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e-Book The Victorians (Hist of Literature) (v. 6) epub download

e-Book The Victorians (Hist of Literature) (v. 6) epub download

Author: Arthur Pollard
ISBN: 0140177566
Pages: 592 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books (February 1, 1994)
Language: English
Category: History & Criticism
Size ePUB: 1875 kb
Size Fb2: 1387 kb
Size DJVU: 1120 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 738
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Subcategory: Literature

e-Book The Victorians (Hist of Literature) (v. 6) epub download

by Arthur Pollard



Book in the The Penguin History of Literature Series). The Victorian age was one whose principal tenets were progress and individualism, and one characterized by Tennyson as an awful moment of transition.

Book in the The Penguin History of Literature Series). In this volume introductory essays on aspects of Victorian thought, faith and doubt lead into chapters on the major novelists and poets of the period, as well as pieces on women prose-writers, fantasy and nonsense, the Victorian theatre and the fin de siecle.

com's Arthur Pollard Page and shop for all Arthur Pollard books. The Victorians (Hist of Literature) (v. 6). Feb 1, 1994. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Arthur Pollard.

Victorian literature began with such humorous books as Sartor Resartus and The Pickwick Papers. Despite the crisis of faith, the Condition of England question, and the ache of modernism, this note was sustained throughout the century

Victorian literature began with such humorous books as Sartor Resartus and The Pickwick Papers. Despite the crisis of faith, the Condition of England question, and the ache of modernism, this note was sustained throughout the century.

Victorian literature is literature, mainly written in English, during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) (the Victorian era). It was preceded by Romanticism and followed by the Edwardian era (1901–1910)

Victorian literature is literature, mainly written in English, during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) (the Victorian era). It was preceded by Romanticism and followed by the Edwardian era (1901–1910). While in the preceding Romantic period, poetry had been the conquerors, novels were the emperors of the Victorian period. Charles Dickens (1812–1870) dominated the first part of Victoria's reign and most rightly can be called "The King of Victorian Literature".

The Victorians (Penguin History of Literature). 0140177566 (ISBN13: 9780140177565).

This volume of "The Penguin History of Literature" is devoted to its . The Victorians is a fine collection of critical-historical articles, opening with .

A first section considers present-day English, its sounds, grammar, vocabulary and stylistic varieties. Revised, and including current bibliographies, American Literature since 1900 contains 13 chapters written by noted critics and organized mainly by periods and genres, including that of literary criticism itself. Cockshut's clearly reasoned chapters on Victorian intellectual and religious movements and then proceeding through the English writers of the period and mostly thematic analyses of their works.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Arthur Pollard books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Letters of Elizabeth Gaskell. Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell.

The Cambridge Companions to Literature and Classics form a book series published by Cambridge University Press. Each book is a collection of essays on the topic commissioned by the publisher. Topics Theatre History by David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski African American Theatre by Harvey Young Piers Plowman by Andrew Cole and Andrew Galloway. Cambridge Companions.

The whole Victorian society showed great distinctiveness by national progress during this time. After the Crimean War, the English people got relieved of many concerns and lived through the mid-Victorian era with a good deal of peace

The whole Victorian society showed great distinctiveness by national progress during this time. After that, Briggs gives thought about John Arthur Roebuck and the Crimean War. The war was a creation of enormous nationalism. The Crimean War was popular with the masses, politicians, and the writers and poets of this time. After the Crimean War, the English people got relieved of many concerns and lived through the mid-Victorian era with a good deal of peace. The. writers during this time that described the fundamentals of life were Trollope and Bagehot.

Influence of Victorian era literature and poetry. Famous novelists and their works. As is quite evident from the title the kind of literature that evolved during the reign of Queen Victoria is famously known as the Victorian era literature. The literature of the Victorian age (1837-1901) entered a new period after the romantic revival. The literature of this era was preceded by romanticism and was followed by modernism or realism. Hence, it can also be called a fusion of romantic and realist style of writing. Though the Victorian Age produced two great poets Alfred Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning, the age is also remarkable for the excellence of its prose.

