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e-Book The Man Who Smiled (Kurt Wallander Mysteries, Book 4) (Kurt Wallander Mysteries (Audio)) epub download

e-Book The Man Who Smiled (Kurt Wallander Mysteries, Book 4) (Kurt Wallander Mysteries (Audio)) epub download

Author: Henning Mankell
ISBN: 0786173114
Publisher: Blackstone Audio; Unabridged MP3CD edition (September 16, 2006)
Language: English
Category: Mystery
Size ePUB: 1362 kb
Size Fb2: 1598 kb
Size DJVU: 1412 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 521
Format: txt doc lit azw
Subcategory: Mystery

e-Book The Man Who Smiled (Kurt Wallander Mysteries, Book 4) (Kurt Wallander Mysteries (Audio)) epub download

by Henning Mankell



Book 4 of 10 in the Kurt Wallander Series.

Book 4 of 10 in the Kurt Wallander Series. The tone, pace and thought processes of Ystad Chief of Detectives Kurt Wallander are noir, constructed around the idea that age 50 is old. OMG! Mankell has never met perky Californians, for whom 50 is the new 30.

Translated from the Swedish by Laurie Thompson. For more than a year Kurt Wallander, a detective chief inspector with the Ystad police, had been on sick leave, unable to carry out his duties

Translated from the Swedish by Laurie Thompson. The harvill press london. For more than a year Kurt Wallander, a detective chief inspector with the Ystad police, had been on sick leave, unable to carry out his duties. During that time a sense of powerlessness had come to dominate his life and affected his actions. Time and time again, when he could not bear to stay in Ystad and had some money to spare, he had gone off on pointless journeys in the vain hope of feeling better, perhaps even of recovering his zest for life, if only he were somewhere other than Skåne.

The Man Who Smiled book. The Man Who Smiled begins with Inspector Kurt Wallander deep in a personal and professional crisis after killing a man in the line of duty; eventually, he vows to quit the Ystad police force for good. Just then, however, a friend who had asked Wallander to look into the death of his father winds up dead himself, shot three times.

Home Henning Mankell An Event in Autumn: A Kurt Wallander Mystery. An event in autumn a ku. .An Event in Autumn: A Kurt Wallander Mystery, . He is the first winner of the Ripper Award (the new European prize for crime fiction) and has also received the Glass Key and Golden Dagger awards. His Kurt Wallander mysteries have been adapted into a PBS television series starring Kenneth Branagh. Mankell divides his time between Sweden and Mozambique.

The Man Who Smiled (Kurt Wallander, I kinda like this Swedish writer. I've read about 5 or 6 of his books and I'd say I enjoy them.

Kurt Wallander Detective Series Best Mysteries New Press Apartheid Nelson Mandela Homeland Housewife Scandinavian. The White Lioness: A Mystery (Kurt Wallander Mysteries) by Henning Mankell. The Man Who Smiled (Kurt Wallander, I kinda like this Swedish writer. The Man Who Smiled: A Kurt Wallander Mystery by Henning Mankell, Laurie Thompson.

The White Lioness kw-3 (Kurt Wallander Henning Mankell. Year Published: 2001. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Year Published: 1995. Year Published: 1998. Year Published: 2014. Year Published: 1991. Year Published: 2007.

Kurt Wallander (Swedish pronunciation: ) is a fictional character created by Swedish crime writer Henning Mankell (1948 – 2015). The protagonist of many mystery novels, set in and around the town of Ystad, 56 km (35 mi) south-east of the. The protagonist of many mystery novels, set in and around the town of Ystad, 56 km (35 mi) south-east of the city of Malmö, in the southern province of Scania. Wallander has been portrayed on screen by the actors Rolf Lassgård, Krister Henriksson and Kenneth Branagh.

Here are the stories that trace, chronologically, Kurt Wallander’s growth from a rookie cop into a young father and . In The Man with the Mask, Wallander is a young father confronting an unexpected threat on Christmas Eve.

Here are the stories that trace, chronologically, Kurt Wallander’s growth from a rookie cop into a young father and then a middle-aged divorcé, illuminating how he became a first-rate detective and highlighting new facets of the character who remains one of the most impressive and credible creations of crime fiction today (The Guardian). Wallander’s First Case introduces us to the twenty-one-year-old patrolman on his first homicide case: his next-door neighbor, seemingly dead by his own hand.

Wallander, Kurt (Fictitious character). New York : New Press : Distributed by . A volume of short works featuring the popular investigator features Wallander as a young patrolman on his first case, a new father facing unexpected danger on Christmas Eve, a middle-aged man solving a poisoning death, a separated husband investigating a photographer's murder, and a veteran detective connecting a dual murder to a plane crash. Wallander's first case - The man with the mask - The man on the beach - The death of the photographer - The pyramid.

