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e-Book Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN epub download

e-Book Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN epub download

Author: Andrew Wiest,Jim Webb
ISBN: 0814794106
Pages: 368 pages
Publisher: NYU Press; Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition (December 1, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Size ePUB: 1991 kb
Size Fb2: 1338 kb
Size DJVU: 1839 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 503
Format: lrf mobi lit lrf
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN epub download

by Andrew Wiest,Jim Webb



2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography Vietnam’s Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in. .

Both men fought with valor in a war that seemed to have no end, exemplifying ARVN bravery and determination that is largely forgotten or ignored in the West. Admiring biography of two officers in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN), which fought far better than most American histories have acknowledged. Vietnam has a long martial tradition, writes.

No book about the Vietnam War can be simply a book about the Vietnam War. Vietnam’s Forgotten Army appears in the midst of a raging debate over American armed interventions abroad and over the proper lessons to draw from Vietnam for the war in Iraq. Andrew Wiest is Professor of History and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of War and Society at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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Home Browse Books Book details, Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal. Andrew Wiest weaves historical analysis with a compelling narrative, culled from extensive interviews with Dinh, Hue, and other key figures. Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the Arvn. Their experiences and legacies mirror that of the ARVNs rise and fall as well as the tragic history of South Vietnam.

Andrew Wiest’s excellent book helps to fill a yawning void in the history of the Vietnam Wa. Professor Wiest tells the fascinating story of two young ARVN officers, Pham Van Dinh and Tran Ngoc Hue, whose lives paralleled one another to an amazing degree but who made starkly different choices when confronted, as both were, with the grimmest choice a soldier can face.

Vietnam's Forgotten Army book. 2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography. 2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award. Both men fought with valor in a war that seemed to have no end, exemplifying ARVN bravery and determination 2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography.

Vietnam’s Forgotten Army Andrew Wiest Vietnam’s Forgotten Army Heroism .

Vietnam’s Forgotten Army Andrew Wiest Vietnam’s Forgotten Army Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN a New York Universi. Author: Andrew Wiest Jim Webb. Acknowledgments Foreword by James Webb Preface:Welcome to America Introduction: Welcome to Vietnam. My greatest thanks, though, go to my wife, Jill (CEO of the Wiest household and my best friend), and to my beloved children, Abigail and Luke. Andrew Wiest, Jim Webb. Скачать (pdf, . 8 Mb).

2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography

Vietnam’s Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN chronicles the lives of Pham Van Dinh and Tran Ngoc Hue, two of the brightest young stars in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN). Both men fought with valor in a war that seemed to have no end, exemplifying ARVN bravery and determination that is largely forgotten or ignored in the West. However, while Hue fought until he was captured by the North Vietnamese Army and then endured thirteen years of captivity, Dinh surrendered and defected to the enemy, for whom he served as a teacher in the reeducation of his former ARVN comrades.

An understanding of how two lives that were so similar diverged so dramatically provides a lens through which to understand the ARVN and South Vietnam’s complex relationship with Americas government and military. The lives of Dinh and Hue reflect the ARVNs battlefield successes, from the recapture of the Citadel in Hue City in the Tet Offensive of 1968, to Dinhs unheralded role in the seizure of Hamburger Hill a year later. However, their careers expose an ARVN that was over-politicized, tactically flawed, and dependent on American logistical and firepower support. Marginalized within an American war, ARVN faced a grim fate as U.S. forces began to exit the conflict. As the structure of the ARVN/U.S. alliance unraveled, Dinh and Hue were left alone to make the most difficult decisions of their lives.

Andrew Wiest weaves historical analysis with a compelling narrative, culled from extensive interviews with Dinh, Hue, and other key figures. Once both military superstars, Dinh is viewed by a traitor by many within the South Vietnamese community, while Hue, an expatriate living in northern Virginia, is seen as a hero who never let go of his ideals. Their experiences and legacies mirror that of the ARVNs rise and fall as well as the tragic history of South Vietnam.

