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e-Book The American Way: Family and Community in the Shaping Of American Identity epub download

e-Book The American Way: Family and Community in the Shaping Of American Identity epub download

Author: Allan Carlson
ISBN: 1932236236
Pages: 223 pages
Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute; 1 edition (November 1, 2003)
Language: English
Category: Americas
Size ePUB: 1182 kb
Size Fb2: 1958 kb
Size DJVU: 1209 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 634
Format: lit lrf mbr txt
Subcategory: History

e-Book The American Way: Family and Community in the Shaping Of American Identity epub download

by Allan Carlson



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The American Way book. The United States of America is arguably more family-centered than.

The American Way, Allan Carlson's episodic history of the last century, shows how the nation's identity has been shaped by carefully constructed images of the American family and the American home.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -199) and index. Home and nation: the family politics of Theodore Roosevelt - Hyphenates, hausfraus, and baby-saving: the peculiar legacy of German America - "Sanctifying the traditional family": the New Deal and national solidarity - Luce, Life and the "New America" - Cold War and the "American style" - From maternalism to Reaganism, and beyond.

Third Ways: How Bulgarian Greens, Swedish Housewives, and Beer-Swilling Englishmen Created Family-Centered Economies – and Why They Disappeared, (ISI Books, 2007). The Natural Family: A Manifesto, (Spence Pub, 2007). Godly Seed: American Evangelicals Confront Birth Control, 1873-1973, (Transaction Publishers, 2012).

The elements such as identity and adhesion are highlighted from a disciplinary work point of view, as well as the use of theoretical knowledge in the Matemática Educativa field from Latin America. In this context, we refer to a school of thought of a specific community, a Latin American program inserted into the disciplinary world with an identity in which it constructs its own theoretical. knowledge under discussion with theories constructed by traditional scientific cultures.

Similar books and articles. Membership in the American Community as a Component of Identity. Tai J. Mendenhall, Jerica M. Berge, Peter Harper, Betty GreenCrow, Nan LittleWalker, Sheila WhiteEagle & Steve BrownOwl - 2010 - Nursing Inquiry 17 (4):359-372.

The United States of America is arguably more family-centered than any other Western nation. If polling data can be trusted, the vast majority of Americans-a higher percentage than in any other nation-would rather build society around the family and the church than around the individual.

From 1975-78, Carlson served as Assistant Director, Governmental Affairs Office, Lutheran Council in the . In 1977, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Labor.

James Schall of Georgetown University deems it the most countercultural book of the year. From 1975-78, Carlson served as Assistant Director, Governmental Affairs Office, Lutheran Council in the . Movement Archive in Stockholm and, in 1979, an NEH Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (Washington, DC). Later that year, he became Assistant to the President and Lecturer in History at Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania).

The American Way, Allan Carlson’s episodic history of the last century, shows how the nation’s identity has been shaped by carefully constructed images of the American family and the American home.

