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e-Book Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman (Random House Large Print) epub download

e-Book Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman (Random House Large Print) epub download

Author: Jon Krakauer
ISBN: 0739327631
Pages: 592 pages
Publisher: Random House Large Print; Large Print edition (September 15, 2009)
Language: English
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Size ePUB: 1542 kb
Size Fb2: 1608 kb
Size DJVU: 1520 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 531
Format: docx lrf txt rtf
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman (Random House Large Print) epub download

by Jon Krakauer



But on April 22, 2004, his life would end in a barrage of bullets fired by his fellow soldiers. Krakauer chronicles Tillman’s riveting, tragic odyssey in engrossing detail highlighting his remarkable character and personality while closely examining the murky, heartbreaking circumstances of his death.

Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, a 2009 book written by Jon Krakauer, is a biography of Pat Tillman, an American football player who left his professional career and enlisted in the United States Army after the September 11 attacks

Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, a 2009 book written by Jon Krakauer, is a biography of Pat Tillman, an American football player who left his professional career and enlisted in the United States Army after the September 11 attacks. He subsequently was killed in 2004 in the US war in Afghanistan.

Krakauer chronicles Tillman’s riveting, tragic odyssey in engrossing detail highlighting his remarkable character and personality while closely examining the murky, heartbreaking circumstances of his death.

Where Men Win Glory book. Like the men whose epic stories Jon Krakauer has told in his previous bestsellers, Pat Tillman was an irrepressible individualist and iconoclast

Where Men Win Glory book. The bestselling author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and. Like the men whose epic stories Jon Krakauer has told in his previous bestsellers, Pat Tillman was an irrepressible individualist and iconoclast.

In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer draws on Tillman's journals and letters, interviews with his .

On one level, Jon Krakauer's Where Men Win Glory represents a detailed look at the tragic tale of Pat Tillman, the football star who quit the NFL to enlist in the Army and was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-366) and index

Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-366) and index. San Francisco Bay area - Afghanistan - Iraq - Jessica Lynch Convoy, March 23, 2003 - Battle of Nasiriyah, March 23, 2003 - Movement of Tillman's Ranger Platoon, April 14-25, 2004 - Firefight in Tillman Pass, April 22, 2004 - Firefight in Tillman Pass, West End of Canyon, April 22, 2004.

The story of Pat Tillman, the professional football player killed in Afghanistan in 2004, was simultaneously appalling and inspiring . The best-selling author Jon Krakauer has now told the full story in Where Men Win Glory.

The story of Pat Tillman, the professional football player killed in Afghanistan in 2004, was simultaneously appalling and inspiring - which helped explain, perhaps, the mesmerizing grip it had on the United States.

The Odyssey of Pat Tillman.

The fallen man at the heart of Where Men Win Glory quickly emerges as a classic Krakauer character. A charismatic athlete possessed of an insatiably curious mind, Tillman spurned the riches of life. to pursue old-fashioned notions of honor and sacrifice. He’s Into the Wild’s Chris McCandless gone to war. Outside Magazine. Nuanced, thorough, and chilling. The arc of Tillman’s life. echoes the trajectory of a classical hero’s tale. It acquires an almost legendary power.

