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e-Book Empire: A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon (Wiley Audio) epub download

e-Book Empire: A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon (Wiley Audio) epub download

Author: Dan Cashman,Mitchell Pacelle
ISBN: 1591251478
Publisher: Penton Overseas Inc; Abridged edition (April 1, 2002)
Language: English
Category: Americas
Size ePUB: 1877 kb
Size Fb2: 1155 kb
Size DJVU: 1492 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 134
Format: mbr txt rtf azw
Subcategory: History

e-Book Empire: A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon (Wiley Audio) epub download

by Dan Cashman,Mitchell Pacelle



Empire" - written by Mitchell Pacelle and published in 2001 by John Wiley & Sons. An exhaustive history of the Empire State Building

Start by marking Empire: A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Empire" - written by Mitchell Pacelle and published in 2001 by John Wiley & Sons. An exhaustive history of the Empire State Building. Feb 19, 2007 Kris rated it liked it. not a book i would generally pick up and read, however, it was rather interesting to learn who was involved in all the scandel in the battle for this american icon.

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Radio Programs. by. Pacelle, Mitchell. Librivox Free Audiobook. Spirituality & Religion Podcasts. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

In this fast-paced book, named one of the "Top Ten of 2001" by BusinessWeek, Mitchell Pacelle tells .

In this fast-paced book, named one of the "Top Ten of 2001" by BusinessWeek, Mitchell Pacelle tells the gripping story of the ten-year struggle for control of America's most famous skyscraper-a tale of greed and duplicity that consumed, and nearly destroyed, some of the real estate world's most controversial tycoons. it is a grand human comedy, and Mitchell Pacelle has a fine time with i. -The Washington Post. This book is a complex but riveting tale of how the Empire State Building inspires not just affection for a classic American icon, but incredible greed, hatred, and pretty much all of the seven deadly sins.

In this fast-paced book, named one of the "Top Ten of 2001" by BusinessWeek, Mitchell Pacelle tells the gripping story of the ten-year struggle for control of America?s most famous skyscraper?a tale of greed and duplicity that consumed, and nearly destroyed, some of the real estate.

In this fast-paced book, named one of the "Top Ten of 2001" by BusinessWeek, Mitchell Pacelle tells the gripping story of the ten-year struggle for control of America?s most famous skyscraper?a tale of greed and duplicity that consumed, and nearly destroyed, some of the real estate world?s most controversial tycoons. ? The Washington Post "Who?d have thoughtthat real estate dealings could read like a gossipy novel of intrigue?" ?

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Mobile version (beta). Empire: A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon. Download (pdf, . 7 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Library Journal, September 1, 2001) "Mitchell Pacelle delivers a thrilling history of the mythic building. keeps the pace up in this convoluted tale of pride, prejudice and property.

For some of the world’s most powerful people, it is the ultimate prize AudioBook Bay (ABB).

Written by Mitchell Pacelle, narrated by Dan Cashman. A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal, and the Battle for an American Icon. The Empire State Building is an icon as immediately recognizable as the Eiffel Tower or the Taj Mahal

Written by Mitchell Pacelle, narrated by Dan Cashman. By: Mitchell Pacelle. Narrated by: Dan Cashman. Length: 2 hrs and 47 mins. The Empire State Building is an icon as immediately recognizable as the Eiffel Tower or the Taj Mahal. For some of the world's most powerful people, it is the ultimate prize. In a riveting chronicle of betrayal, revenge, family rivalry, and raw greed, award-winning Wall Street Journal columnist Mitchell Pacelle tells the compelling tale of the Empire State Building ownership battle of the 1980s and '90s.

New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2001. Fine in Fine DJ. B&W Photographs. Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Promise Of Greatness: The War Of 1914-1918.

Chronicles the battle for the Empire State Building between Japanese businessman Hideki Yoko,; his daughter Kiiko Nakahara and her husband Jean-Paul Renoir, real estate kingpins Harry and Leona Helmsley, and Donald Trump.
Quamar
This book is a complex but riveting tale of how the Empire State Building inspires not just affection for a classic American icon, but incredible greed, hatred, and pretty much all of the seven deadly sins. This is also a peek behind the curtain of big time real estate, and a seriously unflattering portrait of most of its practitioners. Absolutely recommended for anyone who wants dirt on Leona Helmsley, or has a vague dislike for Donald Trump. None of these characters, especially the Japanese (both the Yokoi family and the Japanese bankers), comes off as particularly admirable. Very good.
santa
Wheel and deal. This is the environment blonde (resident Rump comes from.
SARAND
very interesting account of how ego, greed and poor research affect real estate investments.

