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e-Book Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes epub download

e-Book Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes epub download

Author: Will Self
ISBN: 1608192334
Pages: 288 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (October 26, 2010)
Language: English
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
Size ePUB: 1317 kb
Size Fb2: 1310 kb
Size DJVU: 1942 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 961
Format: lrf azw txt mobi
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes epub download

by Will Self



Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes is the seventh collection of short stories by Will Self a collection of two novell.

Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes is the seventh collection of short stories by Will Self a collection of two novellas and two longer short stories, all on a liverish theme. Each story features different people suffering from different forms of liver damage.

If a passer-by noticed this four-foot-wide crevice in the brick bluffs and ventured inside, he would be transported back to the era when a huge rookery of slums roosted here, its smoke-blackened hovels, festooned with smutty.

If a passer-by noticed this four-foot-wide crevice in the brick bluffs and ventured inside, he would be transported back to the era when a huge rookery of slums roosted here, its smoke-blackened hovels, festooned with smutty laundry, over-toppling a maze of alleyways that, as thin and dark as ruptured veins, wormed their way crazily through the face o.

Certainly his characters’ lives and livers are in very bad shape, but it would take more than a good detox, or even a transplant, to return them to health.

Will Self's story cycle "Liver" is definitely anything but a celebration of such a crucially important component of the body. Rather, his surface anatomy of four lobes is a dissection of the extent to which the organ is neglected, abused and in a permanent state of decay

Will Self's story cycle "Liver" is definitely anything but a celebration of such a crucially important component of the body. Rather, his surface anatomy of four lobes is a dissection of the extent to which the organ is neglected, abused and in a permanent state of decay.

Liver - Booker prize nominee Will Self's extraordinary examination of lives out of control'Magnificent, horribly funny' The Times'Brilliant

Liver - Booker prize nominee Will Self's extraordinary examination of lives out of control'Magnificent, horribly funny' The Times'Brilliant

Liver: A Fictional Organ With a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes. If a passer-by noticed this four-foot-wide crevice in the brick bluffs and ventured inside, he would be transported back to the era when a huge rookery of slums roosted here, its smoke-blackened hovels, festooned with smutty laundry, over-toppling a maze of alleyways that, as thin and dark as ruptured veins, wormed their way crazily through the face of.

This inspired collection of four stories uses the liver as framework and controlling . Page 112 of Liver: A Fictional Organ with a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes.

This inspired collection of four stories uses the liver as framework and controlling metaphor – there’s a tale for each lobe – but is less interested in the organ as a metabolic regulator than in what happens when it’s damaged beyond repair. De humani corporis fabrica libri septem is a set of books on human anatomy written by Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) and published in 1543. It was a major advance in the history of anatomy over the long-dominant work of Galen, and presented itself as such.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Liver: A Fictional Organ With a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

and text on lining papers. Foie humain - Leberknödel - Prometheus - Birdy num num. "Ah! Val Charmichael's nose - a treaties could have been written on it; indeed, it looked as if an unseen hand had begun to do exactly that - poking with steely nib at its sub-surface blood vessels and pricking them into the raised, purplish calligraphy of spider angioma, a definitive statement that the Plantation Club's owner was already in the early stages of. Cirrhosis.

Liver: A Fictional Organ With a Surface Anatomy of Four Lobes. Will Self’s remarkable new stories center on the disease and decay that target the largest of human organs: the liver.

A collection of four related stories, centered on the largest of human organs: the liver. In a dusty London drinking club and an efficient euthanasia clinic, a glossy ad agency and a junky's windowless flat, Self's characters are slowly losing their livers―to cirrhosis, to cancer, to a hungry griffon vulture. Through the organic woes of these afflicted individuals, Self considers appetites and addictions, disease and decay, in a way that is at once demented, funny, and moving.

