter writes. "The principles of The Carter Center have been the same ones that should characterize our nation, or any individual. They are the beliefs inherent in all the great world religions, including commitments to peace, justice, freedom, humility, forgiveness or an attempt to find accommodation with potential foes, generosity, human rights or fair treatment of others, protection of the environment, and the alleviation of suffering. This is our agenda for the future."
Felolv
sadly, Jimmy just didn't "get it" back then and this publication serves to underscore the fact that he still just doesn't get it.
Nto
Beyond the White House is a book written by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and it covers his political, social, and humanitarian activities since he left the White House early in 1981. Carter has achieved much in his days since leaving Washington D.C. and he seems anxious to share his accomplishments with the reader. Through his Carter Center, the former president, his wife Rosalynn, and their team of associates at the center have labored long hours, traveled around the world, and met with dozens of foreign leaders to work out agreements, wipe out disease, and improve political freedom.

Most people already know about Jimmy Carter's humanitarian works and his efforts to improve the world around him. But some may not be aware of the actual events that have transpired while working toward these goals. Carter explains some of them in detail, and in some instances, he takes the details a bit too far. This is especially true in the book's opening chapters when Carter is discussing his meetings with government leaders of different countries. When I started to read this part of the book, I was expecting something written in a manner similar to a personal memoir. Instead, these opening chapters read like a play- by- play excerpt from a diary. I was expecting a quick overview of the meetings and what was achieved, but Carter felt the need to give the rundown on what happened each day and at different times throughout the day. A quick summary would have been sufficient.

In the second half of the book, however, Carter settles down and starts to talk about some of his important humanitarian achievements. I particularly liked the chapter on fighting disease. I was fully aware of Carter's work with Habitat for Humanity and I knew that he and his wife Rosalynn Carter were active in working toward a disease- free world. But I did not know exactly what diseases were high on their list and what level of success they had achieved. This chapter explains it all, and it includes some graphic photographs of individuals inflicted with certain preventable diseases. Carter explains in this chapter how he and his associates at the Carter Center have worked with the native people of different African nations and have helped them eliminate many diseases simply by encouraging cleanliness and by advocating filtering water before drinking.

The chapter titled "Building Hope" is another good chapter because it includes some of Carter's work on human rights. I would have preferred that this chapter be a little longer, but it still gets the point across. Carter is very concerned about political freedom and he has worked long and hard to spread democracy and basic human rights around the world. I also liked that he included a section on his work in his home state of Georgia; specifically, in the city of Atlanta, to improve living conditions among the city's poor.

Beyond the White House isn't a political book in the usual sense. Carter voices a few concerns about the human rights violations that have taken place under George W. Bush's watch and he points out the positive working relationship he has enjoyed with Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush, and others. But other than that, he steers clear of political criticisms and differences in this book. He wanted this to be a book about the accomplishments of the Carter Center and he wanted to inspire everyone to work toward change for the betterment of humans around the world. For the most part, this book generally succeeds in these endeavors.

Overall, Beyond the White House is a good book about Jimmy Carter's work as an ex- president and it details the many accomplishments of the Carter Center in its efforts to spread democracy, eliminate disease, and encouraging improvements in human rights. The first part of the book is a little more detailed than it needed to be, and some of the other chapters could use a little more length. But the book is still good overall and it presents a nice summary of what a person can achieve to improve the world around them. Carter had his share of difficulties as president, but his days since leaving the White House have been filled with achievement, and his life is a good example of the good that people can do in the later stages of their lives.
monotronik
Read it for yourself and be inspired to get out there and make the world a better place; President Carter certainly has and continues to. Be inspired!!!
Cerana
Ex-Presidents enjoy many privileges and "Beyond the White House" demonstrates that one of them is getting mediocre books published.

"Beyond the White House," has the feel of many loose-ends, however interesting and worthy of recounting, carelessly stitched together.

There is no narrative to speak of. Only the single-thread of a post-presidency binds these tales of the Carters' (husband and wife) forays into battle against disease, dictatorship and poverty.

As writer/politician, Carter lacks President Barack Obama's literary gift, but his mind is organized and his prose sparing to the good.

This book provides a window on the world of philanthropy with accounts of how money is raised, how staffing is done, and how people who used to have important, official titles (eg; Colin Powell) later leverage them for the benefit of others.

Carter's accounts of political work in places like Haiti, North Korea, and the Sudan make for good inside stuff (if at times dated). Things get particularly interesting when his interventions require vetting or consultation with a sitting American president.

Carter's efforts in fighting disease are simultaneously stomach-churning and heart-warming.

For those not indoctrinated, the reports on the nasty ailments plaguing millions of people in the undeveloped world thanks to ignorance, cultural resistance, or hapless governments give pause and reason for thanks.

The solutions, at times, are mind-numbingly simple and enough to make one curse the world for not applying them more readily.

Carter has done a lot of good in these areas. And so, by the way, have the major drug-makers he prodded into financing massive, free distributions of badly needed medicines in forgotten and miserable backwaters around the world.

In "Beyond the White House," the ex-president pats his own back, but there's no denying his level of achievement and commitment to the less-fortunate. One can't lead by example if nobody's aware of what they're up to.

There are things in "Beyond the White House" worthy of absorbing for Carter fans, presidential scholars, or politics junkies, but on the whole, there is no whole.

So, if you're so inclined, go forth with this brief foreshadowing of what lies ahead.