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e-Book The Queen's Lover: A Novel epub download

e-Book The Queen's Lover: A Novel epub download

Author: Francine Du Plessix Gray
ISBN: 1594203377
Pages: 304 pages
Publisher: Penguin Press; First Edition, 1st Printing edition (June 14, 2012)
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Size ePUB: 1791 kb
Size Fb2: 1637 kb
Size DJVU: 1248 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 529
Format: lrf mobi mbr azw
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book The Queen's Lover: A Novel epub download

by Francine Du Plessix Gray



This is one of those books where you’ll learn – or relearn – history effortlessly, as du Plessix Gray spins the affair of Marie Antoinette and a Swedish count into riveting drama.

This is one of those books where you’ll learn – or relearn – history effortlessly, as du Plessix Gray spins the affair of Marie Antoinette and a Swedish count into riveting drama. Entertainment Weekly.

THE QUEEN’S LOVER ALSO BY FRANCINE DU PLESSIX GRAY Madame de Staël: The First Modern Woman Them: A Memoir of Parents Simone Weil At Home with . Also by francine du plessix gray.

THE QUEEN’S LOVER ALSO BY FRANCINE DU PLESSIX GRAY Madame de Staël: The First Modern Woman Them: A Memoir of Parents Simone Weil At Home with the Marquis de Sade: A Life. Madame de Staël: The First Modern Woman. Them: A Memoir of Parents.

Francine du Plessix Gray has previously written distinguished works of fiction and . In this instance, it’s relatively easy.

Francine du Plessix Gray has previously written distinguished works of fiction and nonfiction, most recently a biography, Madame de Stael: The First Modern Woman. Now turning her attention to the Swedish aristocrat Count Axel von Fersen the Younger (1755-1810), she has chosen to present him in a novel centered on his alleged affair with Marie Antoinette. Transposing these essentially biographical objectives into a novel allows for imaginative license with regard to the first and selective attention to the second. Gray has written a hybrid book - part history, part fiction - rather than a well-­integrated historical novel.

Francine du Plessix Gray (September 25, 1930 – January 13, 2019), was a French-born American Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer and literary critic

Francine du Plessix Gray (September 25, 1930 – January 13, 2019), was a French-born American Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer and literary critic. She was born on September 25, 1930, in Warsaw, Poland, where her father, Vicomte Bertrand Jochaud du Plessix, was a French diplomat – the commercial attaché

The Queen's Lover book. Francine du Plessix Gray's beautifully realized historical novel reveals the untold love story between Swedish aristocrat Count Axel von Fersen and Marie Antoinette

The Queen's Lover book. Francine du Plessix Gray's beautifully realized historical novel reveals the untold love story between Swedish aristocrat Count Axel von Fersen and Marie Antoinette. The romance begins at a masquerade ball in Paris in 1774, when the A "deeply intelligent" and "spellbinding" historical novel of Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French Revolution (The Washington Post).

The Queen's Lover begins at a masquerade ball in Paris in 1774, when the . The life story of Marie Antoinette fascinates many a lover of historical fiction.

The Queen's Lover begins at a masquerade ball in Paris in 1774, when the dashing Swedish nobleman Count Axel Von Fersen first meets the mesmerizing nineteen-year old Dauphine Marie Antoinette, wife of the shy, reclusive prince who will soon become Louis XV. Sophie’s few chapters allow author Francine Du Plessix Gray to convey information Fersen himself couldn’t or wouldn’t, his own death at the hands of an anti-aristocratic mob for instance, but most of the story is Fersen’s bittersweet memories many years after the events surrounding the French Revolution.

Receive free books with BookBrowse First Impressions & the BookBrowse Book Club. Added to the collection July. The Queen's Lover: A Novel. Bookbrowse recommendation - release date". The Queen's Lover: A NovelHardcover. The Hardcover of the The Queen's Lover: A Novel by Francine Du Plessix Gray at Barnes & Noble.

The Queen& Lover Du Plessix Gray Francine Неизвестно 9780143123569 : A spellbinding and deeply intelligent historical novel about Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French . The Queen& Lover, Du Plessix Gray Francine. Варианты приобретения.

The Queen& Lover Du Plessix Gray Francine Неизвестно 9780143123569 : A spellbinding and deeply intelligent historical novel about Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French Revolution ( . Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

The Queen’s Lover is very well written and paints a detailed picture of events that have been shoddily addressed by other authors.

by Francine du Plessix Gray. The Queen’s Lover is very well written and paints a detailed picture of events that have been shoddily addressed by other authors. I came away with a much better understanding of the political climate surrounding the French Revolution. Francine du Plessix Gray has been a regular contributor to The New Yorker and is the author of numerous books of fiction and nonfiction, including Simone Weil, At Home with the Marquis de Sade: A Life, Rage and Fire, Lovers and Tyrants, and Soviet Women. She is most recently the author of the memoir Them: A Memoir of Parents.

Read online books written by Francine Du Plessix Gray in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Francine Du Plessix Gray: The Queen's Lover. Author of The Queen's Lover at ReadAnyBook.

