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e-Book The G-String Murders (Femmes Fatales) epub download

e-Book The G-String Murders (Femmes Fatales) epub download

Author: Rachel Shteir,Gypsy Rose Lee
ISBN: 1558615032
Pages: 240 pages
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY (June 1, 2005)
Language: English
Category: Mystery
Size ePUB: 1828 kb
Size Fb2: 1500 kb
Size DJVU: 1202 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 885
Format: docx mobi rtf lrf
Subcategory: Mystery

e-Book The G-String Murders (Femmes Fatales) epub download

by Rachel Shteir,Gypsy Rose Lee



Gypsy Rose Lee, aka Rose Louise Hovick (1911-1970), is best recalled as one of the very few-possibly the only-strip .

Gypsy Rose Lee, aka Rose Louise Hovick (1911-1970), is best recalled as one of the very few-possibly the only-strip tease performers who became a household name during an era when such performers were not mentioned at the family dinner table. The G-String Murders is not and never will be placed among the great titles of the murder mystery genre, but it offers a surprisingly open portrait of a theatrical era and performance venue that is long gone, hounded out of existence by the puritanical.

The G-String Murder is a murder mystery featuring Gypsy Rose as the .

The G-String Murder is a murder mystery featuring Gypsy Rose as the narrator. In the novel, she is a featured performer in a New York burlesque theatre known as The Old Opera Theatre and romantically inclined to Brannigan, the lead comic in the show.

Gypsy Rose Lee, Rachel Shteir (Afterword). Craig Rice (co-writer)

Gypsy Rose Lee, Rachel Shteir (Afterword). Craig Rice (co-writer). The G-String Murders is one of those books that is eclipsed by the fame of its author, in this case the most famous strip-tease artiste of them all, Gypsy Rose Lee. For many years it was claimed that the book was ghost-written by successful mystery writer Craig Rice (a pseudonym used by Georgiana Ann Craig). It now seems to be generally accepted that in fact Gypsy Rose Lee wrote the book herself.

Written by "intelligent stripper" Gypsy Rose Lee The G String Murders became a salacious best seller in 1940's Соавтор. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное, исправленное.

Written by "intelligent stripper" Gypsy Rose Lee The G String Murders became a salacious best seller in 1940's. Vividly set in the deliciously seedy world of burlesque this is a crime story to read. Gypsy Rose Lee (1911-1970) was the most acclaimed strip tease artist of her day. She later made 12 films and hosted her own TV show. Her autobiography Gypsy spawned the famed musical and two film versions. Библиографические данные. The G-String Murders Femmes Fatales.

The G-String Murders (Femmes Fatales). Lee, Gypsy Rose/ Shteir, Rachel (Afterword). Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women's writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century. Published by The Feminist Press at CUNY. ISBN 10: 1558615032 ISBN 13: 9781558615038. Published by Feminist Pr (2005). From mystery to hard-boiled noir to taboo lesbian romance, these rediscovered queens of pulp offer subversive perspectives on a turbulent era.

The G-String Murders. by Gypsy Rose Lee, Rachel Shteir. series Femmes Fatales. This is a world where women struggle to earn a living performing bumps and grinds, have gangster boyfriends, sip beer between acts and pay their own way at dinner. Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women’s writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century.

The G-String Murders is a 1941 detective novel written by American burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee. There have been claims made that the novel was written by mystery writer Craig Rice.

Gypsy Rose Lee Rachel Shteir (afterword). The basis of the 1943 film Lady of Burlesque starring Barbara Stanwyck, The G-String Murders was the first of two murder mysteries written by Gypsy Rose Lee. A natural-born raconteur, Lee also contributed short pieces to The New Yorker and hosted her own television talk show; even her unparalleled stardom in the burlesque world was attributed more to her witty banter than to her risqué moves. It is this fabled wit, along with Gypsy's brassy sociology, that make The G-String Murders a must-read primer of sex, commerce and urban living. Ask class-A headliner Gypsy Rose Lee. The ecdysiast extraordinaire has just found sewer-mouthed Burly Q tart Lolita La Verne in the dressing room with a rhinestone G-string wrapped tight around her freshly powdered neck. It’s enough to give a decent dame the shakes. It’s also casting a hot-pink spotlight on a roster of suspects including Dynamic Dolly, notorious for her backstage brawls. Not to mention the loitering thugs, oily managers, frustrated sugar daddies, and any number of low-end Times Square artistes looking for a bump up on the bill.

Gypsy Rose Lee allegedly hard at work on her mystery novel (Eliot Elisofon. Indeed, the book tries quite hard at the outset to be fairly piquant with its frequent references to toilets (all the strippers want to chip in to get a replacement one), though the toilet in question ultimately proves to be where the first body is found.

