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e-Book The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades  Before Roe v. Wade epub download

e-Book The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade epub download

Author: Ann Fessler
ISBN: 0143038974
Pages: 362 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (June 26, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Specific Groups
Size ePUB: 1893 kb
Size Fb2: 1771 kb
Size DJVU: 1908 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 414
Format: doc mobi txt azw
Subcategory: Biography

e-Book The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade epub download

by Ann Fessler



An adoptee who was herself surrendered during those years and recently . I was one if those girls back in 1965 This book is a must read for anyone who has gone through this and still feels the shame and loss! It changed my life!! Thank-you Ann!

An adoptee who was herself surrendered during those years and recently made contact with her mother. I was one if those girls back in 1965. For decades I didn't talk about my "past" because I couldn't get over the "shame" of what I did and the horrible sense of loss I felt. I didn't know anyone who would understand what it was like until I read this book. It validated everything I had experienced. Fourteen years ago I was able to meet the son I had never seen or touched. This book is a must read for anyone who has gone through this and still feels the shame and loss! It changed my life!! Thank-you Ann!

The unmarried women who felt compelled to give up their babies in the 1950s and 1960s were, for decades, ignored and silenced. Like, that's not even hyperbole

The unmarried women who felt compelled to give up their babies in the 1950s and 1960s were, for decades, ignored and silenced. Records were sealed; records were altered; letters were discarded, etc. And so I came to see what seemed like unnecessary and tedious repetition in Fessler's work as the author's way of giving each woman who wanted/needed to tell her story a chance to be "heard. Repetition is sometimes the only option when "Attention must be paid" (Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman). Like, that's not even hyperbole. The Girls Who Went Away is not a book about adoption, per se. It's a book This wasn't a book I expected to surprise me, but it did.

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Includes bibliographical references and index. This book brings to light the lives of . million single American women in the years following World War II who, under enormous social and family pressure, were coerced to give up their newborn children.

In this deeply moving and myth-shattering work, Ann Fessler brings out into the open for the first time the astonishing untold history of the million and a half women who surrendered children for adoption due to enormous family and social pressure in the decades before Roe v. Wade. An adoptee who was herself surrendered during those years and recently made contact with her mother, Ann Fessler brilliantly brings to life the voices of more than a hundred women, as well as the spirit of those times, allowing the women to tell their stories in gripping and intimate detail.

An adoptee who was herself surrendered during those years and recently made contact with her mother, Ann Fessler brilliantly brings to life the voices of more than a hundred women, as well as the spirit of those times, allowing the women to tell their stories in gripping and intimate detail. com/?book 0143038974).

The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. A wrenching, riveting book. Ann Fessler was nearly 56 when she first met her biological mother, who was 75. By then Fessler had already collected more than 100 oral histories for The Girls Who Went Away. She knew that those girls - pregnant, frightened and coerced into surrendering their babies for adoption - never came back from the experience, not really.

The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade is a 2006 book by Ann Fessler which describes and recounts the experiences of women in the United States who relinquished ba. . Wade is a 2006 book by Ann Fessler which describes and recounts the experiences of women in the United States who relinquished babies for adoption between 1950 and the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973.

A lovely history book (even for people who don't usually read history books) about a number of famous historic .

A lovely history book (even for people who don't usually read history books) about a number of famous historic women, and how traditional history has misrepresented their lives. June's book is Scandalous Women: The lives and loves of history's most notorious women by Elizabeth Kerri Mahon. The club will meet on June . You'll get a geography lesson and also a glimpse of the abuse the Family Members endured while under their "Prophet" David Berg.

A powerful and groundbreaking revelation of the secret history of the . million women who surrendered children for adoption in the several decades before Roe v. In this deeply moving work, Ann Fessler brings to light the lives of hundreds of thousands of young single American women forced to give up their newborn children in the years following World War II and before Roe v. Wade

