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e-Book Every Bitter Thing: A Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation Set in Brazil epub download

e-Book Every Bitter Thing: A Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation Set in Brazil epub download

Author: Leighton Gage
ISBN: 1569478457
Pages: 288 pages
Publisher: Soho Crime; 1 edition (December 1, 2010)
Language: English
Category: Mystery
Size ePUB: 1908 kb
Size Fb2: 1682 kb
Size DJVU: 1227 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 670
Format: docx azw lit mobi
Subcategory: Mystery

e-Book Every Bitter Thing: A Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation Set in Brazil epub download

by Leighton Gage



Chief Inspector Mario Silva of the Brazilian Federal Police is back, this time handling a political hot potato. The son of the Venezuelan foreign minister has been killed, and Silva's boss always gives priority to cases involving powerful people

Chief Inspector Mario Silva of the Brazilian Federal Police is back, this time handling a political hot potato. The son of the Venezuelan foreign minister has been killed, and Silva's boss always gives priority to cases involving powerful people. At first it looks like the act of a jealous gay lover, but Silva and his team delve into the data base and find several other murders with exactly the same signature.

Written by. Leighton Gage. Not specified Mint Near mint Good Average Poor. Private notes Only visible to you. Manufacturer: Soho Crime Release date: 1 December 2010 ISBN-10 : 1569478457 ISBN-13: 9781569478455. or cancel.

Every Bitter Thing: A Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation Set in Brazil. With each book, Silva and company seem to get more interesting. A VINE IN THE BLOOD is one of those special novels you sit down with and before you realize it you're fifty pages along.

Gage has the ability to use the same central characters in the same setting and write different stories as if everything and everyone is new. There is no danger that this series will become stale.

Buried Strangers (Chief Inspector Mario Silva Leighton Gage. Year Published: 2009. Every Bitter Thing cims-4 (Chief Inspector Mario Silva #4). Year Published: 2007. Year Published: 2012. Year Published: 2006. Year Published: 2014.

Praise for Every Bitter Thing "The odd thing about this detective [is . product description page.

Praise for Every Bitter Thing "The odd thing about this detective the elasticity of his ethics, not his essential integrity makes him irresistible. The case takes Silva and his team all over Brazil in an engaging, fast-paced story that is hard to put away for the night. Every Bitter Thing - (Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation) by Leighton Gage (Paperback).

Praise for Leighton Gage’s Chief Inspector Mario Silva series: Realistic characters that the readers .

Praise for Leighton Gage’s Chief Inspector Mario Silva series: Realistic characters that the readers can care about. As Chief Inspector Mario Silva has learned, justice is hard to come by in Brazil, so when his niece tells him about a possible genocide deep in the jungle, he agrees to round up his team and charter a plane to Pará to check it out. Thirty-nine natives have recently dropped dead of mysterious causes.

Gage sets his Chief Inspector Mario Silva series in Brazil. Every Bitter Thing takes place mostly in Sao Paulo and Brasilia. Mr. Gage, although not a native, gives us a strong, vivid, and sharply drawn portrait of the country that demonstrates his intimacy with the locale. He paints a portrait of a beautiful country marred by violence, corruption, and poverty. The first two victims are an engineer.

But Silva and his team of colorful Gonçalves, who is irresistible to lady witnesses; chubby, crass Nuñes; Mara Carta, the chief of intelligence with a soft spot for Mario-crack their difficult and sometimes ugly cases with pizazz

The son of the foreign minister of Venezuela has been found dead in his apartment in Brasilia. Due to the political nature of the crime, Chief Inspector Mario Silva of Brazil’s federal police is called in to investigate. As Silva delves deeper, he discovers that a chain of murders have occurred throughout Brazil, all with the same MO: victims are first shot in the stomach, then brutally beaten to death.

