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e-Book Palm Latitudes (Contemporary American Fiction) epub download

e-Book Palm Latitudes (Contemporary American Fiction) epub download

Author: Kate Braverman
ISBN: 0140126406
Pages: 384 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books (October 1, 1989)
Language: English
Category: United States
Size ePUB: 1935 kb
Size Fb2: 1165 kb
Size DJVU: 1920 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 185
Format: mobi lit rtf lrf
Subcategory: Literature

e-Book Palm Latitudes (Contemporary American Fiction) epub download

by Kate Braverman



Title: Palm Latitudes (Contemporary American Fiction) Author(s): Kate Braverman ISBN: 0-14-012640-6 .

Written nearly a decade after Lithium for Medea, Palm Latitudes, Kate Braverman's second novel and arguably her chef d'oeuvre, explores the intertwined lives of three women who await absolution and revelation in the bougainvillea- and violence-filled "barrio" of Los Angeles.

Books related to Palm Latitudes.

Widely acclaimed as a masterpiece, this novel from the O. Henry Award winner is finally back in print. In her acclaimed second novel, Braverman explores the intertwined lives of three women - a prosperous whore, a murderous housewife, and a weary matriarch - who await absolution and revelation in the bougainvillaea- and violence-filled barrio of Los Angeles.

Published 1989 by Penguin Books in New York, NY. Written in English. Contemporary American fiction. Fiction, Mexican American women, Women prophets, Prostitutes, Women, Protected DAISY, In library.

Kate Braverman was born on Febraury 5, 1949 in Philadelphia. She has a BA in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and an MA in English from Sonoma State University

Kate Braverman was born on Febraury 5, 1949 in Philadelphia. She has a BA in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and an MA in English from Sonoma State University. She was a member of the Venice Poetry Workshop, Professor of Creative Writing at California State University, Los Angeles, staff faculty of the UCLA Writer's Program. She also taught privately a workshop which included Janet Fitch, Cristina Garcia and Donald Rawley.

KATE BRAVERMAN is a native of Los Angeles who grew up surrounded by the counterculture of San Francisco

KATE BRAVERMAN is a native of Los Angeles who grew up surrounded by the counterculture of San Francisco. She has published several novels, including The Incantation of Frida K. (2002), Wonders of the West (1993), Palm Latitudes (1988), and Lithium for Medea (1979), books of poetry-Postcards from August (1990), Hurricane Warnings (1987), Lullaby for Sinners (1980), and Milkrun (1977)-and a collection. of stories, Squandering the Blue (1990).

Kate Braverman can write! Now I can hardly wait to discover some of her more . Palm Latitudes is an extraordinary work which traces the rooted infrastructure of three women's lives, each one a hybrid creation.

Kate Braverman can write! Now I can hardly wait to discover some of her more recent creations. To read Braverman's poetic masterpiece is to experience literary alchemy.

Kate Braverman (February 5, 1949 – October 12, 2019) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet. She was born in Philadelphia and moved to Los Angeles in 1958 with her family; . is the focus for much of her writing

Kate Braverman (February 5, 1949 – October 12, 2019) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet. is the focus for much of her writing. Braverman had a BA in Anthropology from University of California, Berkeley and an MA in English from Sonoma State University.

Kate Braverman (Braverman, Kate). used books, rare books and new books. Palm Latitudes (Contemporary American Fiction): ISBN 9780140126402 (978-0-14-012640-2) Softcover, Penguin Books, 1989. Postcard from August. Find all books by 'Kate Braverman' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Kate Braverman'. The Incantation of Frida K. by Kate Braverman. ISBN 9781458783219 (978-1-4587-8321-9) Softcover, ReadHowYouWant, 2010.

