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e-Book Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) epub download

e-Book Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) epub download

Author: Christine Levecq
ISBN: 1584657340
Pages: 324 pages
Publisher: New Hampshire (December 31, 2008)
Language: English
Category: History & Criticism
Size ePUB: 1197 kb
Size Fb2: 1144 kb
Size DJVU: 1687 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 381
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Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) epub download

by Christine Levecq



Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850. Release Date: December 2008. Publisher: University of New Hampshire Press.

Slavery and Sentiment : The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850. This book argues that expressions of feeling in those texts did not just appeal to individual readers inclinations to sympathy but rather were inherently political. The authors of these texts made arguments from the social and political ideologies that grounded their moral and social lives.

Slavery and Sentiment book Published December 31st 2008 by University of New Hampshire Press (first published January 1st 2008).

Slavery and Sentiment book. This book argues that expressions of feeling in those texts did not just appeal to individual readers' inclinations to sympathy but rather were inherently political. The authors of these texts made arguments from the social From the eighteenth century on, appeals to listeners' and readers' feelings about the sufferings of slaves were a predominant strategy of abolitionism. Published December 31st 2008 by University of New Hampshire Press (first published January 1st 2008).

This book argues that expressions of feeling in those texts did not just appeal to individual readers’ inclinations .

This book argues that expressions of feeling in those texts did not just appeal to individual readers’ inclinations to sympathy but rather were inherently political. Levecq examines liberalism and republicanism, the main Anglo-American political ideologies of the period, in the antislavery texts of a range of African-American and Afro-British authors. Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770-1850 Becoming modern : new nineteenth-century studies Becoming modern.

Series: Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies

Published by: University of New Hampshire Press. Series: Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies.

Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies. Empire and Slavery in American Literature, 1820-1865. by: Sundquist, Eric J. Published: (2006). Subjects: American literature African American authors History and criticism. American literature 19th century History and criticism. Didactic fiction, American History and criticism. Slavery in literature. African Americans Intellectual life 19th century. Literature and society United States History 19th century. Antislavery movements in literature. The African American Roots of Modernism : From Reconstruction to the Harlem Renaissance. by: Smethurst, James.

This book sets out to make vivid certain telling moments of interconnection .

This book sets out to make vivid certain telling moments of interconnection among a variety of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century phenomena that might be assumed to have inhabited separate cultural spaces: seduction plots, sentimental narratives, and the economic, social, credal, and ideological imperatives of what has become known as the Atlantic world. Its success in the 1770s was due to its capacity to move and affect deeply, drawing the reader into a culture of tears. As contemporary opinions testify, crying over The Man of Feeling was the test of the sensibility of its early readers.

Christine Levecq, Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770–1850. Durham: University of New Hampshire Press, 2008. Sergio Lussana, "Christine Levecq, Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770–1850," The Journal of African American History 95, no. 3-4 (Summer-Fall 2010): 433-435. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

University Press of New England, University of New Hampshire Press. Becoming modern : new nineteenth-century studies. Open eBook in new window.

McKivigan, John R. The Frederick Douglass–Gerrit Smith Friendship and Political Abolitionism in the 1850s.

Slavery and Sentiment: The Politics of Feeling in Black Atlantic Antislavery Writing, 1770–1850. Levine, Robert S. Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. McKivigan, John R. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. Miller, Keith . and Kevin Quashie.

From the eighteenth century on, appeals to listeners’ and readers’ feelings about the sufferings of slaves were a predominant strategy of abolitionism. This book argues that expressions of feeling in those texts did not just appeal to individual readers’ inclinations to sympathy but rather were inherently political. The authors of these texts made arguments from the social and political ideologies that grounded their moral and social lives. Levecq examines liberalism and republicanism, the main Anglo-American political ideologies of the period, in the antislavery texts of a range of African-American and Afro-British authors. Disclosing the political content hitherto unexamined in this kind of writing, she shows that while the overall story is one of increased liberalization of ideology on both sides of the Atlantic, the republican ideal persisted, particularly among black authors with transatlantic connections.Demonstrating that such writers as Phillis Wheatley, Ignatius Sancho, Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Mary Prince were men and women of their times, Levecq provides valuable new insight into the ideological world of black Atlantic writers and puts them, for the first time, on modernity’s political map.