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e-Book Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain epub download

e-Book Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain epub download

Author: Li Keng Wong
ISBN: 1561453676
Pages: 136 pages
Publisher: Peachtree Publishers (March 30, 2006)
Language: English
Category: Biographies
Size ePUB: 1138 kb
Size Fb2: 1712 kb
Size DJVU: 1339 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 965
Format: mbr mobi lrf lrf
Subcategory: Children

e-Book Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain epub download

by Li Keng Wong



Start by marking Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain. Gum Saan means Gold Mountain in Chinese. It also means the United States. To all of us children in our rural village in China, Gold Mountain seemed like a magical place that was very, very far away

Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain. In 1933, seven-year-old Li Keng’s life changed forever. To all of us children in our rural village in China, Gold Mountain seemed like a magical place that was very, very far away. All the other families in our village have a father at home, I went on. But we don’t, and I don’t like it.

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Good Fortune by Li Keng Wong is a great example of an autobiographical book. Once I started the book, I felt like I was with Li every step of the way. Li tells about her journey to "Gold Mountain" and the obstacles she faced as a Chinese girl in the United States. Her journey begins when Li's father has arranged for her, Mama, and her two sisters to come join him in Gold Mountain. They agree and are sent on a remarkable adventure half-way across the world. When they reach their destination, Li and her family have to endure the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Great Depression. To survive, her dad has no choice but to open up an illegal lottery shop.

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What is streets paved with gold. Why do the girls like one of the unlucky, haunted houses the family moves to? Why is they sleep in their own bed with a mattress. 200. How long did Baba wait to visit mama when she left the family so it would look like she was really the girls' aunt instead of their mother? When is after two weeks.

She has published her experiences in the acclaimed book, "Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain," and gives presentations on her American experience around the United States.

In this dramatic memoir of early-twentieth century immigration, the author shares her family's difficult but ultimately triumphant journey from their small village in rural China, through detention and interrogation at Angel Island, to a new life in Oakland's Chinatown. THE YEAR IS 1933, and seven-year-old Li Keng's life is about to change forever. Her father has decided to bring his family from a small village in southern China to "Gold Mountain," the United States. California. Now Li Keng, Mama, and her two sisters will embark on a remarkable journey that will take them halfway around the world. Getting to America is not easy. The family travels by foot, by train, and by boat. Even more difficult is getting past America's strict anti-Chinese immigration laws. To do so, the family must keep secrets and offer well-rehearsed lies to American officials. The Gees are detained for processing along with other Asian immigrants at Angel Island, in San Francisco Bay. The conditions are harsh and uncertainty and fear hang in the air. Any misstep could mean deportation. Life in America during the Great Depression brings many exciting surprises as well as a few disappointments. Li Keng loves the American school she attends each day and she makes friends with other children in her neighborhood. Hunger, poverty, police raids, frequent moves, and the occasional sting of racism are a part of everyday life, but slowly Li Keng and her family find stability and a true home in "Gold Mountain." An author's note contains photos and an update on her family. The book contains information on Angel Island and its significance in history as well as an explanation of the Chinese Exclusion Act
It's so easy
Love the book, as an immigrant, the story makes me cry. Can't forget this journal. love it love it love it
Cerar
Interesting book. Good hard copy quality.!!
Kamuro
Li Keng Wong, Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain (Peachtree, 2006)

I have never been a big fan of the memoir, and with the recent market glut, chances are, when one picks up a random memoir, one will end up opening the window and summarily ejecting it, unless one needs to line one's birdcage or is short of toilet paper. That said, every once in a while you get lucky. And while I don't think anyone will ever confuse Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain with deathless literature, at least it won't get mixed up with deathly boring literature, either.

