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e-Book Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker epub download

e-Book Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker epub download

Author: Anthony Lane
ISBN: 0375714340
Pages: 784 pages
Publisher: Vintage (September 9, 2003)
Language: English
Category: Movies
Size ePUB: 1967 kb
Size Fb2: 1577 kb
Size DJVU: 1875 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 640
Format: mobi azw lrf doc
Subcategory: Humor

e-Book Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker epub download

by Anthony Lane



Nobody's Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane's trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy both the long addicted and the not so familiar. Start reading Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Anthony Lane has been a film critic for The New Yorker since 1993. His writings for The New Yorker are collected in the book Nobody’s Perfect.

Nobody’s Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane’s trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy .

Nobody’s Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane’s trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy both the long addicted and the not so familiar. Nobody’s Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane’s trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy both the long addicted and the not so familiar.

Nobody's Perfect book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Anthony Lane on Con Air- Advance word on Con Air said that it was.

In 1993, Anthony Lane left the 'squalling pit' of British journalism to become a film critic for the New Yorker. I was sitting in London when the call came through from Tina's office,' he writes in the introduction to Nobody's Perfect. I think I actually stood up to receive it, much as I would if a letter had come from the Vatican.

Lane, Anthony, 1962-. The New Yorker, Motion pictures, Rezension, Film. Books (Best-seller I ; Sex books ; Edward Lear ; Best-sellers II ;Vladimir Nabokov ; Cookbooks ; Cyril Connolly ; Ian Fleming ; . New York : Alfred A. Knopf. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Eliot ; Thomas Pynchon ; Bloom on Shapeskeare ; Matthew Arnold ; André Gide ; Evelyn Waugh ; . Sebald ; John Ruskin ; . Housman) - Profiles (The Sound of Music ; Eugène Atget ; Svankmajer ; Karl Lagerfeld ; Buster Keaton ; The Oscars ; Shakespeare on film ; Cannes ; Lego ; Obituaries ; Preston.

Anthony Lane's new collection of writings from his tenure at The New Yorker makes for an engaging, easy read. The question still stands as to whether film criticism should be easy. The "Books" section ably demonstrates Lane's familiarity with both contemporary and classic literature, while "Profiles," perhaps the strongest of the lot, chronicles the lives of artists, authors, and filmmakers in pieces that not so much take a stand as tell a story.

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He'd better be good: he's had the unenviable task at The New Yorker magazine of filling the shoes of Pauline Kael, arguably the most influential American critic of the latter part of the Twentieth Century

In his introduction to Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker, Lane mentions five maxims that "should be obeyed by anyone who, having tried and failed .

In his introduction to Nobody's Perfect: Writings from The New Yorker, Lane mentions five maxims that "should be obeyed by anyone who, having tried and failed to gain respectable employment, has decided to throw in the sponge and become a movie critic instead": 1) Never read the publicity material. 2) Whenever possible, see a film in the company of ordinary human beings. Interview of Anthony Lane by Robert Birnbaum (3 October 2002). Anthony Lane on Rotten Tomatoes.

Anthony Lane on Con Air—“Advance word on Con Air said that it was all about an airplane with an unusually dangerous and potentially lethal load. Big deal. You should try the lunches they serve out of Newark. Compared with the chicken napalm I ate on my last flight, the men in Con Air are about as dangerous as balloons.”Anthony Lane on The Bridges of Madison County—“I got my copy at the airport, behind a guy who was buying Playboy’s Book of Lingerie, and I think he had the better deal. He certainly looked happy with his purchase, whereas I had to ask for a paper bag.” Anthony Lane on Martha Stewart—“Super-skilled, free of fear, the last word in human efficiency, Martha Stewart is the woman who convinced a million Americans that they have the time, the means, the right, and—damn it—the duty to pipe a little squirt of soft cheese into the middle of a snow pea, and to continue piping until there are ‘fifty to sixty’ stuffed peas raring to go.”For ten years, Anthony Lane has delighted New Yorker readers with his film reviews, book reviews, and profiles that range from Buster Keaton to Vladimir Nabokov to Ernest Shackleton. Nobody’s Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane’s trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy both the long addicted and the not so familiar.
Arakus
I'm glad I purchased this book. Anthony Lane is a wonderful writer. I discovered him back in the 90's where he wrote film reviews in the New Yorker magazine. He still does write for the New Yorker, too. When I received the magazines, the first place I would go would be to read his latest film reviews. I even went so far as to tear them out and put them in a file folder, and so it was a great relief to find that he culled through his reviews from 1993 through 2001 and put them in this volume. This book has 752 pp and is divided into three sections, the first containing about 140 complete film reviews, the second containing book reviews, and the third holding profiles of famous people and more, so Mr. Lane's abilities range far and wide. A great find.
Ironrunner
If you love reading, you like the English language or you like intelligent writing this is a book that you cannot afford not to have. Anthony Lane should be considered a national treasure. His knowledge of everything, even of the most obscure facts about cinema, film history, acting, etc. Not only he has an encyclopeding knowledge but he is sharp and funny, in just the right amount. Have I forgotten to mention his superb writing technique? For the price of this book you will have hours and hours of one of the most remarkable minds of our time.
Thiama
Magnificent writer, broad cultural knowledge, rapier wit, brilliant humor.

