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e-Book A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain Wave Biofeedback epub download

e-Book A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain Wave Biofeedback epub download

Author: Jim Robbins
ISBN: 0871138077
Pages: 260 pages
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Pr; 1 edition (May 1, 2000)
Language: English
Category: Alternative Medicine
Size ePUB: 1387 kb
Size Fb2: 1794 kb
Size DJVU: 1634 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 654
Format: txt lrf mobi lrf
Subcategory: Health

e-Book A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain Wave Biofeedback epub download

by Jim Robbins



Jim Robbins gives us the story of brainwave biofeedback from the early pioneers in the 1970's to the blossoming in. .

Jim Robbins gives us the story of brainwave biofeedback from the early pioneers in the 1970's to the blossoming in the 1990's. It is written in the style of an in-depth journalist: interviews and history of the key players, how the stories unfold, and how these players interacted. Emerging science on the brain is now offering us an inside look at how imbalances in the brain can affect a teen’s moods, behavior, interpersonal relationships and academic performance. Depression, anxiety, emotional over-reactivity and impulse control challenges have begun to be addressed directly through brain regulation techniques, like Neurofeedback.

Jim Robbins gives us the story of brainwave biofeedback from the early pioneers in the 1970's to the blossoming in.This book starts strong but ends weakly. It is really about neurofeedback, not biofeedback, so the explanatory subtitle is actually quite misleading. But it's a good book overall. The book gives a good, not-too-technical understanding of how the techniques are performed. Even its weakness is helpful, in a way; it is weak because it tries to cover everything and everybody connected with neurofeedback.

Since A Symphony in the Brain was first published, the scientific understanding of our bodies, brains, and .

Since A Symphony in the Brain was first published, the scientific understanding of our bodies, brains, and minds has taken remarkable leaps. But biofeedback has faced battles for acceptance in the conservative medical world despite positive signs that it could revolutionize the way a diverse range of medical and psychological problems are treated.

Электронная книга "A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain Wave Biofeedback", Jim Robbins. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain Wave Biofeedback" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Jim Robbins' new book is a must read for anyone tracking the most promising new frontiers in science and . Called EEG biofeedback, or neurofeedback, the book describes the history of how this technology developed.

Jim Robbins' new book is a must read for anyone tracking the most promising new frontiers in science and healing. Neurofeedback or "braintraining" is a complicated offshoot of biofeedback, based on teaching all or parts of our brains to operate more effectively or at a desired frequency with new high tech brain monitoring and computer software programs.

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Paperback, 288 pages.

A revolutionary approach to treating brain disorders uses neurofeedback to tackle epilepsy, autism, ADD, addictions, and depression. 35,000 first printing.
Mbon
Do you want to know about neurofeedback? Where it came from? Is it s a fad? Or is it medical science? Jim Robbins gives us the story of brainwave biofeedback from the early pioneers in the 1970's to the blossoming in the 1990's. It is written in the style of an in-depth journalist: interviews and history of the key players, how the stories unfold, and how these players interacted. The book gives a good, not-too-technical understanding of how the techniques are performed.

The stories are rather amazing and in some cases incredible. Story after story of people with problems that are solved by a brainwave scanner and a rather simple user interface that simply lets the patient know the mode that the brain is performing in. Patients can modify their brain state, and it is the precise knowledge of brain state that allows patients to control the mode. For the most part the equipment is measuring and sensitive to the dominant global operating frequency of brain waves, but in some cases particular techniques are tuned to look at frequencies in particular parts of the brain.

The approach seems to applicable to a wide range of problems: ADHD, PTSD, anxiety attacks, substance abuse, epilepsy, shyness, and even plain old 'sports performance'. It is easy to believe that these kinds of things are affected by the brain entering into a "bad" mode of operation. Who of us has never been paralyzed by the fear of a looming deadline, unable to get past the writers-block, even though you know you should be moving forward? The brain is clearly letting fears (some modes of thinking) get in the way of work (other modes of thinking). Wouldn't it be great if you could be aware of these "bad" modes, and switch to good modes of thinking. Awareness is power. Interesting parallels are made between meditation and controlling the same rhythms inthe brain.

