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e-Book Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets epub download

e-Book Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets epub download

Author: Danny Rubie
ISBN: 1558704612
Pages: 136 pages
Publisher: Betterway Books (September 15, 1997)
Language: English
Category: Home Improvement & Design
Size ePUB: 1902 kb
Size Fb2: 1302 kb
Size DJVU: 1860 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 687
Format: lit doc docx txt
Subcategory: Home

e-Book Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets epub download

by Danny Rubie



Danny makes the job seem so much easier and his writing style makes you feel like he is right beside you guiding you through the process.

This particular book doesn't really work for me: FIrst off, he's building ugly, 1970's style cabinets. Danny makes the job seem so much easier and his writing style makes you feel like he is right beside you guiding you through the process.

Proulx's instruction is practical, easy to understand and time-tested, refined in his own shop, and taught by him in countless seminars and workshops.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How did you like the book?

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Danny Proulx opened his own custom kitchen-remodeling shop, Rideau Cabinets, in 1989. He is the author of Building Woodshop Workstations, Display Cases You Can Build, Build Your Own Home Office Furniture, Building More Classic Garden Furniture and Fast & Easy Techniques for Building Modern Cabinetry. He lives in Ontario, Canada. I think a good book on kitchen cabinet construction should cover different materials and construction techniques for building the cases, the pros/cons of each and the tools required for different approaches. A comparison of hardware - hinges and drawer slides - is essential.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Start by marking Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

by Proulx & Danny. At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, or a parent.

Build Your Own CNC Machine is the perfect book for hobbyists who like to build and create using wood and metal

Build Your Own CNC Machine is the perfect book for hobbyists who like to build and create using wood and metal. It's especially for those who have ever been foiled by lack of specific parts to help realize their creative designs. 138 pages PDF 9 MB. Building Cabinet Doors & Drawers.

Books related to Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets. Kitchen Cabinets Center: Your One Stop Guide for Everything Kitchen Cabinets Related. Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets. Guide to Building, Assembling, Refacing, Painting.

Superbly detailed, this one-of-a-kind book makes kitchen cabinet-making accessible to woodworkers of all skill levels.
in waiting
I've been buying books on kitchen cabinet construction in anticipation of building some cabinets for my house. This particular book doesn't really work for me:

FIrst off, he's building ugly, 1970's style cabinets. The cases are melamine coated particle board with oak face frames. Overlay door and drawers. Iron-on edge banding. That is a turn-off for me. If you want that kind of cabinet it's probably cheaper to go buy them at a discount big-go home center. Or Ikea.

Looking past the style and materials, there are nice pictures of the construction process he uses, dimensions and decent information to build this style of cabinet.

But there is no discussion of materials and hardware and alternate construction techniques. Inset doors or drawers? Forget it. THis book is kind of a one trick pony, if you want to build this particular style of cabinet it has all the information you need. Well, most of it, he shows pictures of arched top frame and panel doors but no information on making them.

I think a good book on kitchen cabinet construction should cover different materials and construction techniques for building the cases, the pros/cons of each and the tools required for different approaches. A comparison of hardware - hinges and drawer slides - is essential. Some guidance on planning the work, Bob Lang and Jim Tolpin cover this reasonably well. If you have to make a kitchen full of cabinets you need some sort of system to plan the work, organize the process and ensure you get all of the materials you need in fewer than 50 trips to the lumberyard.

I gave this three stars because the material it presents is well done, but it's inadequate coverage of the topic in my opinion.
Blackredeemer
I went through a bunch of books before I found Danny Prolux's books. They show detailed drawings of all cabinets including demensions. I have build 9 so far and everyone came out right and fits right. I had to make slight changes in dimensions because of different wood thickness, but outherwise page for page I followed his writings to the letter. For the home owner who wants to build his or her own kitchen cabinets, this book is a very good guide to do it with. And a big plus you can contact the author with questions by e-mail and he seems happy to help.
nailer
I'm in the process of building my own house and plan on building my own kitchen cabinets. Cabinet building has always kind of intimidated me, but after buying Danny's book i have the confidence to tackle the job myself. I've bought a few cabinet building books and quite frankly most of the writers are more tuned in to telling you their own little tricks of the trade to do things like they do, but they never get down to the "nuts and bolts" of actually doing the job.
Danny makes the job seem so much easier and his writing style makes you feel like he is right beside you guiding you through the process. His book also has drawings and dimensions and cut lists for various types of cabinets making the job so much easier for the novice cabinet maker, instilling a great deal of confidence (at least for me) to get the job done, and have it look great when you finish. I like that in his book he almost exclusively uses Melamine particleboard to make the cabinet carcasses. which is the basic material for European style cabinets and this method also saves you a good deal of money over laminated hardwood faced plywood cabinets The melamine coating is also easy to clean and very strong, and the use of hidden hinges and adjustable legs make for easy installation, a time saving feature. There are so many pluses to buying Danny's books that there just isn't enough room to list them all here. If you really are thinking of building your own kitchen cabinets this is the book to buy.
Akir
If you are interested in building cheap and ugly cabinets, this is the book for you. Most people would be far better served by going to their local Ikea or Home Depot and buying what's on sale.

There are 2 real issues with this book. First, everything in it is hideously ugly (as other reviewers have noted). There are a lot of pictures, which is a good thing. It warns you off building these things. The author is in love with particle board, and that esthetic infuses everything. If you thought the 80's were a heyday of kitchen design, this book is for you.

Secondly, the practical instructions aren't very good. I can sum up the entire book like this - make butt joints with particle board, and put on face frames with half overlap doors. If that sentence is helpful to you, then you don't need this book. If it isn't, you won't get much out of this book - that's as detailed as the instructions get, basically. The rest is just useless cut lists (if you don't want custom cabinets, why build them?)

I bought this book because its from Popular Woodworking (whose endorsement now means much less to me) and because of the ratings. Don't make the same mistake I did. Buy Lang's Kitchen Cabinet book instead, which is around 1000 times better.
Nayatol
I found this book clear and useful. I am building cabinets for my workshop,and its utilitarian approach is what I was looking for. If you are interested in solid wood, high end cabinets, it will prove less useful.

I did find an error (I think) in the calculation for cabinet drawers in the top diagram on page 100. Mr. Proulx includes the 3/4 (or 5/8) inch thickness of the bottom of the cabinet as part of the "free space", i.e., the area where drawers can be installed. This doesn't make sense to me. I believe the free space should be 28 1/4 inch, not 29 inches (for a 3/4 inch bottom), which throws the ensuing calculations off a bit. He also doesn't indicate the one inch clearance below the bottom drawer, but it is included in the calculation.

Still, this book works for me.