The Victorian age was one whose principal tenets were progress and individualism, and one characterized by Tennyson as "an awful moment of transition". In this volume introductory essays on aspects of Victorian thought, faith and doubt lead into chapters on the major novelists and poets of the period, as well as pieces on women prose-writers, fantasy and nonsense, the Victorian theatre and the "fin de siecle". "The Penguin History of Literature" is a critical survey of English and American literature in ten volumes. Each volume is a collection of original essays specially commissioned for the series, which, taken together, cover 14 centuries of literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.
Cordanara
As a committed contrarian and one who thought he had read enough about Victorian England to skip "The Victorians", I went directly to "After the Victorians" and having it enjoyed it tremendously, had to re-double and get back to the beginning, if you will. And it was worth it. As demonstrated by other reviews, it is somewhat difficult to categorize Wilson's approach to this ever-fascinating period. It's too opinionated to be "History" and too historical to be merely opinion. He calls each of these volumes a "portrait of an age", and I think that's close enough. As always, the important question is whether this or any other tome (and this IS a tome) justifies the time and effort necessary to digest it. To me, the answer is an unqualified yes. I believe what makes the book (and its successor) so enjoyable is Wilson's thorough command of his subject which in turn enables him to recount events and the lives and relationships of various personages with a sure, and frequently offbeat, hand. He knows what he's talking about and thus feels free to tell the story in his own way rather than as might be expected from a more traditional historian. And at least this reader thoroughly enjoyed "his own way".

And, by the way, if you're looking for a book on the everyday lives of the Victorians, try Judith Flanders' "Inside the Victorian Home"; terrifically well-told story by a marvelous writer.
IWantYou
The above title refers to the opening sentences of Chapter 27, in which Wilson proclaims: "It is difficult for me to conceive of any more agreeable way of life than that of the Victorian country parson. If I had to choose my ideal span of life, I should choose to have been born in the 1830s, the son of a parson with the genetic inheritance of strong teeth."---This sentiment should give the prospective reader an idea of what s/he is in for here: a lively, stylish, jaunty, highly personalized overview of the Victorian era, full of anecdote and personal association. It is certainly not a whitewash, though, as these sentences may lead one to believe, but nor is it in the debunking tone of Strachey either. It is....Wilsonian.

Some of these quirky associations will leave the reader nonplussed, as when Wilson posits, with no hint of irony, that mesmerism was a precursor to Joyce and Proust. But this is Wilson's book. Let him have his fun. I certainly did, in the reading of it.

A footnote: There are those who keep recommending Peter Gay's Bourgeois Experience over this book. Assuredly, fine histories of the Victorian era abound. Gay's is not one of them. Gay is as opaque as Wilson is quirky. Some readers may prefer to strain their eyes over the opaque, but I'll take Wilson's brand of quirkiness any day, or, mayhap, into the wee hours of the night.
Mr.Bean
I read A.N. Wilson's "The Victorians" after having previously read its sequel, "After the Victorians". The latter book I enjoyed immensely. However, the first book proved to be somewhat disappointing.

As its title would suggest, "The Victorians" is a broad sweeping history of the years of Queen Victoria's reign from 1837 to 1901; a period of England's greatest achievements and before its spectacular fall resulting from the First World War. Wilson introduces us to all the great players of the era from Robert Peel though John Stuart Mill to Salisbury and David Lloyd George. Yet for all the richness of the characters and events of the time, Wilson somehow fails to land a punch.

If I was asked about the highlight of the book, I would unequivocally raise a point near the very start of the book concerning the legitimacy of Victoria herself. Wilson makes the fascinating point that she is probably illegitimate. Indeed, hemophilia seems to have started only with her; very strange. Conversely, the madness of King George, despite having hereditary roots, is never seen again in the English aristocracy. If Wilson's point is correct then the whole British monarchy is built on a house of cards.

Yet for all the fascination of the point of Victoria's legitimacy or otherwise, the remainder of the book fails to live up to this early piece of regal salaciousness. This is too bad. The material is rich and when Wilson does come to write a sequel, this latter work is truly great.