Should we be skeptical? I am both intrigued as well as cautious. The success rate seems (in a very non-rigorous way) to be around 90%. There are so many stories of people with debilitating problems who are effectively cured with a few treatments. Robbins points out that there is a dearth of controlled. double-blind scientific studies of the effects of the treatments. He covers some of the reasons for this: because it is just feedback, and the patient is in control, it does not fall under traditional 'treatments', it is not clear whether the FDA is responsible for this area or not, and widespread misunderstanding of consciousness and whether we should be meddling in it. The traditional medicine community shunned the approach most likely because some of the early work was done by people investigating mystical effects, yogis, and other new-age approaches from people who rejected the establishment in the first place. Many of the best cases are from parents of ADHD kids who rebelled against the mainstream and refused to dope their kids with Ritalin. You can't expect the AMA to look lightly at that. In one documented case funding was suddenly pulled from a study that would have lent a lot of credibility to the field: did the pharma industry pull the plug? Robbins does not stoop to such conspiracy theories, but the possibility is always there.

There has also been some drama. The pioneers in the field had to make their own equipment, and there was at least one major patent dispute lawsuit. There have been some patient problems: With a broken leg is it visible whether it is healed or not, but how do you objectively measure whether the brain is healed? For now, most people equate neurofeedback with pyramid power and fad diets.

This book will give you the history of the field. It is not guide for hopeful practitioners to use to learn how to do it. But I would think anyone wanting to experiment in the space should start with this book to get the background.

We live in a fascinating time. More has been discovered about the brain in the last 10 years than in all of history before that. The hardware necessary to monitor, record, and analyze the brain waves gets dramatically cheaper every year, and it is now possible to get serious equipment for this purpose for mere hundreds of dollars. It makes sense to me that the approach is a serious direction for healing the abnormal mods of brain behavior. These initial steps are no more than poking in the dark with blunt instruments, but I believe we will see a blossoming of the field in the coming years as enthusiasts help build credibility, and the mainstream medical community learns the benefit of this symphony of the brain.
Kajishakar
I love this book, I refer to it often, it is so full of encouraging information about the power of our brains.
If you are looking for a book to educate you on the untapped resource our brains contain, this is a great
place to start. The author refers to ADHD, ADD, Brain Injuries, just a host of things that occur and what
you can do to get our neurons jump started again. It is enlightening, I loved every page.
Mr.Savik
I was recommended this book as an introduction to the world of brain optimization as an adjunct to help address emotional challenges in teens that are unsuccessfully resolved by just talk therapy alone. Emerging science on the brain is now offering us an inside look at how imbalances in the brain can affect a teen’s moods, behavior, interpersonal relationships and academic performance. Depression, anxiety, emotional over-reactivity and impulse control challenges have begun to be addressed directly through brain regulation techniques, like Neurofeedback. I felt it was time for me learn about the history of this treatment option for consideration in my private practice. My takeaway from the book was that neurofeedback has its skeptics, and there are no guarantees it would be effective for any given client, but I would definitely give it consideration as a therapy to try, in combination with talk therapy.
Global Progression
The book is very-well written and easy to read. It is a lovely introduction to neurofeedback. The book presents history of neurofeedback, applications with focus mostly on the clinical side, with many interesting anecdotal stories where neurofeedback helped people who suffered from epilepsy, alcohol addiction and attention deficit disorder. There is some mention of the use of neurofeedback for personal improvement, peak performance and spiritual growth.

There are many factors that influence one's wellbeing and performance and it is not suggested that neurofeedback is a panacea - however, it has helped many people and there is no reason why not incorporate it with other treatments either for healing or for self-improvement. Different people have experienced different results and the only way to find out how it would work for a particular person or for a particular problem is to try it out.

Most neurotherapy practitioners seem to be using neurofeedback anyway in conjunction with other modalities from traditional medicine to alternative therapies - hypnosis, nutrition, counselling, etc, and it seems that in many cases a combination of different modalities brings about the best results.
Painshade
There are so many self-help books which just ploddingly go along giving tips and data. This isn't like that. WHile reading it could start you on the path to really making major positive changes in your life, the book is more of a story about the history of the field and description of its promise and potential than a how-to book. I've been in the field of neurofedback since 1972, but I still learned alot from the big picture, in depth story Jim Robbins spent several years researching and telling. This book tells of the promise, the potential of the new brainwave biofeedback, and it tells a history of its development that could easily be made into a movie, with fascinating characters and multiple plots. I recommend it to people to read so they will learn all the different aspects and potentials of neurofeedback, since it does such a thorough job. But I have to warn them that it is not all pretty. The people who have moved the field forward are human, with flaws. But that makes the STORY even better. Since it came out, articles in the New York Times Book Review and Newsweek, and more have referred positively to the book. It's a good way to find out if you or someone you care about is a potential candidate for neurofeedback, because in all likelihood, your doctor is not going to mention it.
Of course the wild history of neurofeedback continues to go on. Rob Kall [email protected]