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e-Book Last Jews in Berlin epub download

e-Book Last Jews in Berlin epub download

Author: Leonard Gross
ISBN: 0450057763
Pages: 352 pages
Publisher: New English Library Ltd; New edition edition (April 1, 1985)
Language: English
Category: World
Size ePUB: 1318 kb
Size Fb2: 1817 kb
Size DJVU: 1362 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 222
Format: lit rtf docx mobi
Subcategory: History

e-Book Last Jews in Berlin epub download

by Leonard Gross



This book details the lives of a dozen Jews who survived Hitler and his henchmen right in the very heart of the Third Reich.

This book details the lives of a dozen Jews who survived Hitler and his henchmen right in the very heart of the Third Reich. How they managed is chronicled in a way that reads like a thriller with heart-stopping moments, but also some very uplifting moments. Gross chronicles the lives of several Jews who were able to survive in Berlin till the end of the war. Their stories also include the tales of their family, friends, and neighbors who did not live till the liberation.

last years of World War II. Leonard Gross. Bear Valley, California

last years of World War II. Bear Valley, California. By 1941 almost half the Jews remaining in Germany were congregated in Berlin, to some extent as a consequence of local actions that had ousted them from smaller communities, but principally because of their desire to seek strength in numbers and anonymity in the largest of Germany’s cities. The metropolitan area of Berlin contained nearly four million people.

In this captivating and harrowing book, Leonard Gross details the real-life stories of a dozen Jewish men and . Compiled from extensive interviews, The Last Jews in Berlin reveals these individuals’ astounding determination, against all odds, to live each day knowing it could be their last.

A teenage orphan, a black-market jewel trader, a stylish young designer, and a progressive intellectual were among the few who managed to survive.

The interviews author Leonard Gross used to write this book were taken in the 60s and 70s. If Gross had not . Leonard Gross interviewed and studied the testimonies of Jews who survived living in Berlin during the entire war. An important rule was the life stories had to be validated. If Gross had not immortalized their stories, they would be lost to history. We're at the point were very few survivors are left to tell their tale. My Thoughts: The Last Jews in Berlin answered two questions I'd had for many years: Were there Jews who survived living in Berlin during WWII?

Upstairs were two bedrooms, one large, one small, with a connecting door. Above the bedrooms was an attic.

Upstairs were two bedrooms, one large, one small, with a connecting door. tenants, Joseph and Kadi Wirkus, to be used in the event that they did not have time to get to the community shelter a few blocks away. Kurt and Hella Riede, the young Jewish couple Jerneitzig had brought to Wittenau on the morning after the massive February 27 roundup of Jews in Berlin, moved into the smaller of the two upstairs bedrooms

In this captivating and harrowing book, Leonard Gross details the real-life stories of a dozen Jewish men and .

Jews, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), World War, 1939-1945. New York : Simon and Schuster. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on December 24, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

In February 1943, four thousand Jews went underground in Berlin. By the end of the war, all but a few hundred of them had died in bombing raids or, more commonly, in death camps

In February 1943, four thousand Jews went underground in Berlin. By the end of the war, all but a few hundred of them had died in bombing raids or, more commonly, in death camps. This is the real-life story of some of the few of them - a young mother, a scholar and his countess lover, a black-market jeweler, a fashion designer, a Zionist, an opera-loving merchant, a teen-age orphan - who resourcefully, boldly, defiantly, luckily survived. In hiding or in masquerade, by their wits and sometimes with the aid of conscience-stricken German gentiles, they survived.

In February 1943 four thousand Jews went underground in Berlin. By the end of the war all but a few hundred of them had died in bombing raids or, more commonly, in death camps

In February 1943 four thousand Jews went underground in Berlin. By the end of the war all but a few hundred of them had died in bombing raids or, more commonly, in death camps. This is the poignant story of some of those women and men-a young mother, a scholar and his countess lover, a black-market jeweler, a fashion designer, a Zionist, an opera-loving merchant, a teen-age orphan-who resourcefully, boldly, defiantly, luckily, survived.

