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e-Book Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930 epub download

e-Book Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930 epub download

Author: Jan Mackell
ISBN: 0826333435
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (October 16, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Americas
Size ePUB: 1279 kb
Size Fb2: 1196 kb
Size DJVU: 1120 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 859
Format: mbr azw doc lrf
Subcategory: History

e-Book Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930 epub download

by Jan Mackell



Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview of the business between 1860 and 1930. This look at prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930, uncovers the lives and woes of "working girls" in mining towns such as Cripple Creek.

Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview of the business between 1860 and 1930. Paperback: 320 pages. Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (October 16, 2007).

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Brothels, Bordellos, & Bad Girls book. Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Brothels, Bordellos, & Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado. Delicacy, humor, respect, and compassion are among the merits of this book. Although other authors have flirted with Colorado's commercial sex, Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview.

Delicacy, humor, respect, and compassion are among the merits of this book

She used census data, Sanborn maps, city directories, property records, marriage records, and court records to document and trace the movements of the women over the course of their careers, uncovering work histories, medical problems, and numerous relocations from town to town.

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado.

MacKell's forthcoming University of New Mexico Press book, Red Light.

In Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls, preservationist and historian Jan MacKell, director of the Cripple Creek District Museum, explores a range of primary and secondary sources that illuminate the history of female prostitutes in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Colorado.

MacKell states that she was born on November 27, 1860, but the picture of her headstone states she was born in. .Brothels, Bordellos & Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado 1860-1930. University of New Mexico Press

MacKell states that she was born on November 27, 1860, but the picture of her headstone states she was born in 1861. 45, 57 and Enss stated she was born in 1861. MacKell, Jan (2004). University of New Mexico Press. pp. 129–127, 132–134, 239–243.

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado "Delicacy, humor, respect, and compassion are among the merits of this book. Although other authors have flirted with Colorado"s commercial sex, Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview.

Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930. Brothels, Bordellos, & Bad Girls is a fascinating book because it puts a human face on prostitution. She used census data, Sanborn maps, city directories, property records, marriage records, and court records to document and trace the movements of the women over the course of their careers, uncovering work histories, medical problems, and numerous relocations from town to town.

c 2018 by Jan MacKell Collins. The Passing of Faro Dan. Cactus Nell in the gaudy gown.

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado. Mining was the principal occupation and men outnumbered women more than twenty to one. Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview of the business between 1860 and 1930, focusing her research on the mining towns of Cripple Creek, Salida, Colorado City, and similar boomtown communities. She used census data, Sanborn maps, city directories, property records, marriage records, and court records to document and trace the movements of the women over the course of their careers, uncovering work histories, medical problems, and numerous relocations from town to town. She traces many to their graves, through years filled with abuse, disease, narcotics, and violence.

MacKell has unearthed numerous colorful and often touching stories, like that of the boy raised in a brothel who was invited to play with a neighbor's children and replied, "No, my mother is a whore and says I am to stay at home."

"Delicacy, humor, respect, and compassion are among the merits of this book. Although other authors have flirted with Colorado's commercial sex, Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview. She has been researching these elusive women for the last fifteen years. Such persistence allows her to offer rich detail on shady ladies who rarely used their real names or even stuck with the same professional name for long."--Thomas J. Noel, from the Introduction