Jugore
It takes some effort to read Will Self, whose expansive vocabulary and dense narrative style challenges readers to get through even a single page without reaching for the dictionary. "Liver" is in many ways a typical Self book, graced by irretrievably graceless characters bringing ruin to their already ruined lives. But what sets this book apart from some of his others is the way it incorporates the most serious of pathos (the story "Leberknodel") alongside pure farce (the story "Premoetheus"), while maintaining a credible link between them. I was introduced to Self many years ago through the books "My Idea of Fun" and "Great Apes", which despite their complex and cerebral constructions still felt like extended jokes to me. Then I read "How The Dead Live," and felt wholly unprepared for the drama and poignancy Self was so clearly capable of producing. "Liver" is a collection of four stories nominally connected to one another, each allowing Self to present a different side of his sneeringly omniscient narrator's perspective, and what impressed me most was the apparent ease with which he could switch from dark comedy to dark drama. I particularly enjoyed the first two stories in the collection. "Foie Humain" may be a veiled commentary on the innate cruelty of humankind, but it works as an ensemble character study, a dynamic damning of group dynamics. Followed by the previously mentioned "Leberknodel", whose tone, style and subject matter are so completely different, the book could have stopped there and still have been a potent literary accomplishment. Although the third and fourth stories are not as compelling as the first two (to me, at least), they are perhaps perfect complements in that they allow for a gradual winding down from the book's preceding intensity. It isn't that they are bad -- there isn't a sour note in the whole book -- but they don't feel as complete as the first two stories, nor as integrated in the larger body of work here. Nonetheless, I was sorry when the book came to an end.
Mikale
The author is creative to a fault. He's smart, well educated and a pretentious show off. If this book were an emperor, he would be wearing no clothes. A negative star would be lovely. I struggled through the bile to the bitter end and couldn't wait to be done with it.
Fenrikasa
A book with a single internal organ as its unifying theme. Excellent. I double-dog dare you to find a likable character in this collection of stories; I sure couldn't do it. The book, on the other hand, I liked- a lot. Will Self makes painfully clear how he feels about the human condition. We are gluttons, slowly poisoning ourselves with various toxins . . . er, intoxicants, and we are not terribly kind to those around us, and most notably to those closest to us. Each story has its own unique twists and turns. The first story puts us in a seedy bar in London, the smell of which nearly rises from the page. We are introduced to a sorry lot of lifelong (until death) patrons, each on his on leg of the journey to death by alcohol. The second story is about a woman dying of cancer who is suddenly cured just as she has chosen to end her own life. How will she treat this gift? Mad Men meets mythology in modern day London in "Prometheus." The final story reminds us that alcohol and cancer are not the only things that destroy the human liver. Here we meet addicts swirling down their own chosen drain. Will there be redemption? What do you think?

Self is obviously a bright man, and I'm certain that I missed a number of references and metaphors in Liver, still, I think this one is a keeper.
Querlaca
Will Self's story cycle "Liver" is definitely anything but a celebration of such a crucially important component of the body. Rather, his surface anatomy of four lobes is a dissection of the extent to which the organ is neglected, abused and in a permanent state of decay. Nay, Liver is not necessarily about the liver at all, but instead a survey of the bilious, fetid human condition; the organ itself is the link that connects the lobules of each character into one stinking gestalt of unpleasantness that, Self stresses, is born completely voluntarily.

Excruciating detail is the rule for this story cycle. The epicenter concerns particular emphasis upon the Plantation Club, a highly distinguished fellowship devoted to the gavage of willfully force-drinking their on-coming death. Secondly, the sojourn of a cold, cancerous woman to Switzerland and her assisted deathbed, though ever unsure whether she will be cured either of her ailment or pestilential daughter. Third, a revisit to the tale of Prometheus, where his daily grind as a highly ambitious advertising agent necessitates the acceptance of a large bird of prey. Though not to be outperformed, finally, by the surprisingly cogent narration of unlikeliest protagonists, observing and deliberating upon an evening soiree of intermingling junkies.

Self doesn't as much tell stories as he unleashes a highly colorful stream of consciousness, or unconsciousness if you prefer, among his characters and setting, which predominantly consists of the alleys of unkempt London. His rich vocabulary is a gavage unto itself, deliciously force-feeding the reader with "the chronic, the progressive, and the degenerative - a bit like civilization" as he will emphasize. Everyone experiences their own personal sepsis in this work, as Self most intellectually spares no expense describing all manner of bodily fluids and open sores. The reader may take caution, however, as the author's immense vocabulary and wit make this a slow and sinuous digestion.