» » How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids
e-Book How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids epub download

e-Book How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids epub download

Author: Thomas C Foster
ISBN: 0062200860
Pages: 176 pages
Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (May 7, 2013)
Language: English
Category: Education & Reference
Size ePUB: 1781 kb
Size Fb2: 1937 kb
Size DJVU: 1611 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 450
Format: rtf docx azw txt
Subcategory: Children

e-Book How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids epub download

by Thomas C Foster



Thomas C. Foster is Professor of English at the University of Michigan, Flint, where he teaches classes in contemporary fiction . Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Thomas C. Foster's books.

Thomas C. Foster is Professor of English at the University of Michigan, Flint, where he teaches classes in contemporary fiction, drama, and poetry as we. .

Start by marking How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For .

Start by marking How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. After truly enjoying Foster's books for adults, How to Read Literature Like a Professor" and "How to Read Novels Like a Professor", I was set to enjoy this book and give it high marks as well. I knew there would be no new revelations which weren't in the adult books, and that was not what I was after what? So my daughter was assigned Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor as her summer reading in high school (she's in advanced classes). I bought the eBook and said I'd read it with her. Well, she finished but I fizzled.

While many books can be enjoyed for their basic stories, there are often deeper literary meanings interwoven in these texts

While many books can be enjoyed for their basic stories, there are often deeper literary meanings interwoven in these texts. How to Read Literature Like a Professor helps us to discover those hidden truths by looking at literature with the eyes-and the literary codes-of the ultimate professional reader: the college professor. What does it mean when a literary hero travels along a dusty road? When he hands a drink to his companion?

How to Read Literature Like a Professor How to Read Literature Like a Professor A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines THOMAS C. FOSTER. p. 1 OKAY, SO HERE’S THE DEAL: let’s say, purely hypothetically, you’re reading a book about an average sixteen-year-old kid in the summer of 1968. The kid-let’s call him Kip-who hopes his acne clears up before he gets drafted, is on his way to the A&P. His bike is a one-speed with a coaster brake and therefore deeply humiliating, and riding it to run an errand for his mother makes it even worse.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For .

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids. Foster makes learning this important skill fun and exciting by using examples from How the Grinch Stole Christmas to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, from short stories and poems to movie scripts. This go-to guide unlocks all the hidden secrets to reading, making it entertaining and satisfying. More by Thomas C Foster. How to Read Nonfiction Like a Professor: Critical Thinking in the Age of Bias, Contested Truth, and Disinformation.

How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids. This book is like a key that helps you unlock the mysteries contained in literary works. It's easy to read and full of insights and helps you dissect the many meanings in literature

How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids. How to Read Poetry Like a Professor: A Quippy and Sonorous Guide to Verse. Twenty-five Books That Shaped America. It's easy to read and full of insights and helps you dissect the many meanings in literature. My only criticism is that the book is too short.

How to Read Literature Like a Professor is a New York Times bestseller by Thomas C. Foster that was published in 2003. The book brands itself as "A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines," and is commonly used throughout advanced English courses in America. The book also includes sample interpretations of Katherine Mansfield's short story, "The Garden Party".

While many books can be enjoyed for their basic stories, there are often deeper literary meanings interwoven in these texts.

The go-to bestselling guide to help young people navigate from a middle school book report to English Comp 101

In How to Read Literature Like a Professor: For Kids, New York Times bestselling author and professor Thomas C. Foster gives tweens the tools they need to become thoughtful readers.

With funny insights and a conversational style, he explains the way writers use symbol, metaphor, characterization, setting, plot, and other key techniques to make a story come to life.

From that very first middle school book report to that first college course, kids need to be able to understand the layers of meaning in literature. Foster makes learning this important skill fun and exciting by using examples from How the Grinch Stole Christmas to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, from short stories and poems to movie scripts.

This go-to guide unlocks all the hidden secrets to reading, making it entertaining and satisfying.

mr.Mine
I am a huge fan of the original book. I own 60 copies and I use it to teach English10 Honors. It's an excellent resource, but two things drive my students crazy:

1. Foster cultivates a voice that's cheeky to the point of arrogance.
2. Foster's examples are so esoteric that they've rarely read them and they get lost in the long explanations about them.