The son of the Foreign Minister of Venezuela is found dead in his apartment in Brasilia. Due to the political nature of the crime, Chief Inspector Mario Silva of Brazil's Federal Police is called in to investigate. As he delves deeper into the murder, he discovers that a chain of murders have occurred throughout Brazil, all with the same MO: victims are first shot in the stomach, then brutally beaten to death, and, even more puzzling, they were all passengers on TAB flight 8101 from Miami to São Paulo. What sinister motive connects these killings? And why does it appear one passenger on that flight, a fifteen-year-old boy who was later raped and killed in prison, is at the heart of it all?
Zeks Horde
I was sent to this book by other Amazon reviewers and am grateful to them. Plan to read the others.
The positives of this book:
1. The writing is taut and and prose is beautifully descriptive. I have only been to Brazil for a tourist stopover, but I can see the places in the writing.
2. The characters (mainly policemen and women) are well drawn and, together, are quite a bit more than the sum of their parts.
3. The police work at a series of baffling and horrible murders and with diligent work, discover that they are connected. They keep being diligent and creative (how they found a pair of suspects who are hiding was quite creative). Eventually, they identify the who and the why. They would have eventually gotten there by the process of elimination. I am entertained by this, I think real, portrayal of how crimes are solved. No genius, no miraculous insight. Just hard work by folks with different skills. (There is a totally tangential character who illustrates the need for diversity of skill: his is skill at delivering very sad news.)
4. All of the murders are tragedies but one is a tragedy and a terrible sin and was caused by laziness and indifference. The detectives and the reader share anger about this sin.
5. There are some good detectives who are capable and are interested in doing their jobs well. There are also some despicable people and some fools on the police force. Much like real life. The description of the powerful fool is particularly well drawn.

The author paints a Brazilian bureaucracy and police force that is politically driven (one of the victims is the son of a well connected figure) and which targets resources according to class. Part of the plot included bribery of police officials. I read other reviewers viewing this as particularly Brazilian. I differ and believe that focus on crimes affecting the more privileged and the disregard for folks of unknown privilege are very much in place in the US criminal justice system. Callous treatment of folks thought to be poor and unconnected also happens here, as does bribery. We in the US also promote total jerks to positions of power. So I see this as life, not as Brazilian life.

I do have a significant criticism. The last two pages of the book, IMHO, do not follow from the story and were not expected actions from the characters developed in the book. This unconnected ending was also unrealistic and unnecessary. I could say more but do not want to spoil. I am willing to pretend that these pages did not exist.
Usaxma
Among the many things I love about this author is his uncanny ability to situate you in a real life environment, draw accurate and poignant characters and keep you on the edge of your seat throughout. The writing is crisp and sharp with insightful and real commentary all along the way. One of the things I always loved about John D. McDonald was his ability to make social commentary on the actions of the characters, society and common prevailing beliefs without ever getting preachy or didactic... just slipping it in the most natural of ways. You read those books as much for how McDonald saw the world and his commentary on it as you did for the action and character development. I think Mr. Gage is on to the same rich vein here and, to me, his wry and practiced eye reveals a world to us that we would never penetrate on our own. Bravo for another tour de force.
Swiang
Chief Inspector Mario Silva of the Brazilian Federal Police is back, this time handling a political hot potato. The son of the Venezuelan foreign minister has been killed, and Silva's boss always gives priority to cases involving powerful people.

At first it looks like the act of a jealous gay lover, but Silva and his team delve into the data base and find several other murders with exactly the same signature. The next challenge is to find a connection among these victims, who live in different cities and have absolutely nothing in common.

The plot of Every Bitter Thing is quite clever. Lucky hunches and accidental discoveries alternate with lots of nitty-gritty police work.

There's a high body count and a brutal MO, so the reader needs some tolerance for violence. But the book is a treat for readers who appreciate exotic locales. Inspector Silva's Brazil offers dangerous roads haunted by robbers, streets where johns cruise for prostitutes, wealthy gated communities and places where tourists never go.

Overall, Every Bitter Thing is a satisfying police procedural with an engaging cast of cops.

There's not much detail about the personal lives of the detectives in this book. For all the back stories, I recommend reading the series in order: (1) Blood of the Wicked, (2) Buried Strangers, (3) Dying Gasp and (4) Every Bitter Thing.
Maman
The story and the characters were excellent. A little hard to believe that an airline clerk could carry out that many murders so quickly. Some good details about Brasil help foster the story forward.
Ffrlel
Don't pick up Every Bitter Thing if you plan to read a chapter or two a night for the next week. It is far too suspenseful, too exciting and too intricate to put down for something as mundane as getting some sleep before you go to work the next day. The plot is complex with new twists every time you think you're beginning to unravel it. This is a classic who-done-it. It is also violent and brutal. Leighton Gage shows a side of life some people don't want to see. But it is a honest portrait of a reality that lies far East of Eden with a population bleeding from thorn and briar gashes but alive and alert and clawing through the vines to pull themselves ahead. The ray of compassion and hope penetrating through the jungle is Mario Silva of Brazil's Federal Police, the protagonist of at least three previous Gage novels. In spite of working in an inefficient, corrupt political system that makes it easy for brutal criminals to thrive, Silva manages to achieve at least specific independent instances of poetic justice. The conclusion of this novel is brilliant and completely satisfying.