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e-Book Red Box Murders epub download

e-Book Red Box Murders epub download

Author: Rex Stout
ISBN: 0816132232
Pages: 448 pages
Publisher: G. K. Hall & Company; Large type edition edition (February 1982)
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Size ePUB: 1731 kb
Size Fb2: 1737 kb
Size DJVU: 1884 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 388
Format: txt doc lit mbr
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Red Box Murders epub download

by Rex Stout



The Red Box is the fourth Nero Wolfe detective novel by Rex Stout. Prior to its first publication in 1937 by Farrar & Rinehart, In. the novel was serialized in five issues of The American Magazine (December 1936 – April 1937)

The Red Box is the fourth Nero Wolfe detective novel by Rex Stout. the novel was serialized in five issues of The American Magazine (December 1936 – April 1937). Adapted twice for Italian television, The Red Box is the first Nero Wolfe story to be adapted for the American stage. Wolfe and Archie investigate the death of a model who ate a piece of poisoned candy

Rex Todhunter Stout (/staʊt/; December 1, 1886 – October 27, 1975) was an American writer noted for his detective fiction.

Rex Todhunter Stout (/staʊt/; December 1, 1886 – October 27, 1975) was an American writer noted for his detective fiction. His best-known characters are the detective Nero Wolfe and his assistant Archie Goodwin, who were featured in 33 novels and 39 novellas between 1934 and 1975. In 1959, Stout received the Mystery Writers of America's Grand Master Award.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana . Three Doors to Death. The red box. A Bantam Crime Line Book, published by arrangement with the estate of the author.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers.

This is a bibliography of works by or about the American writer Rex Stout (December 1, 1886 – October 27, 1975), an American writer noted for his detective fiction. He began his literary career in the 1910s, writing more than 40 stories that appeared primarily in pulp magazines between 1912 and 1918. He wrote no fiction for more than a decade, until the late 1920s, when he had saved enough money through his business activities to write when and what he pleased.

Rex Stout And a girl's been murdered, and others are in great and immediate peril, and you rant like Booth and Barrett about a taxicab in a maelstrom

The Red Box. Chapter One. Wolfe looked at our visitor with his eyes wide open-a sign, with him, either of indifference or of irritation. And a girl's been murdered, and others are in great and immediate peril, and you rant like Booth and Barrett about a taxicab in a maelstrom. I appreciate good acting; I ought to, since I'm in show business. But in your case I should think there would be times when a decent regard for human suffering and misfortune would make you wipe off the make-up.

Электронная книга "The Rubber Band/The Red Box 2-in-1", Rex Stout. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Rubber Band/The Red Box 2-in-1" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

com's Rex Stout Author Page. The Nero Wolfe corpus was nominated Best Mystery Series of the Century at Bouchercon XXXI, the world's largest mystery convention, and Rex Stout was nominated Best Mystery Writer of the Century. In addition to writing fiction, Stout was a prominent public intellectual for decades. Stout was active in the early years of the American Civil Liberties Union and a founder of the Vanguard Press.

Royal decree: conversations with Rex Stout. Stout, Rex - Nero Wolfe - The World Series Murder (aka This Won't Kill You). Stout, Rex - Nero Wolfe 04 - The Red Box. Stout Rex. Download (RTF). Download (LRF).

Then, a murdered policeman leaves a clue folded in a newspaper, and Wolfe has to read the fine print to decipher his killer's identity

The clam shell box includes the complete set of 32 recipes on cream-colored heavy stock paper plus the signed Nero Wolfe letter and Menu. Any idea when this was made, any known limitation et. Thanks. Then, a murdered policeman leaves a clue folded in a newspaper, and Wolfe has to read the fine print to decipher his killer's identity. And what do you do when a chimp is the only witness to a crime? This is no time for monkeyshines from the world's most celebrated armchair detective.

