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e-Book Salmon Fishing in the Yemen epub download

e-Book Salmon Fishing in the Yemen epub download

Author: Paul Torday
ISBN: 0151012768
Pages: 352 pages
Publisher: Harcourt; 1 edition (April 2, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Size ePUB: 1582 kb
Size Fb2: 1493 kb
Size DJVU: 1657 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 660
Format: docx lit lrf azw
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Salmon Fishing in the Yemen epub download

by Paul Torday



As you might guess, what Paul Torday appears to know best are salmon fishing and the Middle East, and . A novel full of whimsy and delight, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a must-read for every fisheries biologist who also happens to be an Arabist.

As you might guess, what Paul Torday appears to know best are salmon fishing and the Middle East, and the resulting novel is the unique expression of a genuine talent. Paul Torday fills his book with intriguing information, both on the nature of salmon recruitment and ideal oxygen levels, and daily cultural life in the Yemen, like references to the untouchable Yemeni class of the Akhdam. And it is a very rare book indeed that even acknowledges that they exist.

The origins of the Yemen Salmon Project

The origins of the Yemen Salmon Project. Fitzharris & Price. We enjoy reading as long as the books are improving or informative, and occasionally go to the theatre or to art exhibitions. And I fish, an unreconstructed activity of which Mary disapproves. It only takes something like this Yemen salmon project to raise its head to remind me that I have a dislike of the irrational, the unpredictable and the unknown.

But Paul Torday has managed to do so, brilliantly, producing a satirical treatment of British politics that is alternately affecting and screamingly funny. Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is the first of British author Paul Torday’s six novels to date

But Paul Torday has managed to do so, brilliantly, producing a satirical treatment of British politics that is alternately affecting and screamingly funny. Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is the first of British author Paul Torday’s six novels to date. Written when he was 59 years old at the end of a successful business careeer, the book reportedly allowed him to write about what he knows best (as every teacher urges in Creative Writing 101).

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. This is the story of Dr Alfred Jones, a fisheries scientist-for whom diary notable events include the acquisition of a new electric toothbrush and getting his article on caddis fly larvae published in ‘Trout and Salmon’-who finds himself reluctantly involved in a project to bring salmon fishing to the Highlands of the Yeme. project that will change his life, and. the course of British political history forever.

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a debut comedy novel written by Paul Torday and published in 2007. Torday was 59 when the book was published

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a debut comedy novel written by Paul Torday and published in 2007. Torday was 59 when the book was published. It is based on his extensive experiences of industry and government, as well as his personal interests in salmon fishing and the Middle East. Satirical themes in the novel focus on the 2000s Labour government of Tony Blair and its foreign policy dilemmas.

I reminded her that we had booked in weeks ago for a weekend’s walking and birdwatching with my brother in the . I thought about salmon spawning in the highlands of the Yemen

I reminded her that we had booked in weeks ago for a weekend’s walking and birdwatching with my brother in the Lake District. I thought about salmon spawning in the highlands of the Yemen. Round and round my head went these thoughts, chasing each other like salmon parr wriggling in the shimmering water of a stream. I got out of bed and came next door.

Paul Torday, the British businessman turned author who enjoyed success with comic bestseller Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, has died at the age of 67. His death was announced by publisher Weidenfeld and Nicolson, who said he died on Wednesday in Northumberland. Salmon Fishing sold more than 500,000 copies in the UK and won the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize in 2007. It went on to be filmed in 2011. His most recent novel, Light Shining in the Forest, was published this year

At the centre of Paul Torday's debut novel is an unlikely hero, Dr Alfred Jones, a humble civil . His book turns out to be a moral tale about the importance of believing in something, and the comparative unimportance of everything else

At the centre of Paul Torday's debut novel is an unlikely hero, Dr Alfred Jones, a humble civil servant at the National Centre for Fisheries Excellence. His book turns out to be a moral tale about the importance of believing in something, and the comparative unimportance of everything else. Fishermen will love it. Non-fishing readers will find it enjoyable, faintly moth-eaten and oddly thought-provoking. Independent culture newsletter.

Salmon fishing in the Yemen/Paul Torday. ed. p. cm. 1. Salmon fishing-Fiction. THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED TO MY WIFE Penelope, WHO CAN CATCH SALMON IN BRIGHT SUNLIGHT AND AT LOW WATER, TO the friends I FISH WITH ON THE TYNE AND THE TAY, AND TO THE men and women of the Environment Agency, WITHOUT WHOM THERE WOULD BE FAR FEWER FISH IN OUR RIVERS.