When I saw this book, I thought: Aha! Change the examples and the tone for kids. PERFECT.

But nope. While *some* of the examples have changed, they've changed to things like Dr. Seuss. Not exactly appropriate for my audience. And the tone--even much of the language and many of the examples--is exactly the same.

PLUS, he's gotten rid of the "sex" chapters--two chapters that would have done best with a genuine makeover, and two chapters that are essential to navigating some of the banned/challenged books on our booklist.

Bummer.
JoJoshura
This book is great--I had my principal order a class set to use in my high school English classes. The author goes through specific patterns that students can look for in literature, and what those patterns often mean. This makes it very concrete for students, so they can do more abstract thinking.

The title says "for kids" but I would recommend this book for no younger than seventh grade (~12 or 13 years old). The stories and books the author references are more appropriate for secondary students.
Precious
My granddaughter’s freshman class is using this book. I bought a copy in order to be able to help her with advice, if need be. One of the first thing’s my granddaughter said to me was, “This book is NOT for kids!” After I read it, I have to agree. While not specific, it does discuss sex in books and symbols that represent sex (e.g. marriage) and other topics beyond the experience of most elementary age children.

It’s written in language an eight-year-old could easily understand, but some of the examples and discussions are on topics that are likely beyond the average student in 3rd or 4th grade. The last example in the book would bore them to tears. I’ve worked with children of various ages throughout the years, my daughter is a teacher, and I’ve heard students’ discussions with peers, all of which form the basis of my opinion.

All of that said, I believe it’s an excellent book, and totally appropriate for ninth graders. It probably is too easy a book for upper classmen, but this is a book that likely has something new for many students. Instead of ages 8-12, I’d set the ages to 10-14.
Uyehuguita
Don't be fooled by the title, kids- This is not a boring book. Of course, it's not a very exciting read, but it doesn't contain page after page after page of B, O, R, I, N, G. It's really fun to read, mostly because it's slightly funny, but also because it's literally learning how to make connections between pretty much every book that was ever written- Like a giant conspiracy theory. But I know what you're thinking. "But I don't wanna read a long book about literature! Who wants to study about BOOKS?! For-" Okay, that's quite enough. As I said, it's not boring. Also, this book is more of a branching tutorial on the study of literature. Because, seriously, no one is going to write a five hundred page piece of literature describing literature? I mean, maybe uncle Morty, but... Anyway, this book is extremely useful, and it's not just for kids, despite the title. If you want to impress your English teacher... Give this book a try. Or don't. I can't force you too, but- Hey. Might just improve your grade a bit. Or a lot.
Leyl
(I'm 14 writing this on my mom's account)
this book teaches you how to not only read into books more deeply, but how to write more meaningful stories.It shows you how to intelligently compare books and see how all stories are the same in some aspects. I found this pretty helpful, although some of the examples seemed a little inappropriate for the age group this was trying to appeal to. I doubt many kids have read books like Dracula or a lot of the other works referenced in this book. Even I have never heard of many of the books he talks about, and I am a few years over the suggested age range for this book and LOVE reading. In short, this is a good book, but just doesn't seem like its targeting the right age. It seems like it would be more useful to teenagers, maybe 13 or 14 year olds to 16 year olds. Teenagers might understand the references and be more familiar with the stories this book mentions.
Mitynarit
Though it's not the most well-written book I've ever read (which is a little surprising), it does present some interesting perspectives on literature. My sixth-grade students really enjoyed the few chapters that we read together.

My biggest complaint is the chapter on vampires as sexual beings. I'm not opposed to that, nor do I disagree; however, that single chapter keeps me from being able to use this book as a free resource in my classroom. While most of the chapters are perfectly usable for bright middle-schoolers, the sexual nature of that chapter "ruins" it. At least at my school.

If you have a child who really loves literature (not just reading, but thinking about), then this book will probably be interesting to him or her. But, make sure you are ok with the chapter on vampires.

Maybe it should have been called "How To Read Literature Like A Professor: For Teens"?
Eta
As an adult, I enjoyed reading this book. I read the chapter on quests to my homeschooled fifth graders, and I think they learned from it. Mostly, however, I think it's for a bit older age level than fifth/sixth grade, so we will hold off on the remainder.
Definitely for kids. My son was assigned this for high school he felt it was meant for a much younger audience.