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e-Book The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory epub download

e-Book The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory epub download

Author: David R. Loy
ISBN: 0861713664
Pages: 228 pages
Publisher: Wisdom Publications; 2003 edition (October 1, 1997)
Language: English
Category: Essays & Correspondence
Size ePUB: 1772 kb
Size Fb2: 1472 kb
Size DJVU: 1573 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 415
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Subcategory: Literature

e-Book The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory epub download

by David R. Loy



David R. Loy's previous books include the acclaimed Money, Sex, War, Karma, The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, and The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, a finalist for the 2006 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award

David R. Loy's previous books include the acclaimed Money, Sex, War, Karma, The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, and The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, a finalist for the 2006 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award. He was the Besl Professor of Ethics/Religion and Society at Cincinnati's Xavier University.

The Great Awakening book. In "The Great Awakening" Buddhist teachings and Western social analysis meet and form a dynamic Buddhist social theory.

A Buddhist Social Theory K. David R. Loy. Wisdom Publications, Boston. Wisdom Publications 199 Elm Street Somerville, MA 02144. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photography, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system or technologies now known or later developed, without permission in writing from the publisher.

David R.

In "The Great Awakening," scholar and Zen teacher David Loy examines how these three poisons, embodied in society's institutions . This book addresses such issues with Loy's brilliant social theory on Buddhism.

In "The Great Awakening," scholar and Zen teacher David Loy examines how these three poisons, embodied in society's institutions, lie at the root of all social maladies as well.

In The Great Awakening, scholar and Zen teacher David Loy examines how these three poisons, embodied in. .

In The Great Awakening, scholar and Zen teacher David Loy examines how these three poisons, embodied in society's institutions, lie at the root of all social maladies as well. This book will help both Buddhists and non-Buddhists to realize the social importance of Buddhist teachings, while providing a theoretical framework for socially engaged members of society to apply their spiritual principles to collective social issues. The Great Awakening shows how Buddhism can help our postmodern world develop liberative possibilities otherwise obscured by the anti-religious bias of so much contemporary social theory.

Buddhist sociology, Buddhism, Religious life, Buddhism and social problems. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. org on August 24, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

rev3 4/16/03 2:23 PM Page i The Great Awakening A Buddhist Social Theory K David R. Loy Wisdom Publications, Boston Great Awakening.

The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory develops the social implications of Buddhist teachings for our understanding (and response to) collective forms of dukkha (suffering). Today the "three poisons" – greed, ill will, and delusion – have been institutionalized

The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory develops the social implications of Buddhist teachings for our understanding (and response to) collective forms of dukkha (suffering). Today the "three poisons" – greed, ill will, and delusion – have been institutionalized.

oceedings{Loy2003TheGA, title {The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory}, author {David Loy}, year {2003} }. David Loy. The kettle residue oil containing entrained catalyst from the fractionation of catalytically converted hydrocarbon oil is passed through a settler and then. The kettle residue oil containing entrained catalyst from the fractionation of catalytically converted hydrocarbon oil is passed through a settler and then centrifuged to produce an oil of suitably low ash content. The catalyst from the settler and the catalyst fines from the centrifugation are recycled to the reactor thereby eliminating the disposal of an oily catalyst residue

The most essential insight that Buddhism offers is that all our individual suffering arises from three and only three sources, known in Buddhism as the three poisons: greed, ill-will, and delusion. In The Great Awakening, scholar and Zen teacher David Loy examines how these three poisons, embodied in society's institutions, lie at the root of all social maladies as well. The teachings of Buddhism present a way that the individual can counteract these to alleviate personal suffering, and in the The Great Awakening Loy boldly examines how these teachings can be applied to institutions and even whole cultures for the alleviation of suffering on a collective level.This book will help both Buddhists and non-Buddhists to realize the social importance of Buddhist teachings, while providing a theoretical framework for socially engaged members of society to apply their spiritual principles to collective social issues. The Great Awakening shows how Buddhism can help our postmodern world develop liberative possibilities otherwise obscured by the anti-religious bias of so much contemporary social theory.
Modifyn
I love this book. Loy's analysis is rich and insightful. His Buddhist perspective allows him to see social problems in a new light. His arguments also echo what might be called a "relational social theory" that can be found in many cutting edge social theories. Well worth the read.
Jozrone
The information was great, but I feel like it is a little less accessible for someone who knows nothing of Buddhism than his other books. Still, it is wonderful if you want a more in depth look at where he is coming from in his other books. Please, don't let it be the first book you read by David R Loy. I would recommend you read Money Sex War Karma first, but that is just my opinion based on my preferences.
Alianyau
This book is not just for Buddhists. Anyone who wishes to see clearly the moral hole we have dug for ourselves here in the West, especially economically and politically, will profit from reading this important book. Gets to the root of the corruption plaguing our global system.
Zonama
With his strong comparative philosophy background, David Loy explores contemporary issues from a Zen perspective. He illuminates many dimensions of institutional and policy problems. This is an important, pioneering work in an ongoing field of investigation.
Ynneig
Attended a lecture was giving in Boulder, Colorado. Very interesting fellow, who brings a perspective to buddhsm that is rarely discussed.
Shistus
This collection of essays by David Loy provides an excellent framework for socially engaged Buddhism. As he notes in his introduction, quoting Thich Nhat Hanh, there should be no need for "socially engaged Buddhism" because all Buddhism is by definition socially engaged. No separate selves means we are one will all Others, and hence compassion should flow automatically from the basic Buddhist insight.

