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e-Book The Far Euphrates epub download

e-Book The Far Euphrates epub download

Author: Aryeh Lev Stollman
ISBN: 1573226971
Pages: 224 pages
Publisher: Riverhead Trade; 1st Riverhead Trade Pbk. Ed edition (October 1, 1998)
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Size ePUB: 1124 kb
Size Fb2: 1639 kb
Size DJVU: 1762 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 616
Format: mobi mbr lrf mobi
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book The Far Euphrates epub download

by Aryeh Lev Stollman



Aryeh Lev Stollman is a writer and physician based in the United States. A neuroradiologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, he has also published several works of fiction.

Aryeh Lev Stollman is a writer and physician based in the United States. Born in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Windsor, Ontario, where his father was an Orthodox rabbi and professor and chairman of the English Department at the University of Windsor, Stollman studied at Yeshiva University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Stollman explores with great sensitivity our human frustrations with a universe that remains suspended somewhere between science and religion, appearing exquisitely rational at times but ultimately defying scientific explanation. The Washington Post. The Illuminated Soul is a profound novel that sheds light on holy patterns and their endless confusions.

The Far Euphrates book. In translucent prose, Aryeh Lev Stollman has created a stunning portrait of the coming of age of a young man's soul. Through the story of a lonely boy, The Far Euphrates questions how we can find meaning in a post-Holocaust world; how we define the notions of home and family; where the boundaries lie between sanity, madness, and transcendence; and what our responsibilities In translucent prose, Aryeh Lev Stollman has created a stunning portrait of the coming of age of a young.

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by. Stollman, Aryeh Lev. Publication date. New York : Riverhead Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Aryeh Lev Stollman's first novel, set in early 1960s Windsor, Canada, is a deep tale of isolation, secrecy, and .

Aryeh Lev Stollman's first novel, set in early 1960s Windsor, Canada, is a deep tale of isolation, secrecy, and eventual self-acceptance. Through the story of a lonely boy, "The Far Euphrates" questions how we can find meaning in a post-Holocaust world; how we define the notions of home and family; where the boundaries lie between sanity, madness, and transcendence; and what our responsibilities are to ourselves and to one another.

Aryeh Alexander, a rabbi's son, grows up in the 1960s in Windsor, Ontario Stollman expertly dramatizes both Alexander's inevitable fascination with the world outside his somewhat insular.

Aryeh Alexander, a rabbi's son, grows up in the 1960s in Windsor, Ontario. His doting extended family is dominated by his mother's childless best friend Berenice and by Hannalore, the twin sister of his father's Cantor and a survivor whose long-repressed memories of WW II Europe comprise one of several disillusioning lessons Alexander is fated to learn about the complex freedoms and burdens of adulthood.

Incredible’ – Observer. For me the find of the year was The Far Pavilions’ – Harry Secombe. A triumph’ – Spectator. Magnificen. ot one of its 950 pages is a page too much’ – Evening Standard. remarkable both for Stollman's eloquently understated prose and for the ease with which he constructs his artful plot. At the heart of The Far Euphrates lie the vexed questions raised by the Holocaust and its legacy: how we must try to solve for ourselves the riddle of God's existence and cultivate a sense of mercy in an unforgiving ag.

Aryeh Lev Stollman is a writer and physician based in the United States The Far Euphrates has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese and Hebrew.

Aryeh Lev Stollman is a writer and physician based in the United States Contents. The Far Euphrates has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese and Hebrew. His second novel, The Illuminated Soul (Riverhead), was published in 2002 and won the Harold U. Ribalow Prize for Jewish literature from Hadassah Magazine, and his short story collection The Dialogues of Time and Entropy (Riverhead) was published in 2003.

