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e-Book The Cold Dish epub download

e-Book The Cold Dish epub download

Author: Craig Johnson
ISBN: 1439551499
Language: English
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Size ePUB: 1742 kb
Size Fb2: 1360 kb
Size DJVU: 1179 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 953
Format: lit azw doc mobi
Subcategory: Mystery

e-Book The Cold Dish epub download

by Craig Johnson



About Craig Johnson: Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the . See if your friends have read any of Craig Johnson's books

About Craig Johnson: Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. Craig Johnson an American novelist, short. See if your friends have read any of Craig Johnson's books. The Cold Dish and The Dark Horse were both Dilys Award finalists, and Death Without Company was named the Wyoming Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. Craig Johnson an American novelist, short story writer, and playwright. He lives in Ucross, near Sheridan, Wyoming, population 25.

Craig Johnson is the New York Times bestselling author of the Longmire mysteries, the basis for the hit Netflix original series Longmire. The Cold Dish takes Walt back to a case that has haunted him for a couple of years

Craig Johnson is the New York Times bestselling author of the Longmire mysteries, the basis for the hit Netflix original series Longmire. He is the recipient of the Western Writers of America Spur Award for fiction, the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award for fiction, the Nouvel Observateur Prix du Roman Noir, and the Prix SNCF du Polar. His novella Spirit of Steamboat was the first One Book Wyoming selection. The Cold Dish takes Walt back to a case that has haunted him for a couple of years. Sometimes justice isn’t exactly fair and the punishment comes no where near fitting the crime. That was how most people felt about the boys involved in the rape case.

Introducing Wyoming’s Sheriff Walt Longmire in this riveting novel from the New York Times bestselling author, the first in the Longmire mystery series. Craig Johnson’s new novel, LAND OF WOLVES, is forthcoming from Viking. Somebody, it would seem, is seeking vengeance, and Longmire might be the only thing standing between the three remaining boys and a Sharps. With lifelong friend Henry Standing Bear, Deputy Victoria Moretti, and a cast of characters both tragic and humorous enough to fill in the vast emptiness of the high plains, Walt Longmire attempts to see that revenge, a dish best served cold, is never served at all. He lives in Ucross, Wyoming, USA, population twenty-five.

Johnson' title, An Obvious Fact, the 12th book in the Walt Longmire series, became a New York Times bestseller in 2016. Библиографические данные. The Cold Dish Walt Longmire Mystery Series (Выпуск 1) Walt Longmire Series (Том 1). Автор.

Introducing Wyoming's Sheriff Walt Longmire in this riveting novel from the New York Times bestselling author of Dry Bones, the first in the Longmire mystery series, the basis for the Netflix original series LONGMIRE.

You can read book Cold Dish by Craig Johnson in our library for absolutely free. Under federal law, if you knowingly misrepresent that online material is infringing, you may be subject to criminal prosecution for perjury and civil penalties, including monetary damages, court costs, and attorneys’ fees.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

by. Johnson, Craig, 1961-. Longmire, Walt (Fictitious character), Sheriffs, Longmire, Walt (Fictitious character), Sheriffs. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on June 16, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

LONGMIRE, a new A&E drama series The first novel in the New York Times bestselling Walt Longmire mystery series In this outstanding first novel, New York Times bestselling author Craig Johnson introduces Sheriff Walt Longmire of Wyoming’s Absaroka County. Johnson draws on his background in law enforcement and his deep attachment to the American West to produce a literary mystery of stunning authenticity, and full of memorable characters. Sheriff Walt Longmire knows he’s got trouble when Cody Pritchard is found dead. Two years earlier, Cody and three accomplices had been given suspended sentences for raping a Northern Cheyenne girl. Is someone seeking vengeance? Longmire faces the most volatile and challenging case in his twenty-four years as sheriff and means to see that revenge, a dish that is best served cold, is never served at all. Watch a QuickTime movie trailer for this book! View a QuickTime interview with Craig Johnson: part one | part two
Yggdi
I don't normally write reviews but feel I should in this instance. I gave this book 5 stars but feel the need to qualify that rating. This is not the fast pace of a Dan Brown thriller. But it is very well written, with a good plot, great characters, and an unexpected twist at the end. If you have not seen the Netflix Longmire series based on these books then I suggest you watch at least one or two if possible before reading this book. My wife and I have been watching Longmire for a long time before reading this book and that is why I felt the need to give it 5 stars. Not only did I already have a connection to many of the characters I especially felt a connection to Henry Standing Bear played by Lou Diamond Phillips. Every time I read one of his lines in the book I could not help but hear Lou Diamond Phillips and also visualize his interaction with the Longmire character. My wife and I are both from the mid-west and have lived in several mid-western states including Colorado. So we have spent some time in Wyoming as well, the setting for these books. Craig Johnson's colorful descriptions make it easy for us to envision just what his characters are seeing. I think you will find this book an enjoyable read...
Jake
To be honest I've been able to get only about 1/3 of the way through the book. The number of characters is extensive and I have a hard time remembering how each of them fits into the story; troubling since I have seen all of the Longmire episodes on television. The narrative form of the book makes it difficult for me to follow some of the conversations and with the story being told through Walt Longmire's eyes, it's hard to know what the other characters are seeing. I like the descriptions of the area and I understand the underlying mystery but this is a hard book for me to follow.
Munimand
I admit that this series probably never would have made it on my reading radar if I hadn’t first watched the series on TV. I also have to admit that I never would have considered watching the series if a group of people I follow on line hadn’t talked about NF picking up the series after A&E network dropped it. The fact that I immediately searched out the Walt Longmire series by Craig Johnson after I ran out of episodes to watch should tell you something. ;) I’m going to mention the similarities and differences between the two later in the review, don’t worry.

