» » Heyday: A Novel
e-Book Heyday: A Novel epub download

e-Book Heyday: A Novel epub download

Author: Kurt Andersen
ISBN: 0812978463
Pages: 622 pages
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (December 26, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Size ePUB: 1298 kb
Size Fb2: 1773 kb
Size DJVU: 1827 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 232
Format: rtf docx lit txt
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Heyday: A Novel epub download

by Kurt Andersen



Электронная книга "Heyday: A Novel", Kurt Andersen Heyday is a brilliantly imagined, wildly entertaining tale of America’s boisterous coming of age–a sweeping panorama of madcap rebellion and overnight fortunes, palaces an. .

Электронная книга "Heyday: A Novel", Kurt Andersen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Heyday: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Heyday is a brilliantly imagined, wildly entertaining tale of America’s boisterous coming of age–a sweeping panorama of madcap rebellion and overnight fortunes, palaces and brothels, murder and revenge–as well as the story of a handful of unforgettable characters discovering the nature of freedom, loyalty, friendship, and true love.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Heyday is a brilliantly imagined, wildly entertaining tale of America’s boisterous coming of age–a sweeping panorama of madcap rebellion and overnight fortunes.

Heyday is a brilliantly imagined, wildly entertaining tale of America’s boisterous coming of age–a sweeping panorama of madcap rebellion and overnight fortunes, palaces and brothels, murder and revenge–as well as the story of a handful of unforgettable characters discovering the nature of freedom, loyalty, friendship, and true love.

Kurt Andersen is an author, radio show host, and journalist. Kurt Andersen is the author of the novels True Believers, Heyday, and Turn of the Century, and has written for film, television, and stage

Kurt Andersen is an author, radio show host, and journalist. His forthcoming book, Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire will be published in September 2017. Kurt Andersen is the author of the novels True Believers, Heyday, and Turn of the Century, and has written for film, television, and stage. He is the host and co-creator of the Peabody Award winning Studio 360, a weekly radio show about arts and culture.

Also by Kurt Andersen. America is a land of wonders, in which everything is in constant motion and every change seems an improvemen.No natural boundary seems to be set to the efforts of man; and in his eyes what is not yet done is only what he has not yet attempted to do. -ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE, Democracy in America, 1835. If I venture to displace, by even the billionth part of an inch, the microscopical speck of dust which lies now upon the point of my finger, what is the character of that act upon which I have adventured?

The official page of Kurt Andersen  .

Kurt Andersen (born August 22, 1954) is an American writer and host of the Peabody-winning public radio program Studio 360, a production of Public Radio International. Andersen was born in Omaha, Nebraska, and graduated from Westside High School. In 1986 with E. Graydon Carter he co-founded Spy magazine, which they sold in 1991; it continued publishing until 1998.

Kurt Andersen’s Heyday is part of a subgenre that I love – a giant Victorian novel (with slightly more independent women and much more sex and swearing than an actual Victoria novel – Deadwood Lite if you will.

Although Heyday is a historical novel conceived on a grand scale, it is also a walking, talking almanac. Like many a handsome and meticulously produced volume, Kurt Andersen’s Heyday ends with a grace note explaining the history and particulars of its typeface. Usually this kind of coda stands apart from the book’s substance. In this case it’s entirely consistent with what has come before. Although Heyday is a historical novel conceived on a grand scale, it is also a walking, talking almanac. Classifications, notations, translations, amplifications, derivations and formulations are not tangential to Mr. Andersen’s story. In a very real way they constitute the book’s main event.

Heyday is a brilliantly imagined, wildly entertaining tale of America’s boisterous coming of age–a sweeping panorama of madcap rebellion and overnight fortunes, palaces and brothels, murder and revenge–as well as the story of a handful of unforgettable characters discovering the nature of freedom, loyalty, friendship, and true love.In the middle of the nineteenth century, modern life is being born: the mind-boggling marvels of photography, the telegraph, and railroads; a flood of show business spectacles and newspapers; rampant sex and drugs and drink (and moral crusades against all three); Wall Street awash with money; and giddy utopian visions everywhere. Then, during a single amazing month at the beginning of 1848, history lurches: America wins its war of manifest destiny against Mexico, gold is discovered in northern California, and revolutions sweep across Europe–sending one eager English gentleman off on an epic transatlantic adventure. . . .Amid the tumult, aristocratic Benjamin Knowles impulsively abandons the Old World to reinvent himself in New York, where he finds himself embraced by three restless young Americans: Timothy Skaggs, muckraking journalist, daguerreotypist, pleasure-seeker, stargazer; the fireman Duff Lucking, a sweet but dangerously damaged veteran of the Mexican War; and Duff’s dazzling sister Polly Lucking, a strong-minded, free thinking actress (and discreet part-time prostitute) with whom Ben falls hopelessly in love.Beckoned by the frontier, new beginnings, and the prospects of the California Gold Rush, all four set out on a transcontinental race west–relentlessly tracked, unbeknownst to them,by a cold-blooded killer bent on revenge.A fresh, impeccable portrait of an era startlingly reminiscent of our own times, Heyday is by turns tragic and funny and sublime, filled with bona fide heroes and lost souls, visionaries (Walt Whitman, Charles Darwin, Alexis de Tocqueville) and monsters, expanding horizons and narrow escapes. It is also an affecting story of four people passionately chasing their American dreams at a time when America herself was still being dreamed up–an enthralling, old-fashioned yarn interwoven with a bracingly modern novel of ideas. "In this utterly engaging novel, the author of Turn of the Century brings 19th-century America vividly to life . . . While this is a long book, it moves quickly, with historical detail that's involving but never a drag on the action; the characters are beautifully drawn. A terrific book; highly recommended." Library Journal"Heyday is fuled by manic energy, fanatical research, and a wicked sense of humor.... It's a joyful, wild gallop through a joyful, wild time to be an American." -Vanity FairFrom the Hardcover edition.
Urtte
A unique picture of Paris, (a French Revolution), New York, and California in the 1840's. Told mostly through the eyes of a wealthy young British aristocrat being chased by a French soldier, through a case of mistaken identity. Ben, the Brit travels from Paris to London and then on to New York to seek his fortune. Unknown to him, the French soldier is seeking revenge for the death of his brother at the start of the revolution in Paris. In New York, Ben makes friends with a journalist, Skaggs, and his friends, a brother and sister couple Duff and Polly Lucking. After being treated to the look, feel, taste, and the smell of the New York City of the 1840s, Ben, Skaggs and Duff head west looking for Polly who had taken off earlier with a young girl prostitute, Priscilla. Ben just misses the arrival of the French Soldier still in search of him. They travel to New Orleans and catch a boat across the Gulf of Mexico to eventually hook up with a guide who canoes them through the Isthmus to the Pacific Ocean where they are picked up by a ship and taken to San Francisco. This is 1848, just in the nick of time to capitalize on the discovery of gold in Northern California. The details of where they are, what they see, what they purchase, what they eat, the way things just look is very thorough and interesting and seems very well researched. Although a relatively long book, it was hard for me to stop reading. A true, fun adventure.
dermeco
Kurt Andersen is a great writer, a skilled writer, a clever writer. His previous novel, Turn of the Century, was the perfect portrait of America during the late millennium (a/k/a, Y2K). With "Heyday," Andersen sets his goals higher. He has attempted to write a grandiose historical novel, a novel that would surpass all the efforts of E. L. Doctorow and Gore Vidal, a masterpiece that would be placed on some silly list of great books.

