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e-Book A Biblical Case for an Old Earth epub download

e-Book A Biblical Case for an Old Earth epub download

Author: David Snoke
ISBN: 0801066190
Pages: 224 pages
Publisher: Baker Books (August 1, 2006)
Language: English
Category: World
Size ePUB: 1738 kb
Size Fb2: 1790 kb
Size DJVU: 1360 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 345
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Subcategory: History

e-Book A Biblical Case for an Old Earth epub download

by David Snoke



Start by marking A Biblical Case for an Old Earth as Want to Read . Both a scientist and a preacher, David Snoke presents a theological study of several themes in the evolution discussion, including the balance theme of Scripture and the day-age interpretation.

Start by marking A Biblical Case for an Old Earth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Complete with an appendix that gives a literal translation of Genesis 1-11, this intriguing study will interest both scientists and lay Christians who want to dig into the faith-science intersection.

In this book I argue that the old-earth position is a valid, conservative, and orthodox interpretation of the Bible. This book presents the case for a day-age view that takes Genesis 1 as giving a real chronological sequence, but not necessarily of twenty-four-hour days

In this book I argue that the old-earth position is a valid, conservative, and orthodox interpretation of the Bible. This book presents the case for a day-age view that takes Genesis 1 as giving a real chronological sequence, but not necessarily of twenty-four-hour days. This position is too quickly dismissed by both sides, although many Christians who are trained scientists, such as Hugh Ross and Robert Newman, find this view very appealing.

Both a scientist and a preacher, David Snoke presents a theological study of several themes in the evolution discussion, including the balance theme of Scripture . Books related to A Biblical Case for an Old Earth.

Both a scientist and a preacher, David Snoke presents a theological study of several themes in the evolution discussion, including the balance theme of Scripture and the day-age interpretation.

224 pages, softcover from Baker The thoughts in this book are guaranteed to send shock waves through the Christian community.

224 pages, softcover from Baker. A Biblical Case for an Old Earth (9780801066191) by David Snoke. The thoughts in this book are guaranteed to send shock waves through the Christian community.

A marvelous book! Dr. Snoke gives us a powerful biblical warrant for an old earth, the best I've ever seen. I especially appreciate his confidence that the Bible is true and that science can be a tool to help us interpret it properly

A marvelous book! Dr. I especially appreciate his confidence that the Bible is true and that science can be a tool to help us interpret it properly. Thank you, Dr. Snoke!"-C. John Collins, professor, Covenant Theological Seminary.

He offers a compelling biblical case that the young-earth position is theologically flawed. No matter what one's initial position, A Biblical Case for an Old Earth will certainly provoke Christians to think more deeply about this often divisive topic. Drawing out the deeper themes of Scripture often lost in modern discussion, Snoke shows how the biblical texts as well as modern scientific discoveries are better explained by a day-age model. -Michael J. Behe, author, Darwin's Black Box. "A marvelous book!

His latest book is A Biblical Case for an Old Earth. Snoke's little book is remarkable for how little it says about the history of life or the age of the earth

His latest book is A Biblical Case for an Old Earth. Snoke's little book is remarkable for how little it says about the history of life or the age of the earth. You'd think that a book about an old earth would say how old it is. But if the author has an opinion on the subject, he doesn't say so in his book. The closest he comes is this: In this chapter I have argued that the world looks as though animals and plants have been living and dying for millions of years. From which, I guess, he (sort of) thinks that life on earth is at least several million years old.

David Snoke’s book A Biblical Case for an Old Earth ostensibly falls in the latter group, though his main reason for rejecting biblical creation is really uniformitarian ‘science’. Books like these generally don’t pose a threat to informed creationists, and this one is no exception.

Published 2006 (Paperback): 224 pages. He offers a compelling biblical case that the young-earth position is theologically flawed. Respected physicist and professor Dr. David Snoke argues that the Bible does tell us about the scientific history of our world, but it does not teach that the world was created recently. He argues that the earth is millions of years old-and created miraculously by God.

The present creation-evolution debate is often cast as a choice between two positions: naturalistic evolution over millions of years or miraculous creation six thousand years ago. When simplified, this choice is often presented as one between science and the Bible, a choice that leaves much ground between the two views yet to be discussed.A Biblical Case for an Old Earth seeks to address the gap between theistic evolutionism and young-earth creationism by finally paying due attention to the biblical aspect of the debate. Both a scientist and a preacher, David Snoke presents a theological study of several themes in the evolution discussion, including the balance theme of Scripture and the day-age interpretation. Complete with an appendix that gives a literal translation of Genesis 1-11, this intriguing study will interest both scientists and lay Christians who want to dig into the faith-science intersection.
ZloyGenii
David Snoke is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh and is an elder in the Presbyterian Church in America, in which denomination he also is licensed to preach. As is true in many evangelical denominations in America, the PCA has gone through a struggle between young earth and old earth creationists, with many young earth creationists declaring that those holding to an old earth should not be allowed to preach or hold office. The PCA has decided against this exclusive policy, but the controversy continues. Snoke has written this book as a defense of the old earth position.