The author not only reviews films for The New Yorker, but his reviews of persons, and books are outstanding.
Boraston
Reading Anthony Lane's movie and book reviews and profile pieces in NOBODY'S PERFECT, certain patterns emerge. One is that Lane's knowledge is encyclopedic. He had read or seen everything, and better yet, has an informed opinion. Secondly, Lane is not only the smartest person in any room, but also he's is attempting to be the funnest, which at times means he can end up being the most annoying. He confesses that his primary role as a critic is not to tell moviegoers what to see, but to provide a sense of the experience that will accompany watching. In that regard, Lane's reputation is rightly made for his negative reviews. Here are some of his best put downs.

1. Regarding Roland Joffe's claim that his film THE SCARLETT LETTER is "freely adapted from the novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne," Lane opines in the same way that methane is freely adapted from cows.

2. Balasko's FRENCH TWIST, "No film that starts with a disco remix of A WHITER SHADE OF PALE is heading for the higher ground."

3. Brad Pitt's MEET JOE BLACK, "I had heard vile rumors that MEET JOE BLACK ran for almost three hours. The rumors were true, but let's be fair: what matters is not how long a film is but how long it seems, and MEET JOE BLACK doesn't seem like a three-hour film at all. It seems like a ten-hour film."

4. "Who is responsible for CHARLIE'S ANGELS? According to the credits, it was 'directed by McG," thus raising the intriguing prospect of the world's first motion picture to be made by a hamburger."

5. "The last Michael Bay film, ARMAGGEDON, was a handy guild to what you should do when an asteroid bumps into your planet. At the time, most critics scorned the picture as deafening and dumb; in retrospect, it feels like a mature, even witty, exercise in self-reference, considering that the effect of watching a Michael Bay film is indistinguishable from having a large, pointy lump of rock drop on your head. His new picture, PEARL HARBOR, maintains the mood."

The best piece in the book, however, and the one that Lane obviously enjoyed himself the most is his loving look at THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK OF OBITUARIES. Recognizing genius at an unparalleled level, Lane at points is content to let certain obits speak for themselves, such as Sir Atholl Oakeley: "He started wrestling seriously after being beaten up by a gang of louts and built up his body by drinking eleven pints of milk a day for three years. The regimen had been recommended by the giant wrestler Hackenschmidt, who later told Oakeley that the quanity of milk prescribed had been a misprint."

Be warned, though, that reading Lane is like eating blueberry cheesecake. A little bit is just right given how rich his prose is.
Kigul
Haven't gotten too far in this very tick book, but have read enough of Lane's reviews to know why he's the best film crit working today.
Asher
A big, bloated and immensely enjoyable volume of Lane's collected writings; mostly movie reviews and essays on pop culture. Eminently quotable - though not exactly the easiest volume to tote along to the beach. I especially enjoyed the essay on "The Sound of Music," and the two on the bestsellers of today and yesteryear (I admire him for slogging through all those books that did not age gracefully and even more for admitting that he just could not get through several.) Unlike Ebert - who is a potato chip kind of movie critic easily absorbed but with no lasting nourishment - Lane's reviews often sound a deeper truth about how absurd the movie business - and society - is. It is especially fun to watch him taking aim at sacred cows and cherished pop icons alike. Ayn Rand, James Michener, Robin Williams, The Bridges of Madison County, and many more - watch out.