Alas, it's my sad duty to report that "Heyday" is not a great book. It lacks all the qualities that made Turn of the Century so entertaining. Gone are the fast pacing, surprises and wit. Parts of it are drudgery to slog through, mostly due to the surfeit of historical information and the thinness of the story. It is 1848; boy meets girl; they and their friends make a desultory journey to California where they discover gold and become rich. Borrowed from Les misérables there is also an Inspector Javert character relentlessly pursuing them. For much of the novel, the story advances at a glacial pace, and the protagonist, Benjamin Knowles, is as hollow as a jug. His family of stereotypical British upper-class twits is straight out of Noël Coward.

I enjoy reading history -- not the political history taught in school, but social history and the history of technology-- and I'm impressed by the staggering amount of research that has gone into this novel. Prior to reading "Heyday," I read a history of illumination, and Andersen gets all the details of lights and matches ("lucifers") correct. As is typical of historical novels, many famous people make an appearance -- Charles Darwin, Allan Pinkerton, Walt Whitman, Alexis de Tocqueville, et al. -- and I learned the startling fact that the Big Bang theory of the cosmos was presaged by none other than Edgar Allan Poe!

I'm also interested in the now-forgotten Mexican War of 1846-1848 and the barbarous "Siege of Veracruz" (see my slideshow of that title at Y.T.), and I learned much about that conflict here. I'd recommend the book for that reason alone, but somehow parts of it are like reading a stack of old National Geographics (without the photos).

Actually, it's not all *that* bad, and if you've attempted to read "Heyday" but set it aside, let me encourage you to give it another go, because the story gradually improves (except for the groaner of an ending) as it progresses. If only Andersen had made another draft, revised it and taken out all the chaff such as the pointless puppy-in-the-bucket episode (was that supposed to be some sort of dopey allegory?) or when the lovers get drenched with manure. In much of the book Andersen tries too hard to be salacious. If only his editors had sent him home with instructions to practice on the Delete key. To use the novel's 19th-century American patois, it's fair-to-middlin', tolerable, purdy-good, but it will not be one of your favorites.

One historical fact that Andersen does get wrong is that every time music or musicians are mentioned in the story, he always has them playing a trumpet. Trumpets were not a common instrument at that time, because they had no valves and could thus play only a limited number of pitches. Instead of trumpets, the military bands in New York all played valved saxhorns (cornets, alto horns, baritone horns, &c.) introduced there by Allen Dodworth in the late 1830s. Prior to saxhorns, bands used keyed bugles and ophicleides. Andersen confuses *saxhorns* (which don't use a reed) with *saxophones* (pg.17), and bands used neither trumpets nor saxophones until the next century.
Vareyma
This is one of the broad scope of 19th century history stories coloring the lives of the family and friends who make up the main characters of the book. It is not really historical fiction, but more in the line of one of the John Jakes type of novel where the characters are witnesses to the birth of modern times rather than the agents of the historical events.

This is an enjoyable tale, but not a book with a definable plot. It would be a great book to make into one of those television mini-series with a "Winning of the West" type of theme. In this story, you follow the adventures of the main characters through a period of not much more than a couple of years when the world was changing. This book takes you from one of the many revolutions (or maybe just revolts) in France through an enlightenment period in England and the growing pains of a growing immigrant population in New York City to the gold fields of California.

There are some spots in the book where the story was somewhat stretched to bring the main characters into contact with famous people or historical events. It is hard for me to fathom that four diverse people at that time in history would be personally acquainted with Abraham Lincoln, Charles Dickens, Walt Whitman, Alexis de Tocqueville and John C. Fremont. The four characters consist of the son of a wealthy, titled peer in England, an often fired reporter in New York, an "actress" and her obsessively religious, Mexican War veteran brother. I was sort of expecting the last page of the book would close with "And they lived happily ever after" since there was no real ending to the book,