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e-Book Out of Place: A Memoir epub download

e-Book Out of Place: A Memoir epub download

Author: Edward W. Said
ISBN: 0394587391
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (September 14, 1999)
Language: English
Category: Professionals & Academics
Size ePUB: 1991 kb
Size Fb2: 1425 kb
Size DJVU: 1613 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 266
Format: docx mobi lrf rtf
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book Out of Place: A Memoir epub download

by Edward W. Said



Acclaim for edward w. said’s.

Acclaim for edward w. A voyage into a cruel, luxuriant, mysterious land called childhood, which makes Orientalists of us all. -Newsday. Said is in place among the truly important intellects of our century. Out of Place is an intensely moving act of reclamation and understanding, a portrait of a transcultural and often painful upbringing written with wonderful vividness and unsparing honesty. As an emotional document, Out of Place is a revelation. The deeply affecting testimony of one boy’s nearly relentless persecution by the world.

Home Edward W. Said Out of Place: A Memoir

Home Edward W. Said Out of Place: A Memoir. Out of place a memoir, . 8. Out of Place: A Memoir, . By contrast, I retain a strong impression of how unforecast and, I gathered from something my father said, how anticlimactic our first view of North America was, owing to the wind and fog that pushed us unexpectedly far north: it was early in the morning two or three days before the New York landfall that the two of us went up on deck. But much of it took place in some complicated labyrinth of her own making, which also involved the arrangements she was making for herself and my four sisters, whom she would be alone with after I left

Home Edward W. 9. But much of it took place in some complicated labyrinth of her own making, which also involved the arrangements she was making for herself and my four sisters, whom she would be alone with after I left. There was something so terribly giving about her attitude in the last week before we packed the house for the first stage of our trip via Lebanon.

Out of Place: a Memoir. His idea, it was claimed, was to misrepresent himself as an "exile" from Palestine. One can understand why certain people should feel themselves compelled to stoop to such shoddy tactics with regard to Said: his voice is one of the sanest, most articulate and plausible availabe to the Palestinians

Out of Place: a memoir, Edward W. Said Edward Said was born in Jerusalem, and brought up in Cairo, spending every summer in the Lebanese mountain village of Dhour el Shweir, until he was banished to America in 1951.

Out of Place: a memoir, Edward W. This work is a mixture of emotional archaeology and memory, exploring an essentially irrecoverable past. As ill health sets him thinking about endings, Edward Said returns to his beginnings in this personal memoir. Edward W. Said was born in 1935 in Jerusalem, raised in Jerusalem and Cairo, and educated in the United States, where he attended Princeton (. 1957) and Harvard (. Possibly the best-known Arab American intellectual of his generation, Said (English and comparative literature, Columbia Univ. In 1963, he began teaching at Columbia University, where he was University Professor of English and Comparative Literature.

ellian, Shalom-of very mixed provenance, all of them preceded by dangling, not to say irrelevant, first initials: Salama, C, and Salama, A, for instance, or Zaki, whose. Two first initials served as a mockingly reversed and cacophonous sobriquet for him, Zaki .

Out of Place reveals an unimaginable world of rich, colorful characters, of exotic . Out of Place won the New Yorker Book Award for nonfiction in 2000.

Out of Place reveals an unimaginable world of rich, colorful characters, of exotic eastern landscapes. Lyrical and beautifully crafted, it is often extremely frank as well as intimate and humorous. Said has exposed a most personal past, letting us observe the people who formed him and who enabled him to triumph as one of the most important intellectuals of our time. Said is University Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is the author of seventeen books, including Orientalism, which was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award.