The majority of memoirs I've read recently have fed on the public's fascination with humiliation, of self and of others. And while Li Keng Wong went through some rather nasty stuff during the period of her childhood she relates here, she never gives into that tabloid sort of impulse. With that alone, she's already well ahead of the pack. It also helps somewhat that this is a book written for school-agers (I'd say middle school, or bright elementary school students); Ms. Wong gets down to brass tacks pretty quick, and then stays there, without any of the aimless meanderings one sees in recent works by, for example, Melissa P. (One Hundred Strokes of the Brush Before Bed) or Craig Thompson (Blankets). She's got a story to tell, and she tells it, and that's that. She also avoids the trap of overplaying her hand at any given time; this would be all too easy a thing to do, given that part of this memoir covers her stay in an interment camp courtesy of the Chinese Exclusion Act. But Ms. Wong writes of the stay in the detention camp as one more stopping place on the greater adventurous path her family took. I ended up a lot more fond of this book than I expected to be, and unhesitatingly recommend it. *** ½
Kirizius
Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain is the autobiography of Li Keng Wong. Born in the village of Goon Do Hung, Li Keng has never known her father, Baba, since he is working in Gum Saan (aka United States "Gold Mountain"). Along with her older sister, Li Hong, and her younger sister, Lai Wah, Li Keng's life is one of pleasant simplicity and anticipation. The family is waiting for Baba to write a letter telling them that he's returning to bring them back to America. When the letter finally arrives, there is much preparation as the family prepares to pass their interrogation on Angel Island. Because of the strict laws, the family must lie convincingly to officials in order to enter the country. Li Keng and her family hope that America truly is a place with gold-paved streets, but will the new land bring hope or disappointment?

Li Keng's story covers a vast period of time. The first half of the book concentrates on the year before they come to America (1933), the second half of the book concentrates on the struggles, disappointments, and hopes once they arrive (1934-1941). The story is interesting, yet narrated unevenly. It is an honest portrayal of an immigration story--the hardships, poverty, etc. Still I would recommend this book as a good autobiography for younger readers in third to sixth grades.
Shadowbourne
Good Fortune by Li Keng Wong is a great example of an autobiographical book. Li tells about her journey to "Gold Mountain" and the obstacles she faced as a Chinese girl in the United States.

Her journey begins when Li's father has arranged for her, Mama, and her two sisters to come join him in Gold Mountain. They agree and are sent on a remarkable adventure half-way across the world. When they reach their destination, Li and her family have to endure the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Great Depression. To survive, her dad has no choice but to open up an illegal lottery shop. If he keeps getting arrested, all of them could be sent back to China.

I liked this book because of the detail in every sentence. It really changed the way I thought about history in 1933. Once I started the book, I felt like I was with Li every step of the way.

Yin A.
Grade 6
Ms. Kawatachi
Cozius
I came across Good Fortune: My Journey to Gold Mountain as I searched for memoirs to recommend for the 6th grade curriculum in the school district where I teach. I was very disappointed by this book, and honestly mystified by the 4 and 5 star reviews it's received so far. The author recounts her family's immigration from China to the United States. The story moves along breezily and blandly until about page 65 when the first hint of hardship occurs- The author recalls her devastation at hearing of the sudden death of her grandmother. However, 2 very non-descript paragraphs the incident is entirely forgotten, eclipsed by cheerful and completely uninteresting reminiscences.

The family spends a few weeks detained at the Angel Island immigration center in San Francisco. But reading this book one gets no sense at all of the hardship a child imprisoned may feel. The only preoccupation that the writer shares is her nervousness at facing an interview board at the immigration center. How did that go? Oh, just fine, it turns out. No big deal. Later in the book, she speaks of a violent crime committed against her family. But it is given similarly short shrift.

The family has multiple female children. Not until their 6th child is a boy born. The author is troubled by her mother's complaints about bearing only girls. But this form of sexism, which adolescent readers could really sink their teeth into if given the chance to think about it, is not compellingly presented. In fact, one gets barely a taste of Chinese culture reading this book. What a disappointment.

From my point of view, this is an insult to adolescent readers. Students in middle school can handle some adversity in life and in literature. If this book has anything going for it, it's only that it is a quick read. But there is nothing meaty here to discuss with your students.