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e-Book Annotations To Finnegans Wake epub download

e-Book Annotations To Finnegans Wake epub download

Author: Roland McHugh
ISBN: 0710006616
Pages: 640 pages
Publisher: Routledge & Kegan Paul; 1st U. K. edition (1980)
Language: English
Category: History & Criticism
Size ePUB: 1592 kb
Size Fb2: 1218 kb
Size DJVU: 1184 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 414
Format: lit lrf lrf txt
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Annotations To Finnegans Wake epub download

by Roland McHugh



Roland McHugh is an admirable Joyce scholar and most certainly knows more about the Wake than I, but I must say this book is not at all what I was looking for in an annotated guide

Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Roland McHugh is an admirable Joyce scholar and most certainly knows more about the Wake than I, but I must say this book is not at all what I was looking for in an annotated guide. I was expecting the format of Ulysses Annotated, but instead was confronted with a very different mode of operation. McHugh's book is very useful in two areas, those being . Foreign Words and . Joyce's compound words.

Annotations to Finnegans Wake book. Long considered the essential guide to Joyce's famously difficult work, Roland McHugh's Annotations to "Finnegans Wake" provides both novice readers and seasoned Joyceans with a wealth of information in an easy-to-use format uniquely suited to this densely layered text.

McHugh's Annotations explicates foreign words, English overtones, place . Annotations to Finnegans wake Johns Hopkins Paperback.

McHugh's Annotations explicates foreign words, English overtones, place names, personal names, phrases parodied, song titles and quotations, literary sources, historical events, and more. Most notable is the arrangement of the book: each page corresponds, line by line, and word-placement by work-placement, with a page of Finnegans Wake.

Some books are born annotated, some achieve annotation, and some have annotation thrust upon 'em. Ever the exception for itself making no exceptions, Finnegans Wake falls into each of these categories

Some books are born annotated, some achieve annotation, and some have annotation thrust upon 'em. Ever the exception for itself making no exceptions, Finnegans Wake falls into each of these categories. For his part, Roland McHugh recommends "mentally superimposing" his annotations when reading the Wake (xii), though my optometrist might not approve of that. Actually, McHugh says that this is what. the reader "must now do" (xiii).

Long considered the essential guide to Joyce's famously difficult work, Roland McHugh's Annotations to Finnegans Wake .

Long considered the essential guide to Joyce's famously difficult work, Roland McHugh's Annotations to Finnegans Wake provides both novice readers and seasoned. Now extensively revised, expanded, and corrected, Roland McHugh's "Annotations" is a unique one-volume guidebook designed to be read side by side with the "Wake" itself.

Roland McHugh’s classic Annotations to Finnegans Wake provides both novice readers and seasoned Joyceans with a wealth of information in an easy-to-use format uniquely suited to this densely layered text.

Roland McHugh has been studying Finnegans Wake since 1965. In 1973 he moved to Dublin with a view to understanding the book more completely and has lived there ever since. His book, The Sigla of "Finnegans Wake," was described by Clive Hart as "the best book on Finnegans Wake yet written.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Annotations to Finnegans Wake by Roland McHugh .

Now extensively revised, expanded, and corrected, Roland McHughs "Annotations" is a unique one-volume guidebook designed to be read side by side with the "Wake" itself. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

RuTGamer
Before you purchase this book, check 'LOOK INSIDE' to see *all* the pages above the book visual. The first few appear ok, however, after 8 or 10 you will find it is a messy presentation, in size 9 or 10 pt font at the very most, and the print is blurry also. I took one look at a few pages and knew I could not read without a magnifying glass. I have other books in 10pt font on good paper, with clear print that I have no problem reading. This one appears to be a copy of a copy. Someone must be raking in a profit on this at $37.00. Shame on the publisher.
Samut
(1) Content: I can see how it would easy to be deceived by what McHugh's is, and what it offers, because of the broadness of use of the word _annotations_. As said in other comments, McHughs is not explanatory of the Wake in the sense that it offers explanation of the narrative or narrative content. Rather, its purpose is almost entirely to (1) point out textural references; (2) offer translations; and (3) suggest possible puns/readings of words and phrases. While McHugh's is of incredible help understanding parts of the Wake (for example, being able to trace the cheese and butter references in the Burrous and Casseous episode is of great help to parsing it), for other parts it offers almost no aid to understanding the text at the basic level of "what's going on." Thus, while it will not give you an explanation (in the sense of a Cliff's Notes) of the Wake, it is yet be of great use. I myself always have it open when I am reading or working with the Wake. If you have the money, it is worth the purchase.