In a spiritually rich tale of the quest for peace and sanity in a post-Holocaust world, a lonely boy copes with an irresistible need to identify his origins and come to terms with his responsibilites to himself and to others. Reprint.
fr0mTheSkY
What has been called "Jewish-American literature" has largely been a misnomer -- it is really American literature with a here-and-there stereotyped "shtick" of Jewish ethnicity. Aryeh Lev Stollman's novel is a brilliant exception -- sensitively written, infused with a richly Jewish spirituality, haunted by memory, woven with love. This is a masterpiece of a first novel and one of the most moving I have read for a long, long time.
Dagdarad
Great book. Well written. Highly recommend it. It is mystical and a window into the jewish world. Came quickly. Affordable. No complaints. Amazon is reliable.
Water
interesting and surreal...needs discussion
Keth
I initially picked up this book (at the Salvation Army used books section) because on the back cover it had the following evaluation by Rebecca Goldstein (one of my favorite American authors): "The Far Euphrates is a beautiful book. Its radiance is not of the sun but of the moon:delicate, mournful, mysterious". And after having read the book in one sitting, I vehemently agree! I very much enjoyed it, and I felt a somewhat sweet and "fragile" connection to the characters. The main character, Alexander - or Aryeh, is the only son of a Rabbi (educated as a physicist) and a worried and embittered wife. The rest of the world is mainly composed of the Cantor and his wife Berniece, as well as the colorful and tragic figure of Hannalore - the cantor's twin ("sister"). There is also Marla, a very freaky yet strong and captivating presence in Alexander's life. We follow Alexander's narrative as he balances between sanity and mental turmoil, which is described so gently, yet vividly. I really like this "Jewish" book. I had never read much Jewish litterature before; however, after my discovery of Rebecca Goldstein and now Aryeh Lev Stollman, I find myself being drawn towards these unique writings...
Mr_NiCkNaMe
Some pretty turns of phrase and a shocking "secret" are not enough to save this story from the relentless, dull selfishness of its main protagonist. Young Aryeh Alexander is surrounded by characters who suffer and his main response to this is to stand there or to think about himself. This does not make for a thrilling narrative voice. His neurotic mother, for instance, fears for his health. He manages to terrify her by behaving in a way that the author suggests is introspective and wise beyond his years, but that mostly comes off as annoying:he locks himself in his room for a year, and this is supposed to parallel G-d drawing into himself before the act of creation. Fine. Alexander is also befriended by a quirky, fatally ill rich girl. His parents invite her to lunch and fly Alexander to her deathbed and later tell him that the good deed he did in befriending her will follow him the rest of his life like an angel, but it doesn't seem from the book that he said two words to her, or did anything nice for her on his own initiative. Finally, when confronted with the horrible "secret" of how his family's closest friends were treated in a concentration camp he doesn't react at all, largely because he knew the secret several chapters earlier in a hugely unsatisfying narrative bait and switch
MrRipper
I'm a bit puzzled how this novel won several awards. As every reviewer has noted, the writing is beautiful and poetic in its simplicity, though comparisons to Bernard Malamud and Hassidic folk tales seem far-fetched to me. For one thing, Malamud and just about any folklorist have a better sense of plot. The characters in this novel do not seem real or interesting or sympathetic--allowing that any one of these would have suited me just fine. Their motivations and the things that happen to them seem externally imposed by the author. The central character is narcissistic, neurotic, and naive, without apparently the author's being aware of it. The protagonist's infatuations with and judgments of the secondary characters have virtually nothing to do with the reader's own. The author fails to make us (or, at any rate, to make me) feel the same infatuation or judgment. I will admit that parts of the novel made me respond emotionally, but the response was provoked manipulatively for its own sake--for instance, the shock effect of the surprise "unveiling" at the end. I never felt that the book's poetry or sentiment directed me towards any sort of understanding or wisdom. Lots of characters die and we are hammered each time into some sort of response, but it would appear that Stollman's attentions are all on writing pretty prose (and it IS pretty) and not on having something to say.
Steel_Blade
This book is filled with wonderful characters and wonderful writing that keeps you reading even though you are not even sure what the actual plot is til the end. The story is about the coming of age of a very pensive and solitary Jewish boy. However, the story crosses the boundaries of Judaism to every reader. The main character's only friend his age dies and he is told a very dark secret about one of his closest adult friends -- something that happened during the Jewish Holocaust. This is too much for him. He locks himself in his room, covering the windows, & refusing to see the light of day for a year. His mother thinks that he is confirming her fear that her strange child has finally gone insane. However, this is the opportunity that the boy needs -- as everyone does -- to "find himself" and what he believes. Finally, his seclusion is over, his mother discovers the "secret" that so muddled her son's mind, and she is the one who, in the end, goes insane.