Snoke spends some time with the scientific arguments for an old earth, which he summarizes quite well. These include arguments from starlight, from magnetic domains on the ocean floor, and from other well known phenomena on Earth showing the passage of time. He also spends some time showing how flood geology will not account for the geological layers we observe.

However, most of the book, as the title indicates, deals with biblical and theological arguments. Snoke demonstrates how it is necessary to use our experience in the world, including our observations, when interpreting the Bible--the Bible was not written in a vacuum. The fullest and most helpful discussions in the book, in my opinion, describe the very good creation of Genesis as containing both positive, helpful, parts, and dark, dangerous parts. He does a good job explaining the place of the "sea" and "sea monsters" in Hebrew biblical thought. Snokes is very convincing showing that the "very good" creation included danger and death in the plant and animal kingdom, and danger for the human kingdom. This "dark side" also glorifies God in many OT texts.

Somewhat detracting is the lengthy appendix consisting of his own translation of Genesis 1-11. Snoke's translation is indiosyncratic, and his linguistic procedures are poor when handling idioms or handling the same Hebrew term in contexts where it has different meanings. He admits not being a Hebrew expert. A better procedure would have been to take a standard translation and suggest changes or make clarifications in parentheses. Yet, in spite of this anti-climactic appendix, the book is very valuable showing how the Hebrew and the OT world would have understood the text much differently than modern young earth creationists do.
Bele
Though I'm not necessarily in agreement with the author (this is basically my introduction to the opposing sides of new/old earth creationism ;P :) . . . he definitely approaches the subject well and gives a convincing argument.

Only the first few chapters actually covered scientific data, however, since this was mostly approaching the theological side of the issue . . . so I'm looking forward to getting into the actual 'science' behind the theories that are being debated :D

I'd recommend it even to those who strongly disagree with his perspective...
Elastic Skunk
Very easy to read and comprehend.
Joony
One controversial topic among Christian believers is that of creation theology, especially concerning the age of God's creation. Is the earth only about 6,000 years old as most "young-earthers" insist the Bible states (seven literal 24 hour days occuring 6,000 years ago according to the geneologies in Genesis)? Or, is the earth much older, perhaps billions of years old, with the universe even older?

Dr. David W. Snoke PhD, the author of this somewhat scholarly book, is a Physics professor at the University of Pittsburgh. He presents many scientific (data) proofs to show conclusively that the earth is ancient, and insists that the Bible supports the notion of an ancient earth. Snoke writes that "young-earthers" impose their particular young-earth creation theology upon the Genesis account (insisting on a literal 7-day, 24 hour creation period)- an effort that Snoke claims does not fit the text.

If you have interest in this subject, this book will hold your interest from start to finish. Caution - it is not a book to casually read in one's spare time! Rather, this is a book to study, to work through slowly, much like a textbook. The scientific proofs of an ancient earth are explained in detail, and it takes time to "digest" these proofs, to learn them and understand them. After Dr. Snoke presents the scientific case for an ancient earth, he then gives a three chapter treatise on the Biblical case for an ancient earth (citing Biblical texts that support the notion that the earth is indeed ancient). He wraps up the book with the obvious (and not so obvious) implications of his evidence. (I won't list the implications here, as these would be considered "spoilers").

I consider this book an important text in the on-going debate between young and old earther Christian believers. As a student of the sciences myself, I never accepted the notion of a "young" earth, a literal 24-hour, 7-day creation week. I don't beleive Genesis should be interpreted that way, as it does not make sense scientifically, and since the Creator created both the earth and science, the two must be in harmony. As an aside, I am most grateful for the writings of Dr. Hugh Ross, Christian believer, Physicist and Astronomer. Dr. Ross's many books present the case for a "Day-Age" interpretation of Genesis, which has allowed me to understand Genesis 1 and 2 for the first time (without compromising my scientific background). (Some Hugh Ross books I highly recommend are Genesis One: A Scientific Perspective,Why the Universe Is the Way It Is, and The Genesis Question: Scientific Advances and the Accuracy of Genesis.

Science and the Bible are not contradicatory (but sometimes our flawed interpretations of the scriptures are contradicatory). The God that created our world also created all the scientific principles of physics, biology, chemistry, and geology, that definitively prove we live in an ancient earth, and a much more ancient universe.

Dr. Snokes' book is clear and concise, explained so that the layperson and scientist can clearly understand his reasoning on the age of the earth and why the Bible supports an ancient earth. It is well worth the time to read, especially if you have been taught in religious training (like me) that the earth is only 6,000 years old. Many youg-earth groups dogmatically teach a young earth, and even go so far as to suggest blasphemy to those that do not accept their teaching. I liken them to the Catholic Church that insisted Galileo was wrong about the eath-sun-planetary model.

konedog