(2) Editions: It seems to me that the primary difference between the second and third edition is typesetting: the text is smaller, permitting more flexibility in how it is arranged on the page (something that makes sense only if you are familiar with how McHugh's works). There are some new notes added, though in proportion it is a small amount. You can go through a number of pages without finding something new. As such, if you already have the second edition, I don't believe the third edition is a necessary purchase. And, if you are trying out the waters for the first time, you are not losing much by picking up a used second edition. (Also, the second edition is printed on heavy stock; in comparison the third edition feels fragile.) (I do not know for the first edition.)
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
Roland McHugh is an admirable Joyce scholar and most certainly knows more about the Wake than I, but I must say this book is not at all what I was looking for in an annotated guide. I was expecting the format of Ulysses Annotated, but instead was confronted with a very different mode of operation. McHugh's book is very useful in two areas, those being 1.)Foreign Words and 2.)Joyce's compound words. This is because the author presents the annotations as if they were personal notes in his own copy of the Wake, rather than full explications as found in Ulysses Annotated. McHugh argues that this will force the reader to make his own connections and lead to more frutiful conclusions, but the same goal could be accomplished by simply doing what McHugh has done, read FW, study it, and make notes of your own. Any beginner who is not familiar with some of the primary themes of the Wake will be sorely disappointed. The best example of the way McHugh skims over these is found in the preface (which I believe can be previewed on this site), where he shows how in a regular annotated guide a reference to Giambattista Vico would take up 9 lines of text, briefly explaining his theory, and in his own method it is simply referred to as 'Vico'. This reference would mean absolutely nothing to a reader unfamiliar with Vico. For a reader seeking to add a little convenience to their own personal study, this is perfect. For the reader seeking (relatively) full explanations of historical and literary allusions and such, this is most certainly not the guide to get. This book would have been exponentially more useful had it simply been integrated into the text of FW, ie one page of FW, one page of annotations.
Mr_TrOlOlO
This is a very well-researched and quite complete set of annotations, and along with various guidebooks (Tyndall, Campbell), this is an essential reference which I keep open while pushing through The Wake. I like the way it is organized to match the original printing of the book, to avoid the need for footnotes -- every reference is right in place!
Downloaded
so many things he misses, so much obvious stuff he includes, and so little detail on the meaning of some of the annotations end up making this book somewhat of a nuisance, breaking up the flow which makes the Wake enjoyable. I still prefer Joseph Campbell's Skeleton Key to FW, though it admits that it does not try to catch every allusion. I find that most of the things that I really do want to find out, where I hear some echo of something, he doesn't touch on, or doesn't touch on to my satisfaction. Really, this project should be a collaboration online where people would add their comments to the possible meanings of different lines, because there are so many. Each man comes at it with his own knowledge, interests and needs, and can't get everything. So while this is useful for some, it's more of an impediment for me. A tattered security blanket that trips you up while you walk, you feel like Linus from peanuts lugging out this big blue thing.
Truthcliff
an indispensable aid to reading Finnegans Wake
Went Tyu
You can read the wake and with this "guide" it can be joyous. Take a deep breath and dive in.
More research would have let me know that this doesn't include the actual FW text, you have to keep both books open. Probably couldn't include the text due to copyright issues. But there is plenty of room to add your own notes. I'm glad I bought it, just would have preferred the ability to read the text in the same book.