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e-Book SEA ASSAULT: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership epub download

e-Book SEA ASSAULT: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership epub download

Author: Captain Joseph F. Enright,James W. Ryan
ISBN: 0312977468
Pages: 299 pages
Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks; 1st edition (October 2000)
Language: English
Category: Military
Size ePUB: 1281 kb
Size Fb2: 1387 kb
Size DJVU: 1673 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 915
Format: rtf doc docx mbr
Subcategory: History

e-Book SEA ASSAULT: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership epub download

by Captain Joseph F. Enright,James W. Ryan



Sea Assault is war writing at its finest. In this World War II tale we follow the American sub Archer-Fischer and her tentative skipper, Captain Joseph F. Enright, on her hunt and discovery of Japan's new secret weapon, a 72,000-ton aircraft carrier.

Sea Assault is war writing at its finest. What ensues is likened to a high stakes chess game scattered across the throes of the south Pacific. The book alternates point of view every other chapter. One chapter is written in the first person by its author, Captain Enright

Joseph F. Enright (Author), James W. Ryan (Author). SEA ASSAULT: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership. Captain Joseph F. Enright.

Joseph F. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. But Japan built the Shinano in complete secrecy and kept news of its sinking secret from its own people as well. The result was that this important WWII naval action remains nearly unknown even today. The book covers the Shinano/Archer-fish encounter from both the American and Japanese sides - and so gives a very complete picture of the events (and some of the thinking behind them).

Captain Joseph F. Good page turner, and I learned something about one of Japan’s last and largest carriers. I found this book to be interesting, informative and well written.

Enright was captain of USS Archer-Fish when it torpedoed Shinano in November 1944.

Ships from and sold by wickfisher books. Enright was captain of USS Archer-Fish when it torpedoed Shinano in November 1944. The work would have benefited from an opening chapter placing the operation in the context of the Pacific War.

Complete summary of Joseph F. Enright, James W. Ryan's Shinano! The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership . eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of Shinano! The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership.

All secret documents sank with the ship in a locked safe . Enright was the captain of the US submarine that sank her on her maiden voyage.

All secret documents sank with the ship in a locked safe in 4,000 meters of water. Japanese Naval Headquarters was informed by radio message about the fate of Shinano, which sank just 17 hours into her maiden voyage. With a tonnage of 72,000, Shinano became the biggest warship in history to be sunk by a submarine. Enright co-wrote the book so first hand experiences, feelings and emotions abound. He even solicited input from some survivors of the Shinano. This is his tale of that fateful encounter.

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During the years before the outbreak of World War II, the Japanese navy constructed two super-battleships, the Yamato and Musashi

During the years before the outbreak of World War II, the Japanese navy constructed two super-battleships, the Yamato and Musashi. There was a secret third ship, the Shinano, that was to be included in this class. However, with the rise of the aircraft carrier, it was decided to convert the Shinano from a battleship to a carrier. Measuring almost 900 feet in length, Shinano was the largest aircraft carrier in the world

Books have immortalized Japan's super-battleships Yamato and Musashi, but the . Items related to Shinano: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership.

Books have immortalized Japan's super-battleships Yamato and Musashi, but the top-secret conversion to an aircraft carrier of a bigger sister ship, Shinano, has remained part naval legend, part military secret. Even after this huge mystery carrier was sunk on her first night at sea by Captain Enright's submarine Archer-Fish, . intelligence questioned Shinano's existence. Home Enright, Joseph . Ryan, James W. Shinano: The Sinking of Japan's Secret Supership.

Enright also provides superb background on the Shinano, and this book tells this small obscure tale in a fashion that is engaging and holds a reader’s attention. Enright’s writing also opens a deeper picture of intelligence. American intelligence had considered the Shinano to possibly be a cruiser (deriving the name from the Shinano River, rather than the ancient prefecture the ship was actually named for). This minor controversy from six decades ago shows just how inexact a science intelligence is – it is arguably a craft or an art as much as it is science.

During the Pacific leg of World War II, the U.S. Navy struck an astounding blow to the Japanese-a defeat which would become one of the greatest David and Goliath stories in the history of warfare. Japan's Shinano was a mammoth 72,000-ton aircraft carrier, equipped with a huge arsenal of guns, and carrying some 4,000 men. Yet, a small U.S. submarine, the Archer-Fish, less than a thirtieth the size of Shinano and carrying just 82 men, managed to sink the gargantuan vessel into the embattled Pacific with just four strategically placed torpedoes. Here, vividly told by the Commander of the Archer-Fish, is the incredible true story of this crushing victory-and a fascinating account of heroism, history, and warfare.
Modigas
Excellent Book. Amazing marksmanship of a submarine skipper. Perfectly placed, spaced and depth setting of torpedos.