good historical account of how property values were overinflated and seasoned investors were only too happy to offload them to unsuspecting foreigners. [even though the media claimed america was loosing its landmarks.]
Orll
Riviting. Great review of Trump's approach to deal making.
Zyangup
If you really want some insight into Trump's character, honesty, tendency to braggadocio, etc. read Pacelle, "Empire--A Tale of Obsession, Betrayal and the Battle for an American Icon" (2001). You will learn that, while Trump is an owner of the Empire State Building, that ownership interest nets him a relatively small annual return (as it is subject to a ground lease to the owner of the land in which the building sits, and to an operating lease providing a relatively small rental that extends to @ 2074). At p. 295 the author notes: "Trump's Empire State Building venture appeared to be shaping up as little more than an exercise in ego, gratification, a misadventure with little promise as a profit-making enterprise" that Trump portrays as "a brilliant deal." One of his associates in that deal gave one of the bldg's operating lessees a fake antique hollow sculpture of Donald Duck supposedly inspired by Donald Trump: a "hollow", "fake". "cartoon character." (at p. 248).
Twentyfirstfinger
When Japan was enjoying the height of its economy members of their super rich went on buying sprees that will remain legendary for both their scope and their questionable judgment. For a time landmarks and trophy properties were being purchased by Japanese investors from the beaches of Hawaii to downtown Manhattan. There was a certain unease expressed by some in this country that too much was being sold to a handful of foreign investors. For those who followed most of these acquisitions the only aspect that was more spectacular than the absurd prices that were paid, was the speed with which the buildings were either abandoned in bankruptcy procedures, or sold back to American owners for a fraction of what had been paid a few short years earlier.
Rockefeller Center was a 1.4 billion dollar loss to creditors; Pebble Beach Golf Course was taken back by banks and resold for approximately 50 cents on the dollar. Beachfront hotels in Hawaii fell into disrepair as the economy in Japan crumbled when their stock market fell some 44 percent almost overnight, and has still come nowhere near to recovering. The other willingness to spend without any regard for value was on art, primarily that of the great impressionists. The market both simultaneously hit its high and began dying in the three days one Tokyo businessman paid almost 80 million for a Van Gough, and then set the all time record for a painting a day later when buying a Renoir for 82.5 million. Both paintings were repossessed by the auction houses that sold them for non-payment, so whether they truly set records is open to debate. Even the third highest amount paid for a painting, some 50+ million, again a Van Gough, which was bought by an Australian, was again repossessed for failure to pay, and eventually sold to The Getty Museum in California for a number rumored to be half what it brought at auction.
Until I read, "Empire", by Mitchell Pacelle I thought that the "enthusiasm" that drove these purchases had ended, not unlike the dot.com hysteria our markets created and then destroyed. However Mr. Yokoi was to carry through the 1990's the same financially unjustifiable buying that his countrymen had been destroyed by earlier. In the process he and two other family members spent time in jail, and ultimately his unusual family was left in the same devastated state as the financial assets he once held.
Placing a value on the baseball that was the 70th homerun ball is purely subjective. The same case can be made for art; a given piece is worth what a given individual will pay on a given day. Real estate, especially commercial real estate has very defined methodologies for determining value, for determining the return a buyer or buyers are willing to accept. Oversimplified, an entity that is buying a piece of real estate is buying the income that it is producing, and what it is reasonably expected to produce in a definable future. When an investor makes a purchase the return expected and the risk taken are key elements in any rational decision.
The focus of the book includes residential homes that were bought as well as The Empire State Building. Residential real estate is again defined primarily by what a willing and capable buyer will spend, and in the case of the buying this man did based only on pictures of homes that resided in countries he had never visited, suffice to say the deals were all questionable and many were marked by no thought at all.
The New York Landmark clearly was a textbook example of emotional behavior. The building itself and the land it sits on is own by one group of people. The right to "occupy" the entire building is owned by two people until the year 2076. The rent they pay the owners of the building would give Mr. Yokoi about a 2.5 percent return on his money, or about the same as a checking account. Had he bought Treasury Bills of The US, he could have made double that return with zero risk. The real mind bender comes when one reads that those who hold the lease until 2076, NEVER have an increase in the rent they must pay; it actually goes down for a significant portion of the lease! Take into account inflation or net present value of the value of money in decades to come, and the only real income is the psychic value an owner feels from owning the property. One of the two holders of that lease is none other than Leona Helmsley, a woman not known for her diplomacy and for playing well with others. The quotes attributed to her in this book would make a longshoreman blush.
None of the family members/friends that made these deals were competent to do so. I have or hold several real estate licenses, and not one of these people could have passed the state exam for New York, however they were negotiating on their own for The Empire State Building! As I mentioned, the destruction of this family is a major part of the tale. The travails include the Patriarch Mr. Yokoi spending almost 3 years in a Japanese Jail, his daughter spending a similar time either in a French Prison or confined to France, and her husband spent over 3 years in a US Prison. All of these incarcerations occurred while the battle for control of this building was taking place.
If my comments sound like a stretch, they are mild in comparison to what all of the details of this folly entailed. As you read this book, at some point you will be reminded of P.T. Barnum and his famous take on people, "there is one born every minute".