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The United States of America is arguably more family-centered than any other Western nation. If polling data can be trusted, the vast majority of Americans--a higher percentage than in any other nation--would rather build society around the family and the church than around the individual. In fact, family and religiously grounded community--not individualism, not capitalism, and not a commitment to polyglot cultural pluralism--have historically provided the basis of America's dominant self-understanding. The American Way, Allan Carlson's episodic history of the last century, shows how the nation's identity has been shaped by carefully constructed images of the American family and the American home. From the surprisingly radical measures put forth by Theodore Roosevelt to encourage stable, large families, to the unifying role of the image of the home in assimilating immigrants, to the maternalist activists who attempted to transform the New Deal and other social welfare programs into vehicles for shoring up traditional family life, Carlson convincingly demonstrates the widespread appeal exerted by the images of family and community. Carlson also shows how a family- and faith-centered discourse anchored Henry Luce's publishing enterprise and even American foreign policy during the Cold War. But many of the reforms and ideas championed by pro-family forces in the twentieth century--family activists' embrace of the federal bureaucracy, Luce's propaganda for suburban living and modern architecture--inadvertently worked to undermine family and community life, writes Carlson. And he shows that the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which effectively made it illegal for employers to offer malebreadwinners a living wage, has made it harder for traditional families to make ends meet, further helping to fracture family life. Carlson concludes by arguing that, despite the half-hearted and partially successful attempt of the Reagan administration to again forge a link between the American identity and healthy family life, much bolder measures are necessary if American culture is again to be put on a family- and community-centered footing. Written with grace and precision. The American Way is revisionist history of the highest order.
Stoneshaper
The primary purpose of Carlson's book is to describe the history of the various attempts to formulate American culture through the avenue of federal government policy. Beginning with Theodore Roosevelt administration, which Carlson points to as the starting point of the this government interest in shaping national culture, the story that unfolds is, at one level, a conflict between those who viewed American society as a collection of families, as a collection of self-autonomous individuals with the same individual rights apart from differences in gender or family situation, or as a homogenous indivisible whole with (for the most part) the same values that shape a distinct national culture. It's an interesting story not only to view the shift in political parties (one can see through this prism the difference between cultural conservatives and industrial conservatives, along with the difference between the maternalists and the equity feminists.
More fundamental than the story of the success or failure of each group's attempt to formulate public policy is the tension of underlying premises that Carlson touches upon as this history is told. In a liberal democracy that encourages capitalism, what are the boundaries, if any, to the market process? Does the government have a proper role in encouraging a family policy (such as a "family wage" for the breadwinner male and limited job opportunities for the mother who, according to the policy purposes, has a duty to be at home to raise the children) that runs counter to the laissez-faire principle, or does that violate the promise of guaranteeing equality for all individuals? In another vein, should the government (and other sources with the government's encouragement) encourage a national identity that goes as far as, to paraphrase one criticism quoted in the book, that except for two hours on Sunday, Americans should share the same values and culture, or should that be left for individuals and groups to define for themselves?
Carlson points out that some of the major programs that exist were based on the opposite premises, such as the Social Security program - a maternalist policy - that has been altered by the entrance of mothers into the workforce. Carlson reserves his point of view until the very end of the book (the last two pages), and given the promotion by pro-family groups, one can predict what those principles should be. But even if the reader disagrees with the author's view (which is sort of a neo-maternalist view that recognizes that biological differences between the sexes should be recognized in some instances over abstract equity principles, but that the overt discrimination that denied women equal political and property rights should remain a thing of the past), the book will be informative to describe the history of this aspect of federal government policy.
Erienan
According to Allan Carlson, America is at a crossroads. Historically, its culture has been based on that of Europe. However, there are waves of new immigrants from Latin America who refuse to assimilate and who stubbornly hold on to their non-Eropean culture.
Carlson also holds that America has been down the wrong path ever since the New Deal when there was a massive increase in the size and role of the Federal Government.
According to Carlson, family and community have been the cornerstones of American culture ever since colonial times. This culture included the idea that men were dominant and Protestantism was the dominant religion.
Also acording to Carlson, prior to the New Deal, social welfare was handled by private agencies, many of which were created by German-Americans before 1900. There was also a moral consensus that aided the growth of the American nation. That consensus has since collapsed.
The role of family in American culture has been undermined by government policies such as outlawing workplace discrimination against women.
Carlson's book is a bit gloomy, but it is still an excellent review of the better aspects of traditional American culture.
BoberMod
In "The 'American Way,'" Allan Carlson explores how a certain vision of the child-rich family with a breadwinning husband and a stay-at-home mother became central to the American self-definition in the twentieth century. What contemporary feminist writers sneer at as the "Leave it to Beaver" family emerges in this account as the product of a disciplined vision pursued by union organizers, civil servants, and reformers (mostly women), who saw the ability of the mother to nurture her children and protect them from the temptations of the street or the sweatshop as the fulcrum for realizing the American aims of a good life for all. But mothers could only do this when they were supported by a husband earning a "family wage": enough to support his wife and children. From the turn of the twentieth century to the New Deal, this "maternalist" lobby fought to victory against free market absolutism, the pathologies of impoverished inner-city immigrant communities, and liberal feminism.

Allan Carlson pursues his topic in a series of readable, but disconnected essays: Teddy Roosevelt; the German-American family and assimilation; the New Deal as the apotheosis of maternalism; Henry Luce's influential vision of America; how the strength of the family buttressed American foreign policy; and finally the death of the maternalist vision after 1965 at the hands of the courts and feminists. The subsequent flood of married women into the workplace depressed men's wages, increased the commercialization of the household economy (the roots of today's obesity epidemic), and starved America's previously rich associational life. Throughout, he makes extensive use of the results of recent feminist historians to overturn their unquestioned assumptions and dogmas.

Allan Carlson contrasts America's maternalist vision to Swedish family policy which had from the thirties eagerly socialized household functions and accepted the complete interchangeability of husband and wife. In American family policy, maternalists advocated home economics to nourish thrift and keep commercialization at bay. The single family home, the suburban lawn, the sewing machine, and the vegetable garden expressed the value they placed on the autonomous family and their belief in the stabilizing value of a connection to the land.

"The 'American Way'" is full of surprises for the modern reader: how conservative and pro-family the Democrats once were; how anti-feminist the New Deal really was; how feminists cynically allied with die-hard segregationists to win their first big legislative victory; how much poorer husband-as-breadwinner families have become compared to dual income families since then.

Allan Carlson is a conservative, but not the sort of anti-immigrant or categorically anti-big government conservative that some reviews here take him to be. Indeed I wish he had been even more explicit in the ironies of today's political spectrum. He concludes that the current Republican Party's pro-family policy is a sincere attempt to reverse the disasters of the 1960s and 1970s, but is stymied by the party's inability or unwillingness to challenge either the legal dogma of male-female interchangeability or the dominance of employers in the labor market.