Understand why the B-29 intelligence did not differenti
ate this ship in the ways of Yokosuka naval base. It would look like any other hull from the air at 50,000 +/- altitude.

Book not too great as far as writing concerned but quite good because of the history.

I was there at the time of the armistice, tied up at Yokosuka naval yard. Wonder what the big battleship burned out hull there in the harbor. We all wondered. I have found nothing about it in my reading of the WWII history.

Enjoy.

Leon Emerson QM 1/c
WW II.
Wafi
Sea Assault is war writing at its finest. In this World War II tale we follow the American sub Archer-Fischer and her tentative skipper, Captain Joseph F. Enright, on her hunt and discovery of Japan's new secret weapon, a 72,000-ton aircraft carrier. What ensues is likened to a high stakes chess game scattered across the throes of the south Pacific.
The book alternates point of view every other chapter. One chapter is written in the first person by its author, Captain Enright. The other point of view is told using Japanese sources and follows the carrier's skipper, Japanese Captain Abe.
As the Archer-Fish tracks, then closes in and subsequently engages the huge carrier, the Shinano, you vicariously experience this all from the vantage point of your chair.
For example:
"All of us could now hear the sharp sounds of the destroyer's propellers as she headed our way. When dropped to a keel depth of 62-feet, we would have about 10 feet between Archer-Fish's upper periscope support and the destroyer's keel. The Japanese war ship churned closer. The noise of its propellers increased in volume as she whipped through the water ... The destroyer rolling the water right above us. The beat of the big propellers so close was breathtaking. She thundered overhead like a locomotive. The whole submarine vibrated and rolled from the shock waves..."
Not only was the sinking of the carrier, the Shining, an epic event, but its telling her makes it an epic read. Highly recommended.
Kamick
Originally published under the title "Shinano"
For my money, this is the very best book about US submarines in World War II.
Well researched, it tells the story of the sinking of the Japanese super-carrier Shinano from the viewpoints of both the attacking submarine (USS Archer-fish) and its huge prey, which is desperately trying to avoid any conflict at all during its maiden/shake down voyage.
You are put on the bridges of both vessels - and inside the minds of both commanders - in alternating chapters as the time line of the engagement unfolds. This unique perspective allows the reader to clearly see each move and counter move in a deadly chess match carried out in the ocean south of Tokyo Bay.
Although not delving too deeply into the technical aspects of each vessel's capabilities and tactics, Enright and Ryan are able to give the reader understandable insight into how these capabilities and associated weaknesses constrain and affect the outcome of this contest at each stage of its progress.
But it is the intellectual and emotional aspects of the two combatants that ultimately determines the success and failure on each side. Critical decisions by both parties, which seem logical based upon the assumptions made from their individual perspectives, are seen in the narrative to sometimes be, perceptually and in reality, costly errors of judgement. Some are fatal, some are correctable.
Captain Enright, being the submarine commander, opens his soul to the reader, showing how his previous experiences and failures provided him with the determination to persevere and overcome his doubts and tactical errors while stalking his opponent. It is this perseverence that allows the Archer-fish to doggedly stay on the very ragged edge of pursuit, until finally the Shinao makes a combination of moves that just barely allows Enright to get into the perfect position to make an attack.
On the Japanese side, the authors were able to utilize their extensive research to also "get into the head" of the Shinano's commander (Captain Toshio Abe). Here the pressures of being responsible for the care of Japan's crowning naval achievement, the largest aircraft carrier built during the war, combined with the stress of over three years of continuous tough naval conflict , took their toll. Captain Abe's judgement was understandably clouded by these pressures, and the book clearly describes how key assumptions made by him led to the tactical mistakes that provided the slender opening through which the Archer-fish was able to slip into an attack position. Most critical of these was his steadfast belief that he was beset by an entire "wolfpack" of U.S. submarines. In Abe's haste to escape the dangers he perceived coming from many fronts, he stumbled right into the path of the single Archer-fish.
Neat stuff ! The details make for fascinating reading.
In addition, the book also does an excellent job of addressing the interesting background information concerning the decision to convert the Shinano from a "Yamato" class battle ship to a carrier, and the many hurdles and extreme secrecy associated with her construction.
Also well done is the heart rendering personal accounts of the survivors of the sinking of the Shinano. These sailors exhibit the extreme bravery and concern for humanity in times of disaster that one comes to expect of sailors from any nation.
This book is truly an equisite jewel hidden under an avalanch of submarine related WWII novels and personal accounts. This one is special.
Adorardana
This is an easy-to-read account of the sinking of the supership Shinano, just out of the Tokyo Bay shipyards, in the final days of WWII, by a U.S. submarine. The action goes back-and-forth between the U.S. captain who authored the book, and the Japanese officers, whose accounts he later researched. Learn about the cat-and-mouse game of the submariners' war in this book. Not overly technical, I read it in three days of light reading. Worth your time and your money!