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e-Book Haweswater epub download

e-Book Haweswater epub download

Author: Sarah Hall
ISBN: 0571209300
Pages: 288 pages
Publisher: Gardners Books (July 31, 2003)
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Size ePUB: 1201 kb
Size Fb2: 1414 kb
Size DJVU: 1188 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 717
Format: docx mobi txt lit
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Haweswater epub download

by Sarah Hall



FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The village of Marsdale is a quiet corner of the world, cradled in a remote dale in England's lovely Lake District.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The rhythm of life in the deeply religious.

The road he took into the valley was slow and winding and littered with ragged-looking sheep, but he drove it almost daily, arriving in the afternoon, and leaving in darkness.

The road he took into the valley was slow and winding and littered with ragged-looking sheep, but he drove it almost daily, arriving in the afternoon, and leaving in darkness n road to Shap and then down past Swindale and Rosgill to the valley, but instead came by a more direct route through the villages of Askham, Helton and Bampton. It was more scenic, more direct as the crow flew. On this route he encountered several gates along the way, which were chained to posts to keep livestock separate from each other and out of the neighbouring fields.

Haweswater Sarah Hall 'Sarah Hall's ambitious and accomplished first novel deals with destruction and . By the book's close, not only has Hall thoroughly imagined her liquid world, but water has swept everyone and everything away.

Haweswater Sarah Hall. Second impression: unremitting melancholy. Hall treats her characters with kindness, entering with sympathy into the mindset of a different world. the writing is capable of immense control and poise and.

And Sarah Hall brings all of this back to life, using words oh so beautifully. And then there’s the human story, a story that lays bare the emotional consequences of the flooding of the valley.

Haweswater is a 2002 novel by British writer Sarah Hall, set in Mardale at the time of the building of the dam and flooding of the valley. It won the 2003 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for a First book

Haweswater is a 2002 novel by British writer Sarah Hall, set in Mardale at the time of the building of the dam and flooding of the valley. It won the 2003 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for a First book. The novel was released in the United States as a paperback original in October 2006, by Harper Perennial. Hawes Water is described in Anthony Trollope's novel Can You Forgive Her?

Sarah Hall was born in Cumbria in 1974. She is the author of Haweswater, which won the 2003 Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Novel, a Society of Authors Betty Trask Award, and a Lakeland Book of the Year prize.

Sarah Hall was born in Cumbria in 1974. She received a BA from Aberystwyth University, Wales, and a MLitt in Creative Writing from St Andrews, Scotland. In 2004, her second novel, The Electric Michelangelo, was short-listed for the Man Booker prize, the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Eurasia region), and the Prix Femina Etranger, and was long-listed for the Orange Prize for Fiction.

The prizewinning debut from Britain's most exciting contemporary novelist. In a remote dale in a northern English county, a centuries-old rural community has survived into the mid-1930s almost unchanged. But then Jack Liggett drives in from the city, the spokesman for a Manchester waterworks company with designs on the landscape for a vast new reservoir. The dale must be evacuated, flooded, devastated; its water pumped to the Midlands and its community left in ruins.

Read Haweswater, by Sarah Hall online on Bookmate – The village of Marsdale is a quiet corner of the world, cradled in a remote dale in England's lovely Lake District.

The village of Marsdale is a quiet corner of the world, cradled in a remote dale in England's lovely Lake District.

Haweswater - Sarah Hall. 2 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

The prizewinning debut from Britain's most exciting contemporary novelist.

In a remote dale in a northern English county, a centuries-old rural community has survived into the mid-1930s almost unchanged. But then Jack Liggett drives in from the city, the spokesman for a Manchester waterworks company with designs on the landscape for a vast new reservoir. The dale must be evacuated, flooded, devastated; its water pumped to the Midlands and its community left in ruins.

Liggett further compounds the village's problems when he begins a troubled affair with Janet Lightburn, a local woman of force and character who is driven to desperate measures in an attempt to save the valley.

Told in luminous prose, with an intuitive sense for period and place, Haweswater remembers a rural England that has been lost for many decades.

Thordira
As the first reviewer, I'll summarize the story, which is a fictionalized account of the construction of an actual dam called Haweswater in the Lake District of northern England, resulting in the flooding of a valley by the reservoir, and the loss of the community and its traditions. The water company, towns and other landmarks actually existed; the individuals did not and the timing also differs somewhat.

In 1936, Jack Liggett comes to town to prepare for the construction of the dam and the destruction of life as the locals know it. Some grudingly accept the inevitable and others hold out for a change in plans that never comes. The first 40 pages (the book is only 266 pages in paperback) set the scene of the hard, rural life and introduce Janet Lightburn and her family.

Then Jack arrives to sell the plans and move the project forward, prepared to deal with the natives' resistance, and we get another view of local life from his perspective and his changing appreciation for what it offers. Jack isn't quite the elite city boy he appears to be. We can easily tell that Jack and Janet are headed for a relationship and that trouble will result. The author is not particularly light with the touch in describing Janet and her mother and their respective emotional turmoil. Hall is better with how Janet works closely with her father in the menial chores raising sheep and farming. The inevitable relationship seems a bit forced. After all, Janet is only 18 and Jack is 30-something, and, to be honest, not much happens between them other than passionate, rough rendevous. No introspective dialog or philosophizing about a life together, or even romance, for example.

Eventually Jack and Janet's affair (he's married) becomes public, and it's also time for the locals to evacuate. A terrible accident occurs, setting in motion the rapid decline of one of our main characters and an explosive climax.

Sarah Hall writes wonderfully, and her debut novel shows talent that could well lead to future, successful novels. (Her second novel was well-received.) Hall's love for the scene of Haweswater and respect for the rural life, its people and its tradition all come through clearly. Many passages are quite evocative and imaginative, although occasionally overwritten, when simpler language would have sufficed. I felt Janet's character was a bit much, too, pushed to a rather unrealistic position. Janet's father Samuel is a more sympathetic, stronger and better drawn character.
Memuro
The previous reviewer did a lovely job laying out the basic plot. Perhaps one of the flaws with the book was just how basic the plot was--with such a simple storyline, the author had to work very hard to include enough complexity to maintain a full-fledged novel. One place that could have used more complexity--likely improving the book as a whole--was the character development. There remained throughout the book a certain distance that I felt we never breached between the reader and the characters. Janet was difficult to know, as were her family members and certainly her love interest.

The writing, however, was nearly without exception very lovely to read. Her phrasing and descriptions are beautiful and original, and she translates her fascination with the place and time into interest for the reader.

Without giving anything away, I have to admit that I found the ending somehow both predictable and disappointing.

Worth reading for the lovely prose, and I expect that her second effort (I have yet to read it) will deliver more sustenance in terms of story.
Quinthy
Haweswater may be one of the most extraordinary debut novels I've had the good fortune to come across. I have read several of Sarah Hall's novels at this point and can say she's truly a remarkable author.
Thoginn
Loved this.
Black_Hawk_Down
Didn't have expectations
Hasirri
I'd hazard a guess in saying that Sarah Hall may have written a Lakes classic; the 'recent' history of the Water adds depth to it.
Vonalij
so slow and boring I had to force myself to finish it