Hap
I recently went to Colorado for the first time. Some friends moved back to Colorado Springs a couple years ago and I had the opportunity to spend a week with them. Since I'd never seen the state before, but had limited time, we focused my visit on geography and history, especially the various towns in the gold mine region. When I got back to New Hampshire, I got a copy of Money Mountain (Marshall Sprague, 1953). It's an excellent history of the Colorado gold mines, full of information and superbly written. As I wrapped it up, I remembered seeing this book, Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls in Cripple Creek. I reflected on the fact that history is often the guys' story, and in this particular case, the gals had a powerful story to tell as well. This book is much denser with facts and at times, a hard slog. But it's worth it. There's a lot to be told here and not many opportunities to tell it. And what a research job. There is, of course, a cast of women who stayed in the newspapers and who were leaders in the community, not only as madams but also as generous benefactors of the poor and the hungry. But most of them left their families, changed their names, assumed nick names, and switched identities as often as they moved from town to town and back, appearing and disappearing like phantoms. Tracking these women is a true feat: newspapers, directories, deeds, records from bordellos throughout the state and elsewhere (California, Kansas), songs and poems, memoirs, cemetery records... In the end, I've learned a lot about the old West, about its history from the Civil War to the beginning of the Great Depression. And I've learned a lot about the daily lives of the "soiled doves" who played as vital a role in the founding of the towns of Colorado as did the prospectors and speculators. Gunsmoke's Miss Kitty will never be the same.
Landamath
"Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls: Prostitution in Colorado 1860-1930" by Jan MacKell is easy to read and historically interesting research into the lives of women who had to or wanted to earn their living by prostitution. I am researching the topic for a historically accurate story to appear in my second book about "Colorado Mountain Women: Tales From the Mining Camps." I found useful information about the health care and living conditions of these women, mostly in Cripple Creek CO but also in other Colorado towns. The Oldest Profession won't go away, and this book is a good factual introduction into the historical reality of women in the profession. The most to be pitied were the widows whose husbands had been killed in mining accidents or other hazardous jobs, leaving them penniless, and perhaps with young children. Sometimes they had no choice about how to survive. Most of the women discussed in this book couldn't wait to get out of the profession, marry well, and lead decent lives.
Djang
Good book about the history of prostitution in Colorado. Very interesting, I thought. Certain prostitutes are named, as well as their experiences in life. Guess I was surprised to find out that so many have committed suicide. Others seemed to thrive, but they were tough women. Some of the dishonest techniques that were used to get the money patrons had were described, such as using a wire to sneak their clothing from the closets while they were enjoying the prostitute; steal their wallets and/or money and return the clothing to the closet! Good reading for anyone interested in the history of the old west, specifically in the State of Colorado.
Siatanni
All I am going to say is: A must read book for the Old West fanatic. Awesome book with lots of good info.
Adrierdin
I thought this book was very good, detailed, hits all the well known towns, lots of good information, a boon to the historical researcher, writer, or arm chair historian.
SoSok
5 star
Reggy
This could have been a very good book, but it's chaotic and disorganized. The meat of the subject--the realities of prostitution in old Colorado--is often lost in tedious lists of names, addresses, and costs of fines and "tricks." (These amounts are given without providing the equivalent in today's currency, thus robbing them of necessary context. I can understand the discrepancy between a girl who made $1/service in 1890 and a girl who made $10/service in 1890, but I can't compare either of those to, say, my own salary now.)

MacKell admits in the intro that it's difficult to verify whether women were prostitutes or simply lived in sketchy areas and/or performed in dance halls, and she's done her best not to speculate. She also acknowledges that descendents might be upset to learn their foremothers worked as prostitutes. Given these alleged concerns, however, she's eager to catalog the name of any woman who might possibly have been a prostitute, sometimes on evidence no more convincing than "she was a single woman who lived on the same street as several brothels and died young." She regularly draws conclusions unwarranted by the evidence she provides and gives facts that have little to do with the claims they're meant to support. One of many examples of this is on page 36, where she says, "Domestic violence was shockingly commonplace," then lists several incidents of violence between prostitutes and customers--but none between intimate partners or members of the same households.

She makes numerous unwarranted assumptions; for example, on p. 142 she mentions a madam who relocated to L.A., "where she no doubt continued her profession." These kinds of comments--she no doubt did X, surely she thought Y, every prostitute wanted Z
--occur frequently throughout the book and, especially given MacKell's stated goal of de-mystifying prostitutes' lives and avoiding speculation, are inappropriate and careless.

There are nonsensical sentences such as this gem from page 126: "Sometime after that, if he was still present at all, Sam Dale seems to have disappeared."

The overall organization, both within and between chapters, is poor. As a result, material is often repetitive or disconnected. Chapters 4 and 7 both deal with Colorado City, but there's no apparent reason for separating them into distinct chapters at all, let alone for interspersing two other chapters between them.

I'm very disappointed in the University of New Mexico Press. There are plenty of raw materials and solid research here, but a good editor was needed to shape a messy manuscript into an intelligible, thoughtful, well-articulated resource that would be valuable both to academicians and to casual students of history. I feel that the choice--by both MacKell and the publisher--to release this in its current form did a disservice to her years of research and hard work. I'll finish slogging through the book because I'm interested in the subject, but I'll be muttering angrily at MacKell and her (nonexistent?) editor the whole time.