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e-Book Fifteen Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children epub download

e-Book Fifteen Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children epub download

Author: Michael Rutter
ISBN: 0674300262
Pages: 296 pages
Publisher: Harvard University Press (March 15, 1982)
Language: English
Category: Schools & Teaching
Size ePUB: 1325 kb
Size Fb2: 1424 kb
Size DJVU: 1826 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 638
Format: lit txt docx txt
Subcategory: Education

e-Book Fifteen Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children epub download

by Michael Rutter



New York: Basic Books. Rutter, Michael, Maughan, Barbara, Mortimore, Peter and Ouston, Janet (1979).

Jencks, Christopher, Smith, Marshall, Acland, Henry, Bane, Mary Jo, Cohen, David, Gintis, Herbert, Heyns, Barbara and Michelson, Stephan (1972). Inequality: A Reassessment of the Effect of Family and Schooling in America. New York: Basic Books. Fifteen Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and their Effects on Children.

In Fifteen Thousand Hours, Michael Rutter and his colleagues show conclusively that schools can make a difference. In a three-year study of a dozen secondary schools in a large urban area, Rutter's team found that some schools were demonstrably better than others at promoting the academic and social success of their students.

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Fifteen Thousand Hours Secondary Schools&Their Effects on Children (Paper) ISBN:9780674300262. Издательство: "Неизвестный" (1979). См. также в других словарях: United States - a republic in the N Western Hemisphere comprising 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, and Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the N Pacific. 267,954,767; conterminous United States, 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); wit. Universalium. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, country in N. America.

Fifteen Thousand Hours book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Fifteen Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Fifteen Thousand Hours. Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children. 3. The Schools and the Area They Serve. 5. School Outcomes: Children’s Attendance, Behaviour and Attainments. 6. Physical and Administrative Features of Schools: Associations with Outcome. 7. School Processes: Associations with Outcome. 8. Ecological Influences.

Fifteen Thousand Hours : Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children. In Fifteen Thousand Hours, Michael Rutter and his colleagues show conclusively that schools can make a difference.

Fifteen thousand hours: Secondary schools and their effect on children, Open books. Deanna M. & Vivek K. (2000). Measuring peer pressure, popularity and conformity in adolescent boys and girls: Predicting school performance, sexual attitudes and substance abuse. Journal of youth and adolescence, 29 (2), 163. Scheerens.

Book Publishing WeChat. Rutter, . Maughan, . Mortimer, . & Ousten, J. (1979). Fifteen-Thousand Hours: Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Furthermore, the Greek teacher’s resilience has been influenced by the economic crisis at a moderate level.

Secondary Schools and Their Effects on Children. Michael Rutter is a psychiatrist who is a sociologist. It's a rare combination. This particular book is widely cited in the resiiency literature, yet few have read it outside of graduate courses.

Can a good school help its students overcome the adverse effects of economic disadvantage and family adversity? Recent educational assessment suggests that the answer may be a painful no. Here, however, is a book that contradicts the prevailing pessimism about the possibilities of education. In Fifteen Thousand Hours, Michael Rutter and his colleagues show conclusively that schools can make a difference.

In a three-year study of a dozen secondary schools in a large urban area, Rutter's team found that some schools were demonstrably better than others at promoting the academic and social success of their students. Moreover, there were clear and interesting differences between the schools that promote success and the schools that promote failure. As Rutter shows, these differences provide important clues to the kind of educational reform that might allow inner-city schools to act more uniformly as a positive and protective influence on students who must grow up in an otherwise disordered and difficult world.

For a dozen years during their formative period of development, children spend as many of their working hours at school as at home―some 15,000 hours in all. To suggest that this tremendous amount of time has no effect on development seems irrational. To settle for schools that simply act as institutions of containment for disadvantaged children seems a strategy of despair. The importance of this major book in education is its clear demonstration that these are not the only alternatives.