However, in reality this is far from the case. Far too much of "actually existing Buddhism" is not much more than the search for inner peace of comfortable middle class individuals. Therefore Loy's exploration of "social dukkha" is quite valuable and necessary. Loy's approach is simple -- take the fundamental concepts taught by the Buddha and apply them at the social level. So dukkha is the basic condition of discomfort, or suffering. The Buddha taught that our dukkha is caused by tanha -- craving or thirst. This craving is like a bottomless pit we cannot fill. "Happiness cannot be gained by satisfying desire, for thirst means there is not end to it." We must *transform* our desire. Tanha manifests in three ways, known as the Three Poisons -- lobha (greed), dosa (ill will, or anger), and moha (delusion, or ignorance). Buddhism aims to transform them into generosity (dana), compassion (karuna), and wisdom (prajna).

Where the problem and solution are typically seen at the individual level, Loy's essays address this transformation at the collective level of society. Buddhist social praxis involves transforming our selves and transforming social institutions so they are no longer based on limitless production and consumption for some while others starve (capitalism), no longer based on endless cycles of violence (war and the Demonization of the Other), no longer based on the delusion of our being separate from and superior to other species and the Earth, resulting in the ecological crisis.

1) Buddhist Social Theory?
2) Buddhism and Poverty
3) Pave the Planet or Wear Shoes?
4) Can Corporations Become Enlightened?
5) The Nonduality of Good and Evil: Buddhist Reflections on the New Holy War
6) How to Reform a Serial Killer
7) Zen and the Art of War
8) Remaking Ourselves: On the Duality Between Nature and Technology
9) Loving the World As Our Own Body: The Nondualist Ethics of Taoism, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology
Afterward: A Nondual Social Theory

Much of the social praxis Loy recommends could be arrived at, and is arrived at, by many people who are not Buddhists. What Buddhism offers to social praxis that is profound is the deep insight into our true nature, into selflessness, the ground of compassion. This prajna makes this book valuable to all progressive social activists. At the same time, Loy's book is valuable to all Buddhists because it articulates what is left out of too much Buddhist practice, and that is acting on the collective level and not just the individual level.

If we have truly internalized the Boddhisatva Vow -- "I vow to liberate all sentient beings" -- then we should incorporate social activism into our practice. Buddhist practice should no more be only on the mat than should Christianity be practiced only while at church!

Namaste.

(verified purchase from a large brick-and-mortar bookstore)
porosh
David Loy in this magnificent text opens up to us by facing three crucial issues facing us in our modern times, the three poisons the Buddha called hindrances to practice. Ignorance, anger, and greed. These are the source of all suffering not just for individuals, but entire societies and even companies. This book addresses such issues with Loy's brilliant social theory on Buddhism.
Loy takes aim at big business in this work, showing his skepticism in saying that corporations and the globalization of world trade are certainly not realities which seem to be motivated by love and compassion (as politicians will have us believe); rather, they are motivated by greed. And it's a regrettable truth, that companies are out for two things: more profit, and more power. Of course, these companies are not the only problem. Because where you have a profiteering business, you find consumers. These consumers, especially those in Western culture, are in many ways like the hungry ghosts of Buddhism. Buddhism, as do most religious traditions, faces the reality of greed head on. It emphasizes the need to control it.
Who's accountable for this pressure on growth? Consumerism has taken over with a life completely of it's own. Many people are probably either oblivious to it or don't really want to face this subtle but all too apparent truth. Everyone is to blame, and therefore it must be tackled individually. The only way this can be accomplished is by eradicating our own innate tendency to support it all. The lack of responsibility, in short, embodies what is both happening today and why things are not changing. There are not many individuals standing up to take action. The world is basically in the hands of, in the current era, big business. This is scarecly a new insight for you and I. But the point of all of this, Loy stresses, is that somewhere for a breaking away of such practices to occur, we must have individuals willing to make sacrifices in order to accomplish such a task. That calling is for you and I. This book is so very engaging, won't you buy it?
I was very impressed with the speed of delivery for this item. The item was in very good condition as well. Thank you.