Tells the stories of Francisca Ramos, a prostitute, Gloria Hernandez, a young housewife, and Marta Ortega, an elderly halfbreed, who live in the Los Angeles barrio
Fearlessdweller
underrated author. dense poetry, trance writing with clear narrative lines and character development. the juncture of surrealist imagery and interior dialogue on one hand with well developed sharp characterizations, and strong doses of irony is very striking. Braverman's short stories are even stronger in my opinion.
porosh
Buy everything Braverman writes!
Goltigor
This book, written in 1988, is the story of women living in a LA barrio. It is written in a sensual, symbolic way, full of magical, intellectual, physical descriptions. How women deal with the changing times, “old ways” to new ways, how they are raised, aspire to be wives or lovers or professions, what they pass on to their children and grandchildren—all these are elaborated on. The writer uses “women” as a plural often, as well as the specifics of a woman. The story involves betrayals, ambitions, brutalities, disappointments; it describes the ascent and decent of desires and value systems in three generations. The author brings the personalities of her characters into focus by describing their actions and thoughts on religion, philosophy, education, fashion, plants and trees and flowers, food, romance, and, mostly, Family . The author's writing style is unique and repetitive--like a litany--bringing the reader closer to the soul or answer to the question: How does a woman feel, survive and grow?
Uaha
I first read this novel shortly after it was published, in 1988. Returning to it recently, I was pleased to discover the vivid, incendiary prose remains as compelling as ever. I can read this book many times and never be bored. Each sentence is like a poem. The story becomes more meaningful to me as I grow older; the language itself creates a lush world unlike any other. Over and over I am struck by certain sentences, phrases. Kate Braverman can write! Now I can hardly wait to discover some of her more recent creations.
Paster
I read Palm Latitudes while being snowed in during a freak blizzard, without power, heat or lights. I read most of the book out loud, the brillance of the language, the power of the word and a solitary candle kept me warm. It was as if I entered those Palm Latitudes during that snowstorm and those characters were with me.

Braverman, a Jewish woman, got a lot of flack for using three Latina voices for her characters. What her critics failed to recognized was she was creating a mythology, both feminine and tropical and it had nothing to do with the old white ways.

One of the characters in the novel comes to the realization, "We don't live in an age of anxiety. We live in an age of terror." I think this novel was ahead of it's time (written in the early 80's and not published until '89) with it's inclusion of AIDS, and the only redeemable males in the novel are homosexual, perhaps most people are not ready to enter these Latitudes. But if you deny yourself access, you'll be denying yourself the magic that the written page was meant to offer.
Kekinos
If this author did not have an excellent reputation as a poet, it's hard to imagine this novel would ever have been published. There are so many exquisite lines that could have won the Bulwer Lytton contest for the worst first sentence of a novel that in their 'poesy' keep you laughing. My favorite is one which is about a person whose eyes were the blue color of the pilot light of a stove of (and now I am making this up to match my recollection) owned by a man who..... add a full description of the rest of the house and how much he pays his gardener. Yes, if you are a fan of the music of words you will like this, but if you try to imagine a scene related to what the words describe you will find yourself in hysterics or scratching your head in a 'say what'. Either that or you will get seasick as you imagine the waving oleanders. It's been several years since I read this novel but chanced upon it on this website. Despite the excess, the story is a rose among the thorns of excessive writing that is worth reading.
Ferne
Kate Braverman is a writer who has been praised highly by important writers like John Rechy and Joan Didion. In this novel, Braverman continues to assert her unique view of modern life, especially in Los Angeles, which becomes a metaphor for greater latitudes. Her prose is rich and evocative, haunting at times. That this novel and others of her writings are out of print testifies to the indifference of publishers today to fulfilling their function to perpetuate fine writing.
I first came across Ms. Braverman through a serendipitous reading of her Squandering the Blue. Palm Latitudes is an extraordinary work which traces the rooted infrastructure of three women's lives, each one a hybrid creation of the industrial village of Los Angeles, each one a cantadora of resonant flesh and spirit. To read Braverman's poetic masterpiece is to experience literary alchemy. I keep the novel at my bedside, as I have done for the past five years, and am repeatedly renewed by its presence. This is an masterful author to cherish; this is a work to sustain you through life's many quickenings and passages.