Akinohn
This is one of my favorites of the Nero Wolfe books. There aren't too many characters, and the ones that are there have their personalities pretty well defined. The ending/resolution is satisfactory. As usual, Stout doesn't leave many clues so you. An try to solve it yourself, and there's certainly no way that anyone could be expected to guess the specifics of the ending, but it is possible to guess the murderer. Also, it's kind of a fun story and the main character is actually likable. Unfortunately, one of the other most likable characters gets murdered, but it's still q great book. It's fun to watch Wolfe catch people in lies, and there are some humorous parts, as well. He uses the term "ortho-cousins" a lot, which just means cousins of siblings who are of the same sex (the siblings, not the cousins). There is a discussion of whether these kinds of cousins can marry. Clearly not, because theoretically ortho-cousins and cross-cousins (where the siblings are of different sexes) are both first cousins, and first cousins can't marry. However, this book was written close to 80 years ago, so things have changed. Wolfe's first client is pretty unlikable, but that doesn't change how good the book is. I read it twice in less than a week. If you like Nero Wolfe, you'll not this one a lot, in my opinion.
Goldcrusher
Stout " The Red Box", takes place in New York in the '30s but you wouldn't know most Americans were suffering through the "Great Depression" but Americans loved distractions and a Nero Wolfe mystery was like a erudite and intelligent Busby Berkeley musical.

We have three corpses in this one and the Frost family whose heiress Helen Frost will soon turn 21 and will get a 2 million inheritance from her late father.

The story begins with the death of a young model being spoken of by Lew Frost to Nero Wolfe asking Wolfe to persuade his " ortho-cousin" (cousins where the siblings are of the same gender; "cross-cousins" are the opposite. When reading Stout, expect to be using the dictionary a good deal), Helen Frost, to leave her modeling job for designer McNab, whom she calls her best friend.

Wolfe's first job is to determine for whom the poisoned candy was intended since the young model "swipped" a large box of candy. Another model ate some candy that was different and suffered no ill effects.

I get a big kick out of Stout' s mysteries of the '30s because it truly is like entering another, very surreal world".
Adrietius
I was introduced to the world of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin as a young man, and I do believe I read most of the novels during that period. I am now reading them anew after more than 30 years, and they haven't lost a bit of their charm.

"The Red Box" is quintessential Wolfe. He is faced with a case that even he admits is insoluble. It requires all of his considerable intelligence to bring the guilty party to justice. You'll have to be sharp to spot the murderer in this one before its tense denouement—and you may think twice before reaching for a sweet from that next box of chocolates.
Andronrad
"The Red Box" was written right after "The Rubber Band," which I have also reviewed. As I said in that review, I've been a fan of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries for more than thirty years. "The Red Box" is another excellent early example of Rex Stout's characters. This was published in 1937. As with "The Rubber Band," students of history will find great historical details accurately in "The Red Box." Rex Stout's writing never lacks quality. There is very little violence that takes place in any Nero Wolfe mystery because they are all first-person narratives, with Archie describing any violence factually rather than emotionally. There is only implied sexual activity, but not actual content. As with Stout's other Nero Wolfe mysteries, this is definitely re-readable.
Hasirri
It was a bit hard to keep my attention span on this book. I liked it especially the end (no, I won't say what happens). It required your attention to follow the action, which in my mind, was a lot. I compare Nero Wolfe with Ellery Queen mysteries. I've only got bks 1-6 -4 to go until I'm finished for awhile with Nero. I like Diane Mott Davidson, Rita Mae Brown, Joan Hess (both Claire and Maggody Ar.) So enjoy!
Agamaginn
I can't speak highly enough of "The Red Box," the 4th in the series of Rex Stout books based on Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin. Each book can be read as a 'stand alone' so don't fear just diving in where a story idea may catch your fancy. Should you decide on "The Red Box" you won't be disapppointed. This is a great whodunnit that uses all of Nero's detecting genius and Archie's shoe leather and world skills! Rex Stout's use of the English language is a treat, not just in the writing, but in the speech of the great Nero. Told from the perspective of Archie, the audience has a "fly on the wall" perspective of the world of Nero Wolfe. You won't be disappointed and will find yourself detecting and laughing along with Wolfe and Goodwin.
ChallengeMine
This forth of the Nero Wolfe series is another great read. I could write the same review for each book because so far they are all suspenseful, compelling and entertaining as I read them in chronological order as to their publishing dates. Wolfe is such an interesting character. He has no regard for political correctness. Archie is brilliant in his manipulative techniques to satisfy Wolfe's demands and needs. These books are so fun!!
Captivating characters. Delicious dialogue. Piquant plot. At the center of it all is the Urban Huck Finn, aka Archie Goodwin, aka the irresistibly charming force and the Gigantic Genius, aka Nero Wolfe, aka the Immoveable Object. It all adds up to crackling good mystery.