Walt Longmire is not your average literary hero… well, actually, he is average. He’s handsome in a rugged way. He’s over 50 and he’s described more than once as being out of shape. He’s been mourning the loss of his wife long enough in his friends’ opinion, which reinforces the fact that he’s surrounded by people who care about him as much as he cares about them. He’s honest, loyal, well educated, has a strong sense of honor… basically he’s one of the most ‘real’ characters I’ve read in a long time. One of my favorite parts of reading this book was his inner dialogue. I loved it. His thoughts are easy and honest and yes, he tends to ramble, but that keeps it entertaining.

The Cold Dish takes Walt back to a case that has haunted him for a couple of years. Sometimes justice isn’t exactly fair and the punishment comes no where near fitting the crime. That was how most people felt about the boys involved in the rape case. That fact made finding a likely suspect in the death of one of the defendants almost impossible to narrow down. There were a lot of people who could have decided to become a vigilante and not blink an eye. That also meant that Walt probably knew the killer, which made his job even harder.

With the help of his best friend Henry and his staff he goes about the task of finding the killer before the next boy is killed. The story has lots of twists and turns and seems to take them a couple of steps back with every new clue they find. I can honestly say that I had no clue who the killer was until it was revealed. It might have been because I was so caught up in the story, but I think it had more to do with the writing being so good.

Beyond the good story there was a lot of witty dialogue. There are a lot of conversations between Henry and Walt. Some serious, some comical. This one was one of my favorites…

I looked past Henry in disbelief as he turned to hand me the rifle. “If you do not shoot him, I will.”
“We don’t have any bullets, or I would seriously consider it.” He laughed and pulled a gleaming .45-70 from his shirt pocket and held it up. “Where did you get that?”
“Off your desk, where do you think?”
I pulled the handle and opened my door. “We’re trying to keep somebody from shooting him.”
He stated out the other side. “I am beginning to question the logic in that.”

Which brings me to my comparison between the books and the TV series. Honestly, I love them both. There are characters that are in both. Some are similar and some have been changed slightly to fit the TV series. The descriptions of the characters aren't quite the same in some instances, but that didn't bother me at all. I will admit that even though I liked Craig Johnson's descriptions, I found myself picturing the TV characters in my head as I read the book. What can I say, I was introduced to them first. :) One thing that bothers me in reading written dialogue on a regular basis is the lack of contractions. It just seems so formal in normal conversation to not use them. In a strange way Henry's lack of contraction use made me smile. Not only did Walt mention the fact but that's exactly how the character on the TV series talks as well. There's also a strong spiritual aspect that I enjoy in both the book and the TV series. Sometimes familiarity is a good thing. As far as the story line goes, at least for the first book, you may think you know how the story's going to pan out if you've watched the series, but the book takes a totally different slant, which I enjoyed. It kept me on my toes and it allows me to watch and read and not have either outcome spoiled. It's the little things really. ;)

So, my obvious advice to those of you who have either watched or read about Walt Longmire, treat yourself to both. I don’t watch a lot of TV, but when I find a show I like, I have no problem telling people about it. Reading the book is a no brainer. I can’t wait to pick up the rest of the series.
Gholbithris
THE COLD DISH is the first in the LONGMIRE series. It's quite a bit different than the TV series.

First off, Walt is kind of a goofball, and Vic tolerates him more than respects him. That's probably not the case, but she calls him names like fat****. That would ordinarily get you fired in most sheriff's offices.

Henry is also bigger and seems to be a very good shot with a Sharp's rifle, the murder weapon in Walt's most recent case. Somebody is shooting four boys who were tried for raping Henry's niece, Melissa Little Bird. They were found guilty, but the judge gave them limited sentences in juvenile facilities.

Whoever is killing the boys is shooting them at a very long distance, 500 yards. Walt could make that shot, as could Henry, and Melissa's father. Lonnie, who's missing his legs, and Omar, a Buffalo Bill like character who's an expert on the Sharp's rifle.

In the middle of the book there's a kind of surprise. Walt is reflecting on his life—he's met a woman, Vonnie, who seems very interested in a relationship. Then there's the surprise. Martha, Walt's deceased wife, didn't really love him. Walt stuck it out because of his daughter, who is now a lawyer who doesn't call her father often enough. I don't remember hearing that in the TV series. Vic is also enduring an unhappy marriage, and she cares about Walt more than she lets on.

There are some interesting minor characters: Lucian, the old sheriff, is living in a senior citizen's home. Walt plays chess with him once a week. In this book, Walt hires Lucian as a dispatcher for two days a week. He's an old-time western sheriff who sort of made his own rules as a case progressed, but Walt respects him and leans on him for advice. Turk is Lucian's nephew, an announced candidate for sheriff after Walt retires. Walt wants Vic to take his place.

THE COLD DISH is just another instance of the book being better than the TV show. Walt has a sense of humor in the book. He also has a great deal of respect for Native American spirituality. There's a scene where Henry is wounded and Walt has to carry him back to safety in the middle of a blizzard. He almost freezes to death. He hears bells and sees ghostlike Cheyenne Indians who lead him out of danger, left with frost bitten ears and hands. You might want to read this section twice. I had no idea what was going on. Somewhere in there Vic was also coming to his aid.

You won't be able to guess who killed those boys. But I'll give you a hint: remember the old adage, “It's always the one you least expect.”