Zonama
There are a number of problems with this book, not in the least are contextual and factual errors. As an intelligence analyst with the 571st MI Detachment, headquartered in Da Nang at the time of the Easter Offensive, I remember this incident well.
First, the movement of switching regimental locations after only 5 months. As two of the three regiments were newly organized, it seems odd that two regiments would be moving after such a short time. It was also well known that the new regiments were being filled with deserters (of which there were an average of 130,000 per year throughout South Vietnam), ex-prisoners, etc, to fill their ranks. Further, the 56th was headed SW from FSB C-2 – away from the DMZ when the NVA poured across. “Some men fled the battle…” indeed it’s been estimated that some 186,000 ARVN ran that year, country-wide.
Second, the “vaunted NVA intelligence” depended a lot on VC and traitors within the ARVN – if you know when, why and how units directly opposite you are going to move, then crushing them certainly fits the “course of certain events.”
Third, “saving his men” while surrendering the largest artillery support base in I Corps, Camp Carroll, ignores the fact that the whole western facing fire bases were doomed as a result. Many more men than just the 56th ARVN Regiment died because of Dinh’s actions.
Fourth, there was no 26th NVA Regiment. The 24th NVA Regiment of the 304th NVA Division surrounded and took Camp Carroll. One of Camp Carroll’s 175mm guns is on display in Hanoi.
Fifth, Dinh disclaims the radio message that Hanoi broadcast on 3 Apr 72 (the text of which was not included in the book) in which he stated that he had “returned to the National Liberation Front Forces.” A picture of Dinh, from another source, shaking hands with a NVA representative while all of his men were applauding speaks volumes however.
Finally, Dinh is quick to blame others; therefore “they” are responsible for his actions and inactions and ultimate surrender. An American unit would have fought on to the last man, so blaming the Americans for his actions won’t work.
While only Dinh can make peace with himself, what of the others who lost their lives due to his cowardice?
The_NiGGa
When this reader returned from South Vietnam in 1969, he wanted to read as much about the country and the war as he could, so that he could better understand what just happened to his teen years. More recently he wanted to have a better understanding of the South Vietnamese Army (ARVN), so a little research brought him to author Andrew Wiest’s excellent 2008 work “Vietnam’s Forgotten Army”, which chronicles the heroism and betrayal in the ARVN.

While this book is primarily suited for historians and for those of us that were there, it is an excellent accounting over its 303 pages of the good, bad, and ugly of that time period. It focuses on three leaders of the ARVN, men that should there have been more like them, would have probably won this war. Those leaders are General Ngo Quang Truong, Lt. Colonel Pham Van Dinh, and Major Tran Ngoc Hue. The story follows their military careers and life following the end of the war, as well as their interactions with their American military advisors.

For this reader, the chapters on the 1968 Tet Offensive, the battle of Hamburger Hill (Dong Ap Bia), Operation Lam Son 719, and the 1972 Spring-Summer (Easter) Offensive where especially helpful in understanding the role the ARVN had played in these battles, whose role has not previously been fully documented.

At times the book was difficult to read, because one tends to reflect back to those days, and it took longer to read, because of the constant need to Google items related to the story. And one is reminded that this was a war that did not need to be fought, should the United States had taken a different position following WWII and backed Ho Chi Minh and not the French.

This reader has been fortunate to have returned to Vietnam multiple times for business and it was especially humbling during a technology exhibition in Hanoi to have met many former North Vietnamese that were in uniform the same time I was. As for Saigon, it was always disturbing to see former soldiers of the ARVN sitting in parks without real occupations, simply because their side lost. As one ARVN soldier asked, why did the United States depart South Vietnam after 17 years or so, and yet maintains a military presence in South Korea since the war ended in 1951. Good question.
Yar
I was a battalion and regimental senior advisor for 8 months in Vietnam and I found this book to be very accurate and to the point in all respects. It will give the reader a very good picture of this forgotten army which I was proud to serve in and for which I received my Combat Infantry Badge.