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e-Book The Peking Target epub download

e-Book The Peking Target epub download

Author: Adam Hall
ISBN: 0872237559
Pages: 280 pages
Publisher: Playboy Enterprises Inc; 1st edition (January 1, 1982)
Language: English
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Size ePUB: 1533 kb
Size Fb2: 1631 kb
Size DJVU: 1501 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 639
Format: lrf lit mobi mbr
Subcategory: Mystery

e-Book The Peking Target epub download

by Adam Hall



ADAM HALL The Pekin Target 1: Limbo For a moment I thought I saw a face; then it was gone. Chandler, standing beside me, hadn't spoken a word for ten minutes

ADAM HALL The Pekin Target 1: Limbo For a moment I thought I saw a face; then it was gone. Chandler, standing beside me, hadn't spoken a word for ten minutes. No one ha. he smell of the river came on the night air, bland and rotten. We went on watching, and I glimpsed a black wet fin disturbing the surface not far from the bank. For a moment I thought I saw a face; then it was gone. No one had. The smell of the river came on the night air, bland and rotten.

Quiller Book Ten. Adam Hall. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Chandler, standing beside me, hadn’t spoken a word for ten minutes. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

ADAM HALL The Pekin Target 1: Limbo For a moment I thought I saw a face; then it was gone. Bubbles popped in the soft light of the lamps, tracing a regular pattern.

The Peking Target book. He also wrote under the pseudonyms of Adam Hall, Simon Rattray, Mansell Black, Trevor Burgess, Roger Fitzalan, Howard North, Warwick Scott, Caesar Smith, and Lesley Stone

The Peking Target book. He also wrote under the pseudonyms of Adam Hall, Simon Rattray, Mansell Black, Trevor Burgess, Roger Fitzalan, Howard North, Warwick Scott, Caesar Smith, and Lesley Stone. Even though he wrote thrillers, mysteries, plays, juvenile novels, and short stories, his best-known works are The Flight of the Phoenix written as Elleston Trevor and the series about British secret agent Quiller written as Adam Hall.

In Peking ( Pekin in British usage) the crowds gather for the funeral of the Chinese Premier. Quiller reports it: The British delegates formed a short line along the side of the catafalque as their leader placed the Queen’s wreath carefully against it; then suddenly the sky was filled with flowers and the bloodied body of the Secretary of State was hurled against me by the blast as the coffin exploded.

A Fast, Thrilling Read Despite Unusually Fanciful Plot. com User, April 20, 2005. From its earliest pages, "The Peking Target" moves at a brilliantly quick pace, never dropping its rigorous level of taut suspense; never allowing grumpy old Quiller the chance of remaining safe for very long.

Soon, however, the violence quickly escalates: the secretary is blown up at the funeral; another British agent dies; Quiller fends off assassins left and right; the US ambassador is killed.

Under the name "Adam Hall," he also wrote The Volcanoes of San Domingo about a mysterious plane crash off the coast of San Domingo and the efforts . The Pekin Target (1981); published in the . as The Peking Target (1982). Northlight (1985); published in the .

Under the name "Adam Hall," he also wrote The Volcanoes of San Domingo about a mysterious plane crash off the coast of San Domingo and the efforts to uncover what really happened. When alerted by a report indicating that one of the crew members had been seen alive, "Rayner," an employee of the airline, is sent to investigate. He also wrote children's books about the character "Wumpus", a koala, and his friends, including Flip Flap, the penguin. Quiller's Run (1988).

After the murder of a colleague, Quiller, a seasoned espionage agent, poses as the Secretary of State's bodyguard on a visit to China in order to flush out the killers
Rleyistr
If there's a book in the series that might be a big screen hit with the kids, it's this one.

Never mind all the explosions and, yes a helicopter chase...it's what Q is up against this time:

The supernatural.

At least near enough, in the personal and organizational capabilities of an nth-degree Dan scion of an ancient Triad, where his family's welfare is concerned. Enough to push the world off its axis, which is beginning to be the issue, as a body count of oblivious world figures is being created in order to...

Well, that's for our hero to figure out, and report on, if he can make it, literally, to the mountaintop.

The chapter covering the multi-way-communications there, via shortwave, is worth a class at Langley, say, or wherever, but presumably they have the whole Hall set by now.
Insanity
I've been a reader all my life, 60 years now, and Hall is my favorite writer- hands down. Quiller is my favorite character, followed by Marlowe and Reacher.
Vosho
From its earliest pages, "The Peking Target" moves at a brilliantly quick pace, never dropping its rigorous level of taut suspense; never allowing grumpy old Quiller the chance of remaining safe for very long. This tenth adventure in Elleston Trevor's (or "Adam Hall's") series is something of a continuation of the previous "Scorpion Signal" by revisiting a conflict between Quiller and his, now seemingly regular, "operator" Croder (really it's the same tension we had earlier between Quiller and Loman and, in one case, with Parkis), though there is little else in terms of continuity that would keep readers from enjoying this entry on its own. Occasionally though, to avid readers of the series, "Peking Target" may seem to sample scenes and elements from previous novels, or evoke similar ideas. There is a moderate leaning at times on scenes in the somewhat-flawed "Kobra Manifesto", for instance, making one wonder if Trevor isn't looking to revisit the material to try to get it right the second time within this new context.

The clandestine "terrorist" aspect is certainly better thought out than in "Manifesto", at least at first. Trevor uncannily describes a new sort of fanatical religious group who value the overwrought spectacle of "bizarre" public attacks over standard means of political assassination. The group decapitates those it sees as traitorous and their spiritual leader, Tung Kuo-feng hides in exile on a remote mountaintop, where he dictates their plans. The story though eventually turns in another direction that moots further comparison to Al Qaeda. The character "Spur", like the villains of the previous two novels, is appealing because of his disturbing similarities to Quiller. They are all, in a sense, Quiller looking at himself in the future and not liking what he sees. One surprising though confounding addition, readers will have to decide for themselves where Trevor was going with this, is Helen De Haven. It's interesting for Quiller to meet a female equal (similar to the frustratingly abandoned Helda of "Striker Portfolio"), but it becomes debatable whether her character's inclusion is ultimately necessary.

After one has finished reading "Peking Target's" final chapters, it becomes clear in afterthought that some motivations, some events, especially near the end, are ultimately preposterous. This isn't to say that it approaches the improbabilities of Bond, but rather that for the realism promised by the best Quiller entries, we have, on closer inspection, a pretty dubious series of events. Though with Trevor working at his cinematic best and everything at least seeming credible, it may be advisable to suspend all doubts and simply enjoy the ride.
Burgas
No other author of spy novels created a spy like Quiller. When it comes to portraying the life of a spy in action, Hall hits home on many levels. Yes, it is fiction. Yes, it does not portray spying as it functions on a daily basis. But when an agent gets into situations which are life threatening, Adam Hall has an uncanny knack for describing emotionally and physically what an agent goes through in confronting what he has to face and do. I have read every one of the Quiller novels at least a half dozen times, and several of them close to a dozen times. Hall ranks with Graham Greene, Len Deighton and Le Carre. Quiller ranks with Harry Palmer and Bond, James Bond. The Quiller Memorandum, the book not the horrible movie, is one of the best espionage thrillers ever written. Read all of the Quiller novels.