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e-Book Excellence : Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? epub download

e-Book Excellence : Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? epub download

Author: John W. Gardner
ISBN: 0060802235
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers (June 1, 1971)
Language: English
Category: Schools & Teaching
Size ePUB: 1751 kb
Size Fb2: 1796 kb
Size DJVU: 1527 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 462
Format: mobi txt rtf lit
Subcategory: Education

e-Book Excellence : Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? epub download

by John W. Gardner



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Excellence: Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? .

Excellence: Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? (1961). To Turn the Tide (1962). The John Gardner Fellowship Association is an association of John Gardner Fellowship alumni from both Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley, whose mission is to carry on Gardner's legacy of public service and ensure that the Fellowship programs at both schools have adequate resources for success.

In Excellence, Mr. Gardner discusses the strengths and failings of our educational system, our confusion over the idea of equality, and the nature of leadership in a free society. Finding Our Way Through Competing Values. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 9 years ago. This is a book about America's love for two competing values: competition and equality. As Americans, we enjoy seeing excellence rewarded. But also, we Americans enjoy equality and abhor inequality of result.

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John William Gardner (8 October 1912 – 16 February 2002) was President of the Carnegie Corporation and Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) under President Lyndon Johnson. The society which scorns excellence in plumbing as a humble activity and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is an exalted activity will have neither good plumbing nor good philosophy: neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water. Excellence: Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too?

Электронная книга "Excellence: Can We Be Equal And Excellent Too?", Dr. John W. Gardner.

Электронная книга "Excellence: Can We Be Equal And Excellent Too?", Dr. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Excellence: Can We Be Equal And Excellent Too?" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Can we be equal and excellent too? John W. Harper, New York, 1961. Science 24 Mar 1961: Vol. 133, Issue 3456, pp. 872-873 DOI: 1. 126/science. Can we be equal and excellent too? John W. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Science.

This is a book about excellence, more particularly about the conditions under which excellence is possible in our .

This is a book about excellence, more particularly about the conditions under which excellence is possible in our kind . .

Excellence, Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? – This book raised America’s standards. Mine too, says Bill. 2 best strategy books and how to succeed books recommended by Kevin. Live for Success, by John T. Malloy. Winning Through Intimidation, by Robert Ringer.

1971
Umi
History is usually taught as if it is primarily about something that happened in a quaint and very different time long ago. So it is hard to see what the big deal about history is. Almost nobody, even historians, looks at today and tries to imagine what today would look like to historians thirty years from now. Will they wonder why we were so blind to certain dangers? Marvel at how well we prepared for other risks?

This book was written many years ago, but is equally timely now. The author takes a fairly unsentimental look at American history from the point of view of what present danger we are neglecting to prepare for. His concerns mostly still make just as much sense as they did when the book was written. Some are bigger now, some a little more minor, but none have gone away completely. A few of the characters have changed, but the roles are the same. Many of the situations and concerns have recurred throughout US history,but the details are contemporary. The tone is optimistic but cautionary. The prescriptions for action are still mostly spot on.

The editing and proof reading are very bad, bad enough to make rereading necessary in many places.It appears that the text was scanned in either from a bad quality copy or with low Grace equipment and software, and either left with all the scanned mistakes or corrected by someone who did not understand what the book is about. If rereading sentences bothers you, try to get a different edition. The book is 5 stars, the edition is 2 stars. It is readable with a little imagination and a sense of humor, but it would be a fairly easy read if the proof reader had done a competent job.
Xlisiahal
Mark F. LaMoure, Boise, ID

"Excellence," by John W. Gardner is a grade "A" book. Mr. Gardner discusses the many strengths and failings of our educational system, our confusion over the idea of equality and the nature of leadership in a free society. This is a book about high standards. We must strive to be the best we can possibly be, as individuals and together as a society. A great book for academics and everyone.
Tat
This is a book about America's love for two competing values: competition and equality. As Americans, we enjoy seeing excellence rewarded. But also, we Americans enjoy equality and abhor inequality of result. In education, for instance, there is a constant struggle between 'standards based education' (treating all equally), and 'tracking' (adjusting students instruction to their competence level). In economic matters, we dislike seeing economic inequality but enjoy the industry and efficiency that 'meritocracy' creates.

How do we navigate these waters? That is what former US Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare John Gadner writes about.

The first chapters of this book are devoted to pointing out that these competing values of excellence and equality are both part of the American consciousness. The next few chapters, particularly one consisting of a brief overview of the Civil Rights Movement, details how holding these conflicting beliefs can lead to confusion between equality of opportunity and equality of result. (The Civil Rights movement, for instance, at once seeks equality of opportunity but is often forced to measure it via equality of result.)

The next several chapters outline how this dilemma of competing values affect the world of education, where we are often hesitant to rank students by ability but do not want to treat all children the same either. The disadvantages of ranking by ability are numerous: (a) what do we mean by 'ability' and who defines it? (b) do we run the risk of consigning kids to 'their fate' too soon and missing vital opportunities for growth? (c) do we run the risk of judging on things other than actual ability (family background, ethnic origin, etc)? But there are also disadvantages to treating students the same: (a) some students may be hurt by being in programs beyond their ability level; (b) other students of higher level may not reach their potential; (c) we run the risk of ignoring the great plurality of talents and abilities and force all students into one mold (generally "college prep" which results often in the "dumbing down" of college curricula).

These issues and more are gone through in this clearly written and concise (a little over 100 pages) book. Gardner's conclusion is that we strive, when possible, for a middle-road that tries to offer true equality of opportunity and incentive for merit while, at the same time, limiting the amount and effect of disparities of reward. Gardner writes poignantly against extreme visions of equality (forcing us into a sameness that ignores the benefits of diversity) and extreme forms of meritocracy (which would punish the disadvantaged for being disadvantaged). Gardner wants to see a middle approach that strives for a minimum of equality that is still compatible with human plurality and competition.

Maybe due to its brevity, I found that this book didn't often approach matters deeply but, in some ways, glossed through them. How much equality is compatible with diversity? How can we structure schools that (as Gardner wants) offer differentiated education suitable to each child's abilities while avoiding the potential to consign students to 'fates' prematurely? (He mentions an intriguing ' principle of multiple chances" for students but doesn't explicate what this means in practice.) In other words, Gardner writes convincingly that these values of excellence and equality are, in some sense, conflicting but doesn't really do too much by way of reconciling them, but to advocate a poorly-defined "middle way."

I give the book four stars though because of Gardner's clear writing, thoughtful examination (even without resolution), and the fact that this book is every bit as relevant today as it was in 1961.
Dorintrius
This is a great little book, that despite being quite old (early 60s, I think) is probably more germaine now than it was then.
Rainshaper
Superb insights on education. Debunks the left wing myth of equity and excellence.
Laitchai
Read this book years ago from the library at work - content has remained some of my favorite information. Pleased to get a copy of my own to refresh my memory - I was not disapointed! Excellent read. Lillian Greer
Tetaian
revised since the original.. not particularly for the better.
We must be. Read Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom next.