A mystery set in the underworld of burlesque theater, The G-String Murders was penned in 1941 by the legendary queen of the stripteasers—the witty and wisecracking Gypsy Rose Lee. Narrating a twisted tale of a backstage double murder, Lee provides a fascinating look behind the scenes of burlesque, richly populated by the likes of strippers Lolita LaVerne and Gee Gee Graham, comic Biff Brannigan and Siggy the g-string salesman. This is a world where women struggle to earn a living performing bumps and grinds, have gangster boyfriends, sip beer between acts and pay their own way at dinner.Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women’s writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century. From mystery to hard-boiled noir to taboo lesbian romance, these rediscovered queens of pulp offer subversive perspectives on a turbulent era. Enjoy the series: Bedelia; Bunny Lake Is Missing; By Cecile; The G-String Murders; The Girls in 3-B; Laura; The Man Who Loved His Wife; Mother Finds a Body; Now, Voyager; Return to Lesbos; Skyscraper; Stranger on Lesbos; Stella Dallas; Women's Barracks.
Gavirgas
Gypsy Rose Lee, aka Rose Louise Hovick (1911-1970), is best recalled as one of the very few—possibly the only—strip tease performers who became a household name during an era when such performers were not mentioned at the family dinner table. But her talents were not confined to the burlesque stage: she was a noted commentator and writer. Today the most famous of her works is the memoir GYPSY, which became the basis for the celebrated 1959 musical, but she was also the author of a play, The Naked Genius (1943), and two novels, The G-String Murders (1941) and Mother Finds a Body (1942.) The G-String Murders was a popular success, and in 1943 it was adapted to the screen as Lady of Burlesque, starring Barbara Stanwyck.

The G-String Murder is a murder mystery featuring Gypsy Rose as the narrator. In the novel, she is a featured performer in a New York burlesque theatre known as “The Old Opera Theatre” and romantically inclined to Brannigan, the lead comic in the show. There is plenty of conflict backstage, much of it centering on Lolita LaVerne, a stripper with the nasty habit of picking up other women’s men—even so, it is still a shock when Lolita turns up strangled to death, a G-string the weapon of choice.

In terms of plot, Gypsy Rose Lee wasn’t in the same league with Agatha Christie, and the convolutions tend to be excessive and the solution somewhat out of the hat. (In truth, the film does a better job, streamlining the plot into an unexpected plausibility.) But nobody really read The G-String Murders for it’s mystery; they read it for its portrait of burlesque theatre, and that’s something it delivers in full. At the time, Gypsy Rose Lee was criticized for the book’s off-color language, situations, and (for the time) somewhat shocking details. She responded to the criticism with the comment that it was an accurate portrait of backstage life in the burlesque theatre, and those associated with the business backed her up. The characters are vivid, their way of speaking is memorable, and the author captures a mixture of the glamorous and the tawdry in a way that makes the book compulsively readable. It may not be great literature, but it’s the sort of book you pick up one afternoon and finish later that night.

There has always been speculation that the book was ghosted in full or in part, with Gypsy Rose Lee’s name slapped on the cover to give the thing appeal. It does seem extremely likely that she had considerable help from friend and mystery novelist Craig Rice (aka Georgiana Craig) and possibly one or two others, but scholars who have investigated the matter report that enough of the original manuscript exists to prove that the bulk of the novel was indeed written by Gypsy Rose Lee herself, with the contribution of others generally limited to editorial input. The tone of the book itself seems to imply a central author, with the narrative voice strong, memorable, and similar to the way in which Gypsy Rose Lee spoke and to her other writings.

The G-String Murders is not and never will be placed among the great titles of the murder mystery genre, but it offers a surprisingly open portrait of a theatrical era and performance venue that is long gone, hounded out of existence by the puritanical. The Kindle edition comes with an entertaining and informative afterword by Rachel Shteir. It’s a fun read and memorable piece. Recommended.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer
Malien
This was the first best-selling book by a stripper, and it’s set in the world of burlesque, and these are the major reasons to read it. I got the library edition, which comes with an essay that tries to make the case that Gypsy Rose Lee was not merely a stripper who famously played at being an intellectual in her act, but that she was *really* an intellectual and that this book proves it. Having read the book, I can report that fans of Sartre need not fear his being replaced in the canon by Gypsy Rose Lee.

This is a pulp mystery, of interest for its origins and its window into 1930s burlesque theater. There’s a bit of great old slang in the book (“grouch bag”) and some surprising elements (in the book, Lee makes her own dresses backstage at the theater, as I suppose she did in real life). I liked a passage in which Lee, her life in danger, laments that she will never get to live in a new apartment building with trees out front in concrete boxes. It’s the most sincere moment in the book, without a hint of cliche.
Zamo
Interesting, but words and mystery primative, not as firm as Christie and Sayers. Personal author derails added to the setting if not the mystery.. (review for mother)
FailCrew
Here's a so-so murder mystery without much depth to it. The word is that Craig Rice ghosted the novel for Gypsy Rose Lee, but I didn't see any of the character and plot development in "G-String" as I do in Rice's novels that are top-notch.
Tygrarad
I was curious about her ability to write after reading her memoirs and I was not disappointed. Much like watching an old black and white movie mystery, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. If you liked The Thin Man or enjoy similar black and white movies from that era, you will enjoy this book.
Mr Freeman
Wish she had written more than three books. Her two mystery novels are fun romps, and we know how her book Gypsy lives on.
Jeb
Keep in mind that G-String was written 70 years ago--in the style and voice of another era. I must admit, I was bored sometimes and skimmed a lot until I reached the end. Very chatty dialogue, frequent humor. I did enjoy Gypsy's take on the strippers' world--written by a woman who lived the life.
I love that the Women Write Pulp people have reprinted this title. When I was a girl Gypsy had already hung up her G-string, but I loved Gypsy's talk show. My parents were slightly alarmed, but I found her amazing in a way I couldn't put words to at that age - brassy, ballsy, and uncowed I would say now. But I found this mystery very tough to get through. The writing left a lot to be deisred and unlike some other pulps it doesn't move along very well. Still I love that it's out there and it's historical/hystorical value makes it worth a look.