Hucama
You read a book like this that details the lengths Berlin Jews had to go to during WWII in order to avoid capture, deportation, and death in the camps, and you simply wonder how on earth they did it. It took connections with gentiles who were willing to put their own lives on the line in order to help. It took constant vigilance, willingness to move at a moment's notice when a safe haven suddenly wasn't safe anymore, and the ability to think on their feet in dangerous situations. Beyond all that, they needed uncommonly dogged determination just to face each day without losing lose heart, through week after month after year of uncertainty. How they managed to do that knowing that death could come knocking at the door at any moment, I don't know. It filled me with admiration for the Jewish "U-boats" and those who helped them.
Bludsong
The subject, of course, is interesting and horrifying, but I have to say, the way the book is written, it is very hard to keep the people and their stories straight. The author jumps from one person to another throughout the book. I finally just decided to quit trying to remember everyone's story and just read. It took me weeks to read this book. Just not very well presented for me.
Zehaffy
I knew what would face me when I opened this book, as I have read extensively about the Nazis and their “final solution”, but I was wrong. After reading the book description, the Author’s Note, and the Foreword, I thought I was well-prepared, but I was wrong. This book is about twelve people who survived the Second World War by hiding in Berlin, then the capital of Germany. The stunning fact about these dozen people is that they are all Jewish. There were more Jewish survivors in Berlin than these twelve, but it is their stories of survival that are told in this book. They called it “going illegal” which means they had no I.D. (apart from their Jewish papers), and they usually had to have enough money, or a means of getting or earning some, so they could pay rent when they had to, and buy food on the black market, which was hugely expensive. They called themselves “U-boats”, as they needed the same stealth, skills, and courage as the crews of submarines.

Each story is not told complete before another is begun, but the beginning of each story is told, and then we go back to each person or couple, and pick up the threads of their stories and this continues throughout the book. It means the reader has to concentrate as it is quite easy to lose the thread of one couple after being immersed in the story of another. (I found it helpful to highlight the names so I could refresh my memory). All of them had help from Gentile friends, most German, but also the Swedish Church played a huge part. German Catholics, including clergy, were very helpful to Jews as they had much in common to fear from the Nazis, although, of course, that wasn’t their only reason.

This book details the lives of a dozen Jews who survived Hitler and his henchmen right in the very heart of the Third Reich. How they managed is chronicled in a way that reads like a thriller with heart-stopping moments, but also some very uplifting moments. This account is not just of the twelve, but of all those who helped them (and those who hunted them), and brought me to tears more than once. The tremendous risk taken by those who helped the Jews, and especially those who sheltered them, is a testament to their humanity and courage. This is one of the most vivid, accurate, and readable books on a subject that is unimaginable to most. It is very well-written and I found it totally engrossing, although very difficult at times. Well-done to Eric Lasher for doing much of the preliminary work, and to Leonard Gross for redoing Lasher’s research and also doing very extensive research of his own. This is a book that I can’t recommend highly enough.
Kerahuginn
Being a WWII historian, I have lost count of the number of books I have read on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. But The Last Jews in Berlin captured my attention and never let it go. The story focuses on the real life accounts of several Jews who actually stayed in Berlin, trying to hide from Gestapo. Relentlessly hunted by the Nazi regime and often betrayed by ordinary Germans willing to denounce them,these German Jews endured horrific situations just for the chance of life. Gross chronicles the lives of several Jews who were able to survive in Berlin till the end of the war. Their stories also include the tales of their family, friends, and neighbors who did not live till the liberation. These survival stories portray the absolute randomness to why one survives and one doesn't. Something as simple as crossing the street or hiding in an alley brought the wrath of the Gestapo, their torture, and death.
Besides the stories of the survivors, Gross also reveals a very dark underside to the frailty of Jewish existence in Berlin during the Nazi regime, the "catchers," Jews who betray other Jews to the Gestapo in exchange for their lives. Much has been written about the Kapos, Jews who worked in tandem with the Germans in the ghettos and camps, but little has been written about the catchers. Gross paints a riveting, suspenseful story revolving the betrayal of Jews by the fellow Jews. Whatever their personal motives, the catchers deserve all the ugly press heaped upon them. While it sounds harsh to pass judgement on these Jews, they were unrelenting in their betrayal and treachery.
Another aspect not often seen in Holocaust narratives is the kindness of strangers and friends who helped Jews survive. Gross's narrative reveals a huge underground network of sympathetic Germans and a small group of Swedes who willingly put their lives on the line,defying the Nazi regime. These brave souls provided food, shelter, false papers, ration coupons and so many other things necessary to allow the Jews to hide in plain sight. If caught, these caring people faced torture and death also. The small shreds of humanity provided by these people show how even in evil times,good people are capable of good works.
The Last Jews in Berlin is a must read for any WWII or history buff. Gross captures your attention from the first page and doesn't let go till the liberation. Written in a very matter of fact style, the horrors of the war and the determination of the Germans to destroy Jewish life in Berlin, The Last Jews offers an unrelenting, suspenseful account that keeps you riveted till the very last page.