The bestselling author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and Under the Banner of Heaven delivers a stunning, eloquent account of a remarkable young man’s haunting journey. Like the men whose epic stories Jon Krakauer has told in his previous bestsellers, Pat Tillman was an irrepressible individualist and iconoclast. In May 2002, Tillman walked away from his $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist in the United States Army. He was deeply troubled by 9/11, and he felt a strong moral obligation to join the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban. Two years later, he died on a desolate hillside in southeastern Afghanistan. Though obvious to most of the two dozen soldiers on the scene that a ranger in Tillman’s own platoon had fired the fatal shots, the Army aggressively maneuvered to keep this information from Tillman’s wife, other family members, and the American public for five weeks following his death. During this time, President Bush repeatedly invoked Tillman’s name to promote his administration’s foreign policy. Long after Tillman’s nationally televised memorial service, the Army grudgingly notified his closest relatives that he had “probably” been killed by friendly fire while it continued to dissemble about the details of his death and who was responsible. In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer draws on Tillman’s journals and letters, interviews with his wife and friends, conversations with the soldiers who served alongside him, and extensive research on the ground in Afghanistan to render an intricate mosaic of this driven, complex, and uncommonly compelling figure as well as the definitive accountof the events and actions that led to his death. Before he enlisted in the army, Tillman was familiar to sports aficionados as an undersized, overachieving Arizona Cardinals safety whose virtuosity in the defensive backfield was spellbinding. With his shoulder-length hair, outspoken views, and boundless intellectual curiosity, Tillman was considered a maverick. America was fascinated when he traded the bright lights and riches of the NFL for boot camp and a buzz cut. Sent first to Iraq—a war he would openly declare was “illegal as hell” —and eventually to Afghanistan, Tillman was driven by complicated, emotionally charged, sometimes contradictory notions of duty, honor, justice, patriotism, and masculine pride, and he was determined to serve his entire three-year commitment. But on April 22, 2004, his life would end in a barrage of bullets fired by his fellow soldiers. Krakauer chronicles Tillman’s riveting, tragic odyssey in engrossing detail highlighting his remarkable character and personality while closely examining the murky, heartbreaking circumstances of his death. Infused with the power and authenticity readers have come to expect from Krakauer’s storytelling, Where Men Win Glory exposes shattering truths about men and war. From the Hardcover edition.
Laitchai
Where Men Win Glory

Jon Krakauer's where Men Win Glory is a page turning, can't put it down book about the life and death of a very complex man, Pat Tillman. The only fault I find with Krakauer's book is the title. Tillman was an unselfish man in pursuit of honor, not glory. After reading the book, I was impressed by his ethic, incredulous at his decision to enlist, and despondent to the point of tears for the how and why he died and the ensuing cover-up by the army.

Depending upon the source, Tillman was a very good to just above average football player. Krakauer develop Tillman's character from early in his life as a risk taker who s challenged himself, not so much for the thrill, but the development of self reliance and self confidence. A character willing to stand up for the Little guy, to the point of fault, the path of least resistance never seemed to be the road taken. He had a great sense of loyalty to family, friends, teammates, the Arizona Cardinals, and his ranger comrades.

I looked upon the book as a story with a long prelude, that explains why Pat Tillman made the decision to enlist in the Army, and Krakauer does a brilliant job providing the reader with a dissection of Tillman's complexity. Why would a man who, to the average person, had everything, give it all up? Upon finishing Where Men Win Glory, the reader might begin to understand.

From the introduction to Part Two, a quote from Chris Hedges, "A Culture of Atrocity"
"War is always about betrayal, betrayal of the young by the old, of idealists by cynics and of troops by politicians." Krakauer leads the reader to understand that after Tillman made the decision to enlist, though filled with second thoughts, he believed in, and followed through with the commitments he made. He was a man who had questions about serving the man in charge, George Bush, but not the country he volunteered to protect. Yet, though he would follow through with orders given, his insights and analysis helps one understand why the armed forces prefer them young and dumb.

Krakauer is keen in his judgements and implications of the shadiness of the Bush/Cheney/Rumsfeld regime, in cahoots with a military powerful, like none other in the history of the world, yet possessing a command structure with the overall intelligence of someone with a room temperature IQ. The book periodically exposes the public relations stunts by the Bush Administration to capitalize on small stories, loaded with prevarication, to obscure messes wandered into by the army in Iraq and Afghanistan, notably the Jessica Lynch story that provided escape from the fratricide and casualties during the attack Nasriyah and the cover-up of Tillman's death, and what was nothing more than the scapegoating of his platoon leader, Lieutenant David Uthlaut.