Out of Place is an extraordinary story of exile, a narrative of many departures, a celebration of an irrecoverable past. A fatal medical diagnosis in 1991 convinced Edward Said that he should leave a record of where he was born and spent his childhood, and so with this memoir he rediscovers the Arab landscape of his early years--"the many places and people [who] no longer exist . . . Essentially a lost world." Vast changes occurred as Palestine became Israel, Lebanon was transformed by twenty years of civil war, and the colonial Egypt of King Farouk disappeared forever by 1952.         Born in Jerusalem in 1935, Said was the only son in a prosperous family of five children. His ferociously demanding father upheld many Victorian values and ideals, and his adoring mother inspired his love of music, theater, and literature. His aunt Nabiha gave him his first sense of what it meant to leave Palestine, something never discussed by the family. Said writes with great passion and wit about his family and his friends--from schools in Cairo and summers in the mountains above Beirut to, as he grew older, camp in Maine, boarding school in Massachusetts, and college at Princeton University. Underscoring all is the confusion of identity as Said had to come to terms with the dissonance of being an American citizen, a Christian and a Palestinian, and, ultimately, an outsider.        Out of Place reveals an unimaginable world of rich, colorful characters, of exotic eastern landscapes. Lyrical and beautifully crafted, it is often extremely frank as well as intimate and humorous. Said has exposed a most personal past, letting us observe the people who formed him and who enabled him to triumph as one of the most important intellectuals of our time.Out of Place won the New Yorker Book Award for nonfiction in 2000.
Tebei
I had never read Said and fell in love with him, and this book. His insights into the world of The Other -- a world I've inhabited basically forever -- are brilliant and poignant. Half-way through the book, I learned Said had died, which made me very sad, since I'd wanted to write to him.
caif
I very much connected with this book where Edward Said is narrating with great sincerity his feelings and interactions with the details influenced him and his upbringing as an Arab, Christian from rich family yet of Palestinian origin. Said reflects on his family chosen solitude and his own struggle to define himself across different worlds. The complexity of his relationship with his both parents,how he perceived them and how they placed their heavy expectations on his shoulders . The most touching parts for me where Said expresses intelligently the sorrow of losing a country the palace to come back to and how he transfers the sorrow in to creativity maintaining uncertainty and the capacity to question.
Fohuginn
This is a remarkable work of a truly fascinating man. Much of the memoir is dedicated to Edward Said's relationship with his mother and father. Said recounts the history of his father, a Palestinian, who went to America and possibly fought for it in the First World War. The father Wadie, later returned to Palestine and then moved on to Cairo to establish a great business success. The father comes across very typical Middle Eastern conservative authority figure with a rather peculiar but very strong American patriotism.
Said's mother, comes across as a truly fascinating woman; a Palestinian Lebanese Christian, who possessed a great passion for music, literature and original thought. In the tradition of the Middle Eastern mothers she had a large presence in the lives of her children. She was an original woman, who felt comfortable amongst the many different cultures of the middle east, yet held on to her views, which at times were at odds with her environment.
Said tells of the huge influence his mother had over him during her life and even after her death. The story of the mother's search for a passport, a nationality, her dislike of life in America, her eventual death in America are beautifully told by Said. The mother's early conversion to Nasser's cause is mentioned, it even alienated the mother from her Lebanese family, but Said never tells us where it led.
I loved Said's self analysis relating his behavior to his mother: "...I seem to have absorbed her worries, her tireless concern for details, her inability ever to be calm, her way of constantly interrupting herself, preventing a continuous flow of attention or concentration on anything." Said is capable of very vivid language indeed.
The school life of Said in Cairo is fascinating. He attended English Colonial schools, American and Egyptian schools in Cairo and eventually moved on to Massachusetts, Princeton and Harvard. Much of his pre college school life was problematic, at times there is too much dwelling and self-pity but it is largely interesting. On a week trip, with his mother, that for some not clearly explained reason left him indifferent to Egyptian Monuments, he says " ....I was relieved of the pressure and the continual anxiety of not getting anything right."
The "out of place" theme is repeated throughout the book, at times very eloquently told, " ...the habit of always being dressed differently from the natives, any natives." I do however find it remarkable that Said does not also seem to see how well he did apparently fit everywhere outside of his early Colonial school. In fact, from his stories at the American School in Cairo, Princeton, Harvard and mostly Victoria College in Cairo, you often see a fairly popular kid with many friends.
I laughed out loud at the part describing his episode of revisiting Victoria College in 1989. He bribed his way in to show his family his old classroom, and later got thrown out by a woman wearing an "Islamic-style dress". Said proceeds to describe Victoria College in 89 as a "privileged Islamic sanctuary" that expelled him twice. The fact that the first time he got expelled was due to punching a kid and sending him to the hospital for a week and the second through trespassing both by his own admission does not seem to matter, in both cases, to him it was discrimination. Victoria College is a million miles away from being an Egyptian Islamic sanctuary, with a mixed high school. Said's self pity and righteousness is a times reminiscent of the Maggie Thatcher memoir, well no, not 10% as bad but it does detract a bit from the book.
There is one thing I hated about the book. Where is part two? Edward Said gives you so much detail about his early pre political life. I read this book, because I often find myself at odds with Edward Said's political views, I wanted to know more about the man. I thoroughly enjoyed "Out of Place" but it has not satisfied my desire to understand his viewpoint. I often thought that he simply fails to understand Egyptians and Egyptian attitudes but had no idea how much time he actually lived there.
This is a great book, very enjoyable and full of reflection. I gave it 4 stars only because as much as I loved it I could not bring myself to give it an identical rating to Leila Ahmed's Border Passage.
Uthergo
So sad we lost this brilliant mind way too soon. This is different from anything else he wrote. It tells the story of his childhood, who he was and where he came from with unbelievable candor.
AfinaS
This book provides insights into the people, places and experiences that shaped the man and his ideas. I believe he is trying to provide the backdrop for how his thoughts were shaped in the numerous books he produced over the years. This is not a summary or crescendo of the big ideas he worked on or through over the course of his life.
Zargelynd
Interesting perspective on an incredible author. The prose is not as compelling as After the Last Sky, but if you care for Said's books this memoir is worth your time
Kelezel
Revelation of a life-long struggle riding in the ever changing waves of cultural - political, identity-destroying turmoil of his-our time, an autobiography of a great mind .
fascinating story, good writer, check out his daughter's book "looking for Palestine"