Dr. Alfred Jones is a henpecked, slightly pompous middle-aged scientist at the National Centre for Fisheries Excellence in London when he is approached by a mysterious sheikh about an outlandish plan to introduce the sport of salmon fishing into the Yemen. Dr. Jones refuses, but the project, however scientifically absurd, catches the eye of British politicians, who pressure him to work on it. His diaries of the Yemen Salmon Project, from beginning to glorious, tragic end, form the narrative backbone of this novel; interspersed throughout are government memos, e-mails, letters, and interview transcripts that deftly capture the absurdity of bureaucratic dysfunction. With a wickedly wonderful cast of characters—including a weasel-like spin doctor, a missing soldier and his intrepid fiancée, and Dr. Jones’s own devilish wife—Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is the whimsical story of an unlikely hero who discovers true love, finds himself first a pawn and then a victim of political spin, and learns to believe in the impossible.
Carrot
Very interesting and off-the-wall book. The story is written strictly through use of excerpts from reports, emails, journals, articles, and meeting minutes. A very rich sheikh in Yemen has developed a love for salmon fishing, and sets out to fulfill his dream of having salmon living, breeding, and running in his country. He enlists the aid of the United Kingdom, especially the services of Dr. Alfred Jones, an expert in fishery science. Everyone agrees the sheikh is crazy if he thinks he can get salmon to live in the arid Yemen, but since he intends to throw huge amounts of money into the project, the team works hard to see if it could actually be done. This is a satire of government, the media, politics, and Western culture in general. I read that there had been a movie made, but I didn't see it. Entertaining read.
Burirus
You know this, right? Yemen, previously called "The Yemen," lies on the fringe of the Arabian Peninsula as is best known today as a world-class producer of sand, desert heat, and political violence. Salmon are, of course, cold-water fish that are challenging to catch with a rod and reel but taste all the better once caught. So, we're on the same page, yes?

Now consider the chances of finding a novel that adroitly mixes not just Yemen and salmon fishing but also the British Parliament, Al Qaeda, a mystical sheikh, the art of public relations, a sad love story, and a journey of self-discovery. Before I read this book, I would have defied anyone to accomplish that seemingly impossible task. But Paul Torday has managed to do so, brilliantly, producing a satirical treatment of British politics that is alternately affecting and screamingly funny.

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is the first of British author Paul Torday's six novels to date. Written when he was 59 years old at the end of a successful business careeer, the book reportedly allowed him to write about what he knows best (as every teacher urges in Creative Writing 101). As you might guess, what Paul Torday appears to know best are salmon fishing and the Middle East, and the resulting novel is the unique expression of a genuine talent.

(From [...])
Ielonere
I'd heard of this book but never really considered buying it until Amazon offered it for $1.99. Once I got around to reading it yesterday afternoon, I had to make myself stop in order to get to the theatre on time. Then I started back this morning and had to stop again because of other commitments. I came here before getting back to finish up the book in order to see when it was published and read the reviews. I'm rather surprised at some of the mediocre reviews. I don't normally write reviews -- and you can see why -- but I really am enjoying this book. I think Paul Torday captures "Prime Minister's Questions" very well. It's so different from our Congress in the US. Hilarious, in fact.

I find the main characters likable. Mary, Fred's wife, is a bit unbelievable -- is anyone really THAT cold and stiff? Oh yeah, she's British. But even so...

Maybe it's because I'm reading this after a book of Alice Munro's short stories (that left me feeling a bit depressed) that I'm enjoying it so much, but I AM enjoying it.

Gotta get back to it and if I change my mind in the next hour or so, I'll amend my review. : )
Thetalas
A novel full of whimsy and delight, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a must-read for every fisheries biologist who also happens to be an Arabist. Paul Torday fills his book with intriguing information, both on the nature of salmon recruitment and ideal oxygen levels, and daily cultural life in the Yemen, like references to the untouchable Yemeni class of the Akhdam. (And it is a very rare book indeed that even acknowledges that they exist.) I read this book while I was traveling through Yemen, and was enthralled with the accurate references to life I saw around me.

But the novel is engaging purely on the story level. Torday has an ingenious method of getting the reader's attention through a serious of progressively revealing emails, and then you are full bore into the lives of the protagonists, anxious to find out what happens next to Dr. Alfred Jones. Torday continues the correspondence method, but you don't feel like you're reading letters, press releases, and inquisitions; you forget as you listen to the play-by-play conversations and developing emotions. And though there is romance here, it doesn't develop at all as one might expect- nor, at the end, is the true romance with whom you expected.

And for those who are interested, Torday has something to teach as well- in a purely non-overbearing manner. There is religion, and there is spirituality, and not always are the two divided. There is a knowledge of God, and the knowledge of one's Lord that comes from intimacy. And contrary to what we often here in stereotypes of the world's religions, that intimacy can show up in some of the most surprising places.

I have no reservations in declaring this the finest Yemen fish novel I've ever read. (And that actually says something- I found it slightly better than the other great Yemeni marine biology work, Pirates, Bats, And Dragons: A Science Adventure (Science Adventures).) If you love the Middle East and you love fishes, you will love this book.