Krakauer makes extensive use of Pat Tillman's journal and written correspondence. This provides insight into the mind, the method and the madness of what made Pat Tillman. Defensive coordinator for the Arizona Cardinals, in his eulogy to pat Tillman catches the essence of the man," as fiercely unique, with a strong dislike for the easy way out. He was caring, he was thoughtful and he was soft. Pat was soft in the heart. He was humble yet confident, reserved, but he was hard. You wanted this guy on your team, and it didn't have to be a football team..." In the end, Tillman's decision to join the army and fight in Afghanistan was not a tragic flaw in this unique man's short Journey through life, but a "tragic virtue."

I highly recommend Jon Krakauer's book about the life of Pat Tillman, Where Men Win Glory.
Gaudiker
If you're looking for a book to make you feel good about the wars in Iraq and/or Afghanistan, skip this one. Reading about Tillman's journey that took him on an uncommon journey to a sad conclusion brings to mind the death Kelton Turner, an 18-year old Marine, the last soldier killed Vietnam in 1975. We can and should ask, "Why? What was accomplished by their sacrifices and the pain and sacrifices of their families?"

Does Krakauer's telling to the Tillman story represent truth, a sliver of truth or something more? Each reader will reach his or her own conclusion. Mine is this: Everyone should read the book and then set it down and reflect. There are important lessons therein.

Unfortunately, I fear those lessons will be easily forgotten or worse, ignored.
Dyni
I was blown away by this book. The way the Tillman family was treated by the US Army after Pat died was heartbreaking. Like most Americans, I love my country. However, this book helped me to understand what I think we all suspect. The US government and military will do what is right for themselves, not what is right for its people or its soldiers. Our country is headed for a dark place if this type of leadership is allowed to continue. I've never read about or heard of a man like Pat Tillman. Men like Pat (if they even exist) are the unique type of human being truly capable of altruistic leadership, but how can these men succeed in a culture where cheaters and liars have the obvious advantage and are the type that covet positions of power?? This book was enlightening, concerning, and inspiring. Krakauer is a fine writer and I'm very thankful that he shared Pat Tillman's story. THANK YOU!
Globus
Many people decry Krakauer's narrative of Pat Tillman as politically slanted in this book. I disagree. Krakauer both humanizes and heroificates Pat Tillman, providing an honest, yet inspiring portrait of the man who walked away from a multimillion dollar NFL contract to serve his country. Tragically, a large part of Pat's story is the high-level cover-up that shrouded the details of his friendly fire killing as propaganda. Krakauer spares no punches against those involved, but never shifts the focus off of Tillman, as using him as a symbol of liberal dissatisfaction would be just as dehumanizing as his posthumous portrayal by the Bush administration. Readers of this book will leave with new perspective not on the war on terror, but with life as a whole. I think it's what Pat would have wanted.
Magis
I love the way that Jon Krakauer titled this book. Had it been title perhaps ANY other way, I would have read it differently than I did.

I knew the story of Pat Tillman vaguely and now having read all of the disturbing details about it, he is no less of a hero than the Army and administration wrongly manipulated him to be. It's unfortunate that the fact that he died as a result of friendly fire was initially hidden to try to bolster support for the war effort.

Having been in the military for 23 years, I understand that bad stuff happens. But after reading about the handling of the Pat Tillman incident, or whatever you want to call it, I admittedly have lost some faith in my government. It broke my heart to hear about the dishonesty with the Tillman family for the sake of political gain.

War is not something to be trifled with. In my opinion it's a tragic and unavoidable circumstance of the fallen world we live in, so to see it, and specifically the death of a servicemember, ANY servicemember, used for manipulative purposes, doesn't sit well with me.

Many of the reviews of this book claim that it is leftist propoganda. I honestly don't think Krakauer writes like that. It's simply an honest characterization of the facts as he discovered them in his research. Does it support a leftist agenda? Perhaps it does, but the truth shouldn't be distorted for some political purpose. That's the tragedy of the Pat Tillman story in the first place.