In this deeply moving and myth-shattering work, Ann Fessler brings out into the open for the first time the astonishing untold history of the million and a half women who surrendered children for adoption due to enormous family and social pressure in the decades before Roe v. Wade. An adoptee who was herself surrendered during those years and recently made contact with her mother, Ann Fessler brilliantly brings to life the voices of more than a hundred women, as well as the spirit of those times, allowing the women to tell their stories in gripping and intimate detail.
Iesha
This book was recommended to me by a friend who is an adoptee when my older sister located me through a genealogy DNA test. My family had no idea she even existed, and as my mother passed years ago, there was no way to get answers.
Why would this woman, a wonderful, loving, mother, give a child away and not tell us? What happened that she would take a secret like that to the grave? How could her family not have any idea? This book explained exactly why, how, and what was happening in our society in 1964, when my mother signed away her rights to her firstborn child.
It also gave me an insight into why my mother was the way she was. Why she insisted my little sister and I use birth control, going so far as to take us to the doctor for the pill, at a time when it was NOT the thing parents were doing. Why she had a yearly cycle of depression centered around the time that we now know is our older sister’s birthday. Why she never told my father, who she met not long after she gave that baby up. And other pieces, bits of information and things she said that didn’t seem that strange at the time, but looking back meant something so very different and helped put together a puzzle we never knew was there.
I’m not known for being overly emotional about things, but this was very difficult for me to read, even knowing in advance the kind of societal pressures on single women of that era. I kept having to walk away for a while after reading this chapter or that story, because it was bringing everything too close for me to handle. My mother was one of these women, and although I knew she’d had an abusive childhood, I had no inkling that she had suffered this injustice as well.
Even if you aren’t connected to anyone who may have been touched by this shameful era of our history, this book is a great opportunity to learn the reasons why women’s rights continues to be such an important movement, even today. We can’t let these kinds of things continue to happen 50 or even 60 years later.
Gna
I never thought a lot about my own adoption. I was always told that she couldn't take care of me and that's why I was put up for adoption to be placed with a better family. We only spoke about it a few times, and it was taboo bringing up the subject. After reading the book I was able to feel compassion for my birth mother and it opened my eyes how society played a big role in the decision. I was absolutely shocked at 50 years old. I never realized how badly young women were treated and especially out of wedlock. The author was also adopted and was very insightful. For the first time in my life, I can honestly say I don't feel bad about being adopted anymore.
Era
I have been searching for my birth family since I was 18, over 30 years. Finally having an inter-mediator find my birth mother this last week, my birth mother was shocked that I wanted contact with her, she never told her spouse or other children. So the inter-mediator suggested that she read this book. So I decided to read it also. Wow, was I enlightened. Being one of 4 adopted, we always knew we were adopted. I always wondered through the years why she never tried to find me or why she even gave me up.
This book really helped me understand it from her perspective.
It is a must read!
SoSok
I am of the generation affected, I remember girls who went away. The ones I knew seemed far different after they returned to school. And the rumors always went around anyways. I guess the girl's parents always thought they were keeping everything hush-hush. Yet sometimes the girl herself would return to school and tell her close friends where she had actually been. And of course, those friends told other friends, and those friends told... Sometimes the boy involved would leave school also. Especially if he or his parents didn't want him to be pressured into a quickie wedding.

This very well written book accurately tells it like it was. The saddest part of all of it is that there still remain children and birth parents who have never met. I had a good friend who was a victim of this. And I say victim because I believe far too many of the children grew up with an internal feeling of having been abandoned - no matter how wonderful the adoptive parents were. Plus the unfortunate reality of life is that all adoptive parents are not wonderful, any more than all birth parents are wonderful.

This is a worthwhile read for anyone who wants to get a clear picture of what the world was like for women pre "Women's lib".
Fordrellador
I was one if those girls back in 1965. For decades I didn't talk about my "past" because I couldn't get over the "shame" of what I did and the horrible sense of loss I felt. I didn't know anyone who would understand what it was like until I read this book. It validated everything I had experienced. Fourteen years ago I was able to meet the son I had never seen or touched. He was 33 years old.I had tried to explain what the times were like in 1965/1966 to my son (as well as to my other adult daughter and son) but it was difficult for them to comprehend. The times had changed a lot! When I read a review of this book in People magazine I ordered it immediately. In places I felt like I was reading my own biography. As soon as I finished reading it (in record time) I turned back to the first page and read it again...this time highlighting passages that were important to me. I gave that copy to my son & insisted that my other two children read it too. It changed everything! All of them said that at times they were brought to tears at how horrible those times were and now they could better understand what I went through. The wonderful man I had married in 1968 never once judged me and supported my desire to find my son. This book is a must read for anyone who has gone through this and still feels the shame and loss! It changed my life!! Thank-you Ann!