A “deeply intelligent” and “spellbinding” historical novel of Marie Antoinette on the eve of the French Revolution (The Washington Post)Francine du Plessix Gray’s beautifully realized historical novel reveals the untold love story between Swedish aristocrat Count Axel von Fersen and Marie Antoinette. The romance begins at a masquerade ball in Paris in 1774, when the dashing nobleman first meets the mesmerizing nineteen-year-old dauphine, wife of the reclusive prince who will soon become Louis XVI. This electric encounter launches a love affair that will span the course of the French Revolution.As their relationship deepens, Fersen becomes a devoted companion to the entire royal family. Roaming the halls of Versailles and visiting the private haven of Le Petit Trianon, he discovers the deepest secrets of the court, even learning the startling erotic details of Marie Antoinette’s marriage to Louis XVI. But his new intimacy with Marie Antoinette and her family is disrupted when the events of the American Revolution tear Fersen away. Moved by the cause, he joins French troops in the fight for American independence.He returns to find France on the brink of disintegration. After the Revolution of 1789 the royal family is moved from Versailles to the Tuileries. Fersen devises an escape for the family and their young children (Marie-Thérèse and the dauphin—whom many suspect is in fact Fersen’s son). The failed attempt leads to a more grueling imprisonment, and the family spends its excruciating final days captive before the king and queen face the guillotine.Grieving his lost love in his native Sweden, Fersen begins to sense the effects of the French Revolution in his homeland. Royalists are now targets, and the sensuous aristocratic world of his youth is fast vanishing. Fersen is incapable of realizing that centuries of tradition have disappeared, and he pays dearly for his naïveté, losing his life at the hands of a savage mob that views him as a pivotal member of the ruling class.Scion of Sweden’s most esteemed nobility, Fersen came to be seen as an enemy of the country he loved. His fate is symbolic of the violent speed with which the events of the eighteenth century transformed European culture. Expertly researched and deeply imagined, The Queen’s Lover is a fresh vision of the French Revolution and the French royal family as told through the love story that was at its center.
Watikalate
THE QUEEN’S LOVER is a historical fiction, which, happily for this reader, appears to go beyond fiction and into history. Through the author’s extensive research, the reader is given insight into the life of a man we knew little about until this writing. The letters of Axel von Fersen show us a sensual man of action, living in revolutionary times. The picture drawn of him is frank, but with all his blemishes, there are also acts of self-sacrifice, obligation and duty that propel him onward into turbulent situations that eventually force his being acted upon, rather than acting.

Because of the kind of man he is, how can his life follow any other course but that of intrigue and adventure? Francine du Plessix Gray does great service to the reader when refusing to withhold from Fersen’s character his thoughts, feelings and words. Her research enables her to inform readers of Fersen's mindset, temperament and innermost feelings without hiding behind the childish conventions of stuffy puritanism that would otherwise conceal him from us.

History, including historical fiction, need not be sanitized for today’s sophisticated readers, who have certainly been around the block more than once. History is about men and women doing things, period. The children’s section might better serve puritanical tastes. A reader of history or historical fiction reads for a sense of “how it was,” rather than “how he wishes it was”. Most read history (including historical fiction) to acquaint themselves with the period and actors on the stage of life’s events. This book offers that and more. Here we have the personality of those actors and how they react as seen through their actual letters and diary entries.

As I finished reading this book, I realized that I didn’t want it end. I now see that I share something with those puritanical readers – I wanted the book to continue on to a happy ending. This feeling is new to me because I do not become attached to historical personalities. I suspect that it has something to do with the desperate state of affairs of the period and of a man trying to act for good, while finding every route blocked except one, which had to be taken.

My compliments to Francine du Plessix Gray for a compelling, and at times, white-knuckle insider view of a man caught in the middle of the French Revolution.
INwhite
I have studied the life of Marie Antoinette and, as a sideline, come to know a fair amount about Axel Fersen. But I really wanted to know more about him. So I grabbed this book up eagerly, and sat down for what I hoped would be a great read.

Alas, I was SOO wrong. The book calls itself a novel, but does very little in the way of making the story interesting. Frankly, it's mostly a rehash of many of the facts you can get from other non-fiction books, with very little in the way of imagination thrown in. She tells us the facts, but no heart, no understanding of why this was a great love affair.

An example: Fersen declares that Marie Antoinette is the One, the beloved; yet he has sex with the wife of one of his friends on a regular basis, in fact going from an assignation with Marie straight to this other woman's bed. This is fact; it happened. But why? How can a man who considers himself in love with one woman jump from her bed to another's? It's jarring (and it always has been for me). So I hoped the author would make it more understandable, have some insight. Nope. She basically has Fersen say, "Yes, I'm a cad, I like sex, so there you have it." That's a cop-out; surely the author of a novel could come up with something better.

If this were touted as a non-fiction account of Fersen's life, I would accept that. But it's a novel. There are no insights, no new slants, nothing to make you want to find out more about this man and his great love. It was a tremendous disappointment.
RUsich155
This book was extremely disappointing in so many respects. Yes, portions of the book concern the relationship between Fersen and Marie Antoinette. Those portions of the book are the most interesting, but they comprise only a part of the book. As a result, both the title and the cover art strike me as misleading (hence my question as to false advertising).

In fact, the book is primarily about the life and political and other proclivities of Fersen, but despite what appears to have been a most interesting life, he comes across as an insufferable, priggish bore who was terribly impressed with himself, his virtue, his political savvy, his great achievements, his sexual appetites and abilities, and so on. The portions that come from his sister's diaries don't help in this respect; she comes across a bit better (i.e., more human) than her brother, but she's so much in awe of him that she cannot provide any interesting perspectives either.

I found some other things in the book rather odd. First and foremost, the book couldn't decide if it was fact or fiction, and ended up including the less "attractive" aspects of both. I also found it odd that Ms. Du Plessix Gray included some sexually explicit/anatomical discussions. I almost wonder if she felt it necessary to titillate what was otherwise a "bald and unconvincing narrative" (I hope I got that quote right).

All in all, not very impressive. I gave it three stars, but I was probably too kind.