[MP3-CD audiobook format in Vinyl case. NOTE: The MP3-CD format requires a compatible audio CD player.] [Read by Dick Hill] A disillusioned Inspector Kurt Wallander is thrown back into the fray as both hunter and hunted in this new adventure from Sweden's master of crime and mystery. Crestfallen, dejected, and spiraling into an alcohol-fuelled depression after killing a man in the line of duty, Inspector Wallander had made up his mind to quit the police force for good. But when an old acquaintance, a solicitor, seeks Wallander's help and later turns up dead, Wallander realizes that he was wrong not to listen. Warily, he returns to work to head the case. A rookie female detective has joined the force in his absence, and he adopts the role of mentor to her as they fight to unravel the mystery.
Dagdage
How to Read Henning Manekell: Think Eeyore (Winnie the Pooh)

These are not so much police procedurals as slow ruminations about changes in Swedish society after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the nature of crime in the new European order. These changes are recorded and assessed through the prism of Detective Kurt Wallander, the main character. The books are also deliciously constructed story and character arcs, drawn out over time.

The tone, pace and thought processes of Ystad Chief of Detectives Kurt Wallander are noir, constructed around the idea that age 50 is old. OMG! Mankell has never met perky Californians, for whom 50 is the new 30. Really. Cue the sound track to Wallander/Mankell's ruminations on old age, vicious, clever crimes, excessive drink, a wasted life, a critical father, fog fog fog, the ex-wife, unrequited love, understaffed police. Dum ta dum dum.

Friends have been appalled at the violence and dark tone (that would be the "noir") of the Swedish series on Netflix, similar to what's in his books, but there's a joke in the midst of all that angst, mayhem, evil and dysfunctional family relations -- and the actions of a depressed, mostly unarmed detective who habitually lies to his colleagues. Think Eeyore from "Winnie the Pooh," ever pessimistic. Then chalk up Eeyore points as you read (or watch). OMG! Fog! A blizzard like a hurricane! Wallander gained a few stones! He is depressed! He can't afford a new stereo system! OMG! Wallander's detective work is compelling and elegant, nonetheless ... and pretty soon, you start laughing. There's only so much middle age that one can take.

The author is brilliant, as are his books. Insights about the collapse of the Soviet Union, transformations of criminal activity in the post-modern world, etc. are striking, plus the guy can write. Mankell disclaims in interviews any resemblance to his main character, but the actual resemblance is between the author and Wallander's father, the critical, grumpy guy who could no more stop painting the same landscape over and over than Mankell could quit imagining and writing scenarios of stunning gloom.

The slow, slow, sloooow pace of "The Man Who Smiled" is enough to have you on the edge of your chair. When the action picks up at the end, you fall off. Having moved on to "Sidetracked," the next book in the series, I personally am smiling as the painted stranger sinks an ax into the spine of of a bureaucratic bad guy whose tastes run to very young women. Payback, Swedish style.
Capella
Okay, my fiancé in Sweden told me to read Mankell because his books are amazing. Well, I’ve been struggling for two months to get pulled into this book but it’s torture. I know he is supposed to be such an incredible author and maybe I picked a bad book of his to start with? Wallander just floats around this story popping in here and there and not really energetic or committed to doing anything but feeling depressed. It’s a real downer. I don’t have the heart to tell my fiancé though because he was so excited for me to read the Wallander series. I don’t see what makes Mankell more special than other crime writers. I was hoping for a real brain teaser like Christie or a crime adventure like Grafton or Peters... sigh.
Gavinranadar
I can't get enough of Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander series. I've had to slow down because I've gone through them so fast that I have only a few more to read and then must go on to his other books without Wallander. There is no other way to describe Mankell's writing other than it is crime fiction at its best. The Scandinavian crime and mystery writers seem to be particularly good at setting the atmosphere that sets up the mood for the whole book and story. "The Man Who Smiled" begins in the nighttime on a lonely stretch of road in a very thick fog that lawyer Gustaf Torstensson is driving through, trying to make his way home. He sees something ahead that turns out to be an effigy in a chair in the middle of the road, gets out of his car and as he tries to see what it is, he is attacked from behind and is killed. It is ruled as an accident since the car is found wrecked.

Meanwhile, Wallander has been on sick leave after suffering the mental consequences of shooting and killing a man in the line of duty and he has retreated to Skagan in Denmark to find some peace and confirm within himself that he is not returning to police work in Ystad. He has had enough. While there he is visited by Gustaf Torstensson's son, Sten, also a lawyer and he asks for Wallander's help. Kurt doesn't want to get involved with it, but within a short time Sten is also dead. Wallander returns to Ystad and with these two deaths and the fact that he didn't help Sten, he returns to the Ystad Police Department.

This is a fairly complex mystery that centers around a very wealthy and shady Swedish businessman who has moved to Skane and who smiles such a benevolent smile that Wallander knows that evil lies behind it. He and Ann-Britt Hoglund take on the case and soon learn that someone is out to stop them from learning the truth. The story moves along at a steady pace and there are twists and turns and deception around every corner.

I noticed that some other reviewers mentioned the difference in translators and it does show from book to book when they change. This book was translated by someone different from the person who translated "One Step Behind" which is exceptionally well-written and translated, in my opinion. In a few spots in "The Man Who Smiled" there were some words that didn't fit very well.

One source said that this book is the third in the series and another said it's the fourth, so I'm not sure which is correct. Either way I loved it and I highly recommend the entire series.