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e-Book Lyco of Troas and Hieronymus of Rhodes: Text, Translation, and Discussion (Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities) epub download

e-Book Lyco of Troas and Hieronymus of Rhodes: Text, Translation, and Discussion (Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities) epub download

Author: William W. Fortenbaugh,Stephen A. White
ISBN: 0765802538
Pages: 470 pages
Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (May 1, 2004)
Language: English
Category: History & Criticism
Size ePUB: 1378 kb
Size Fb2: 1724 kb
Size DJVU: 1245 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Lyco of Troas and Hieronymus of Rhodes: Text, Translation, and Discussion (Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities) epub download

by William W. Fortenbaugh,Stephen A. White



He founded the Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities (RUSCH) series and is the current series . Lyco of Troas(c. 300-c. 225 BC., was the third head of the Peripatos after Aristotle. Head of the Lyceum after Strato, whose will designated him successor.

Lyco of Troas(c. Wealthy and worldly, Lyco was a popular teacher, attracted major benefactions, and directed the school for forty-four years.

Lyco of Troas was the third head of the Peripatos after Aristotle. Hieronymus of Rhodes was a member of the school and an antagonist of Lyco. Excellence in teaching wa Volume 12 in the RUSCH series continues work already begun on the School of Aristotle.

Hieronymus of Rhodes: The Sources, Text and. Translation. Stephen White 79-276. William W Fortenbaugh 411-441. 11. Hieronymus on Isocrates’ Style. David C. Mirhady 443-456. 3. The Life of Lyco and the Life of the Lyceum. Jorgen Mejer 277-287. 4. Hieronymus in Athens and Rhodes. Elisabetta Matelli 289-314. 5. Peripatetic Philosophers as Wandering Scholars: Some.

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Lyco of Troas, depicted as a medieval scholar in the Nuremberg Chronicle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lyco of Troas and Hieronymus of Rhodes: Text, Translation and Discussion. Lyco of Troas (/ˈlaɪkoʊ/; Greek: Λύκων Lykon, ge. Λύκωνος; c. 299 – c. 225 BC), son of Astyanax, was a Peripatetic philosopher and the disciple of Strato, whom he succeeded as the head of the Peripatetic school, c. 269 BC; he held that post for more than forty-four years. p. 53. ISBN 9780521250283. Laërtius, Diogenes (1925). Transaction Publishers. 10 White (Peter Lautner), Peripatetic Reactions to Hellenistic Epistemology (Hans Gottschalk), and Lyco and Hieronymus on the Good Life (Stephen White). Excellence in teaching was Lyco's distinguishing attribute, but he also attracted benefactors and had the reputation of being a bon vivant.

Fortenbaugh, William Wall; White, Stephen Augustus, eds. (2004). 15th-20th century book illustrations of "The Sun and the Wind online. Lyco and Traos and Hieronymus of Rhodes: Text, Translation, and Discussion. Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities. XII. Librivox Dialect and Accent Collection Vol. 1 - Audio samples of The North Wind and the Sun, from Internet Archive, recorded by LibriVox volunteers.

Ancient & Classical Literary Criticism Books. Lyco of Troas and Hieronymus of Rhodes : Text, Translation, and Discussion. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. Qty

William W. Fortenbaugh is professor emeritus of classics at Rutgers University. Stephen A. White is associate professor of classics at the University of Texas at Austin and author of Sovereign Virtue: Aristotle on.

William W. He is the author of Aristotle on Emotion and the founder of Project Theophrastus.

Volume 16 of Transaction’s acclaimed Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities series, continues the work of Project . He succeeded the latter in c. 286 BCE and was in turn succeeded by Lyco of Troas in c. 268.

Volume 16 of Transaction’s acclaimed Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities series, continues the work of Project Theophrastus on the School of Aristotle. The subject of this volume is Strato of Lampsacus in Mysia on the Hellespont. Strato was the third head of the Peripatetic School after Aristotle and Theophrastus. Diogenes Laertius describes Strato as a distinguished person who became known as "the physicist," because more than anyone else he devoted himself to the careful study of nature.

Volume 12 in the RUSCH series continues work already begun on the School of Aristotle. It focuses on two Peripatetic philosophers who lived in the third century BCE, when Stoicism and Epicureanism flourished. Lyco of Troas was the third head of the Peripatos after Aristotle. Hieronymus of Rhodes was a member of the school and an antagonist of Lyco.

Excellence in teaching was Lyco's distinguishing attribute, but he also attracted benefactors and had the reputation of being a bon vivant. Hieronymus is best known for his work on ethics, but he also wrote on literature, history, and rhetoric. Our understanding of the work being done in the Peripatos during the third century BCE will be greatly enhanced by Peter Stork's new edition of Lyco and Stephen White's edition of Hieronymus.

The two editions in this volume are accompanied by full translations as well as notes on the Greek and Latin texts (an apparatus criticus) and substantive notes that accompany the translation. The editions will replace those of Fritz Wehrli, which were made over half a century ago and published without an accompanying translation. In addition to the two editions, this volume includes ten essays that address significant themes presented by the texts. Three of the essays deal with biographical material: "Diogenes Life of Lyco" (J°rgen Mejer), "Hieronymus in Athens and Rhodes" (Elisabetta Matelli), and "Peripatetic Philosophers as Wandering Scholars" (Peter Scholz). Four develop philosophical topics: "Hieronymus of Rhodes on Vision" (Todd Ganson), "The Historical Setting of Hieronymus fr. 10 White" (Peter Lautner), "Peripatetic Reactions to Hellenistic Epistemology" (Hans Gottschalk), and "Lyco and Hieronymus on the Good Life" (Stephen White). Three concern rhetoric and literature: "Lyco Phrastikos" (William Fortenbaugh), "Hieronymus on Isocrates' Style" (David Mirhady), and "Hieronymus in Ancient Commentaries on Hesiod's Shield" (Andrea Martano).