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e-Book Einstein's Refrigerator and Other Stories from Flip Side Of epub download

e-Book Einstein's Refrigerator and Other Stories from Flip Side Of epub download

Author: Steve Silverman
ISBN: 0740714198
Pages: 192 pages
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing (May 15, 2001)
Language: English
Category: Humor
Size ePUB: 1364 kb
Size Fb2: 1243 kb
Size DJVU: 1383 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 656
Format: lrf rtf docx txt
Subcategory: Humor

e-Book Einstein's Refrigerator and Other Stories from Flip Side Of epub download

by Steve Silverman



Einstein's Refrigerator reminds me of the Paul Harvey radio spot that used to appear every noon, decades ag. I read the chapter from which the title was derived, "Einstein's Refrigerator", and wondered why it was even in the book

Einstein's Refrigerator reminds me of the Paul Harvey radio spot that used to appear every noon, decades ago. He'd tell an interesting little story, break for an advertisement, and then tell you (dramatic pause) the REST of the story. The pieces were well constructed according to a formula, and if you think formulaic writing is bad writing, I beg you to reconsider. I read the chapter from which the title was derived, "Einstein's Refrigerator", and wondered why it was even in the book. There were no great secrets, nothing to stimulate you or make you say "Wow, thats' interesting". I struggled to make it half way through before I realized it was getting worse, not better.

Einstein’s refrigerator. 1 assurl you that every story contained in this book is absolutely true. Mankind is a very unusual beast and has created a history that is full of the wonderful and the truly bizarre.

In Einstein's Refrigerator, Silverman collects more than 30 of the most fascinating stories he has gathered-tales of forgotten genius, great blunders, and incredible feats of survival, as well as answers to puzzling questions. Einstein's Refrigerator is a remarkable book with spellbinding stories. Whatever happened to the refrigerator Einstein helped invent? While it never became a commercial success, its underlying concepts became the basis for cooling nuclear breeder reactors.

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Электронная книга "Einstein's Refrigerator: And Other Stories from the Flip Side of History", Steve Silverman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Einstein's Refrigerator: And Other Stories from the Flip Side of History" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Einstein's Refrigerator : And Other Stories from the Flip Side of History.

In Einstein’s Refrigerator, Silverman collects more than 30 of the most fascinating stories he has gathered–tales of forgotten genius, great blunders, and incredible feats of survival, as well as answers to puzzling questions. Einstein’s Refrigerator is a remarkable book with spellbinding stories.

Einstein's Refrigerator: And Other Stories from the Flip Side of History. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Steve Silverman was looking for a way to add some spice to his high school lectures when he realized that weird and bizarre true-life stories would capture his students' attention. In fact, they worked so well that the science teacher then began posting his discoveries to his own Web site, which he dubbed Useless Information. Well-researched and clearly sourced, Silverman's unusual tidbits have gained a wide following.In Einstein's Refrigerator, Silverman collects more than 30 of the most fascinating stories he has gathered--tales of forgotten genius, great blunders, and incredible feats of survival, as well as answers to puzzling questions.Einstein's Refrigerator is a remarkable book with spellbinding stories. Whatever happened to the refrigerator Einstein helped invent? While it never became a commercial success, its underlying concepts became the basis for cooling nuclear breeder reactors.
The Rollers of Vildar
Einstein's Refrigerator reminds me of the Paul Harvey radio spot that used to appear every noon, decades ago.

He'd tell an interesting little story, break for an advertisement, and then tell you (dramatic pause) the REST of the story. The pieces were well constructed according to a formula, and if you think formulaic writing is bad writing, I beg you to reconsider. It's no different than a baker using a recipe, to ensure that the bread he baked yesterday, bakes today, and will bake tomorrow is consistently good. That's the reason people flock to chain restaurants - they know exactly what to expect.

In Paul Harvey's case, one of the tricks he often used was to use an incomplete name - and when he told you that Donald John was the first name, the whole name was Donald John Trump, listeners hit their forehead with the heel of their hand, saying "I should've guessed that." Paul Harvey even did that with his own name, and his son, writer Paul Harvey Aurandt, Jr. used the family name, Paul Aurandt, before stepping into his father's shoes and using the Paul Harvey, Jr. name.

The strength - and weakness - of Einstein's Refrigerator is that it's a series of stories about different topics, connected only by the fact that they're all written to the same entertaining formula. The Jeff Goldblum character in The Big Chill deprecates the magazine he works for, a clone of People magazine, because the short articles are the perfect length for reading while on the toilet. It's not just People magazine, though, it's Reader's Digest, and Guideposts - and this book belongs there, too.

It's not suitable for reading in bed, because you'll never fall asleep; the conclusion of each item is too stimulating for that. It's not really suitable for extended reading in the evening, either, because you constantly are switching from one topic to another. It might be suitable for reading in waiting rooms, however, and that's where I read my copy, because I'm afraid my Kindle might not fare well if it gets wet.

It's a nice book, entertaining, and although it's formulaic, it's well written. A number of the topics were already known to me, yet the presentation made the topics well worth reading, anyway. Jeff Goldblum might disapprove of this book - but I liked it.
Malhala
It is one thing to understand what history is and write a book about it. It is a completely different thing to tell stories about history that will attract curious minds - regardless of their ages - and still explain the details in a fun way.

Needless to say, very few 'popular history' books actually delivered on the later count. This book achieved just that. It has a very interesting but not overloading style of talking about stories related to science and some of its weirdness and yet present them in great depth and details. If you read this second time, you will realize that the author investment quite some time in researching each of the stories (they are all real 'stories' of course). Most of the stories you can even read to young readers and see their eyes twinkle and imagination glow hearing these stories in front of your eyes.

It will keep you and them interested until the last page of the book. Overall, a very fun and informative experience.
Anarius
There are some stories so cool that everyone should read them. One is the story of homeless man Michael Malloy, a very durable drunkard. A Murder Trust picked him for easy insurance money, and gave him an unlimited bar tab, thinking he would drink himself to death. When that didn't work, they moved up to poisons, spoiled food, freezing him, and hitting him with cars. But he kept coming back for free drinks.

The author mentions this would be a good Hollywood story, but it's already been used as an episode of Spielberg's "Amazing Stories" (One For the Road).

He also writes up the Citicorp Tower story -- it was designed improperly, and turned out to be unstable in high winds of the sort that occur once a decade. A student figured it out. The tower's problems were corrected with extra stability plates and a large damper. This story was used as the basis of a "Numb3rs" episode (Structural Corruption).

Every single story is true and interesting, and the author writes well. Many of the stories will be familiar to a person who collects odd stories, but about half of these were new to me.
GAZANIK
Steve Silverman does a nice job of combining interesting stories with a learning experience. I'm an avid reader of science, political and research topics and found that many of his stories I have seen over the years. However, a young reader has probably not, so for that target audience this is a perfect work.

The book is written in a light, at times, tongue-in-cheek fashion-- a style that will no doubt appeal to younger readers. I actually felt that the book would find more of a reading audience at the middle-school (7th and 8th grade) reader level than high school.

The topics are varied and never dull. Silverman has a way of animating the characters and bringing them to life. Admittedly, animating an engineer can be a chore at times ( I speak from experience here) and he does a good job. A few of the characters are ripe for the picking of course, but in the end, they all get their day in the sun.

This book would be a good lead-in to finding topics for young readers to seek out more stories and further reading.

Dennis "K1"