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e-Book AESCHYLUS: AGAMEMNON epub download

e-Book AESCHYLUS: AGAMEMNON epub download

Author: John Dewar Edited by the Late and Denys Page Denniston
ISBN: 0521874513
Publisher: Clarendon Press; 1st edition (1968)
Size ePUB: 1310 kb
Size Fb2: 1443 kb
Size DJVU: 1148 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 625
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e-Book AESCHYLUS: AGAMEMNON epub download

by John Dewar Edited by the Late and Denys Page Denniston



John Dewar Denniston (4 March 1887 in India – 2 May 1949 in Church . His parents were James Lawson Denniston, of the Indian Civil Service, and Agnes Guthrie.

John Dewar Denniston (4 March 1887 in India – 2 May 1949 in Church Stretton) was a British classical scholar. He was educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford He was Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford from 1913 until his death. Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum.

History and the Homeric Iliad, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1959.

Sir Denys Lionel Page, FBA (11 May 1908, Reading, Berkshire – 6 July 1978, Tarset) was a British classical scholar at Oxford and Cambridge universities. History and the Homeric Iliad, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1959. Poetae Melici Graeci; Alcmanis, Stesichori, Ibyci, Anacreontis, Simonidis, Corinnae, poetarum minorum reliquias, carmina popularia et convivialia quaeque adespota feruntur, Oxford 1962-listed in scholarly sources as PMG with numbers denoting fragments of lyric verse.

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal.

Herington, John, Aeschylus, Hermes Books, New Haven: Yale University . The Homeric poems specifically locate the murder of Agamemnon in Mycenae.

Herington, John, Aeschylus, Hermes Books, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986. The Author of the Prometheus Bound, Austin and London: University of Texas Press, 1970. Sheppard, John . Aeschylus and Sophocles, New York: Longmans, Greene, 1927; G. G. Harrap, 1927. Smyth, Herbert Weir, Aeschylean Tragedy, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1924. Solmsen, Friedrich, Hesiod and Aeschylus, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1949.

Aeschylus Agamemnon book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. John Dewar Denniston.

William M. Calder,, "Aeschylus: "Agamemnon"

William M. Calder,, "Aeschylus: "Agamemnon". John Dewar Denniston, Denys Page," Classical Philology 54, no. 2 (Ap. 1959): 137-139. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Carthage and Rome: Introduction. The Pupula Duplex and Other Tokens of an "Evil Eye" in the Light of Ophthalmology. Hercules, Mummius, and the Roman Triumph in Aeneid 8. Loar.

They take issue with Fraenkel on a number of points while acknowledging his immense erudition. In Shakespeare's play, Agamemnon is portrayed as a reasonable and competent king who is frustrated at the length of the war, is repulsed by Achilles's vanity, and shows reasonable strength in diplomacy. Onto the material at hand.

John Dewar Denniston. Greek Prose Style (1952). John Dewar Denniston (born 4 March 1887 in India, died 2 May 1949 in Church Stretton) was a British classical scholar. He was educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford. Category:1887 births Category:1949 deaths Category:British classical scholars Category:Fellows of Hertford College, Oxford Category:Classical scholars of the University of Oxford.

The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify and manage the documents in their possession.

Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum. Oxford Univdersity Calendar 1913, Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1913. The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify and manage the documents in their possession.

Denniston's is one of the great commentaries on this difficult Greek text. The Greek is carefully edited, then followed by the thorough commentary.
Grokinos
These books are great for students studying the Greek Tragedies in English for the first time. They are similar to No Fear Shakespeare books in that they have a page of info opposite every page of text. The info amounts to detailed notes, not translation. The translation itself seems to be aimed more at clarity than clarity and style. Of course, the Chicago Press/Lattimore and Grene translations are far better written and truer to poetic meter, but these translations are a bit easier to understand for the first time reader. Unfortunately, the series does not seem to have all of the extant Greek plays. Agamemnon seems to be the only one from the Orestia, or Aeschylus for that matter. There are several titles available from Euripides and Sophocles, however. I would highly recommend them.
Velan
[Note: This edition is a text in ANCIENT GREEK with notes in English. It has no text in English if you are looking for one. There are many to recommend. The best translation of the Oresteia, of which this work is the first part, is in Tony Harrison's Collected Works; the worst, in my opinion at least, was written by Ted Hughes. All the rest are good.]
This is a superb edition with one caveat. At the moment, educated consensus generally holds that a line of poetry seldom has one meaning. Denniston and Page's text plus commentary of Agamemnon apparently was written before this consensus formed. Denniston and Page are feisty, dogmatic, and insistent that they are right, and are largely reacting to Fraenkel's massive text plus commentary to the same play. They take issue with Fraenkel on a number of points while acknowledging his immense erudition. I have no reservations, however, recommending this edition. It was very useful and well-thought out. I give it a high rating.
Mogelv
VERY watered down version of the original but at least gives the bones of the story to readers who might not understand it otherwise..
Saberblade
I was quite disappointed when I opened this book and found the contents of the pages to be utter gibberish to me. This text is NOT in English. However, this is VERY misleading because when you preview the first few pages of the book it IS in the English version...so I bought this book thinking that it would be something completely different than it is. Good thing it was only 7 dollars. Complete waste of money and very misleading and dishonest.
Kajishakar
I always liked Homer and Sophocles, but I still have a preference for Aeschylus. What makes "Agamemnon" such a great story is that not only is this a story in itself, but it is only part 1 of a trilogy. Part 2 is "The Libation Bearers" and Part 3 is "The Eumenides." Now "Agamemnon" was written centuries before Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida." Nevertheless, the events of "Agamemnon" take place after Shakespeare's play. If you read that play of Shakespeare's, you know that it covers the last few stages of the Trojan War. In Shakespeare's play, Agamemnon is portrayed as a reasonable and competent king who is frustrated at the length of the war, is repulsed by Achilles's vanity, and shows reasonable strength in diplomacy.

Onto the material at hand. The chorus is basically a group of older men who can comment on situations, but can not really interfere. The chorus tells us that Troy has fallen, and Greece is triumphant. We then meet Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra. She blames Agamemnon for the death of her child Iphigenia. So, she naturally wants to kill Agamemnon. The chorus seems to admit that it was strange that the war was fought over Helen who was a willing prisoner. Nevertheless, the chorus sides with Agamemnon when he arrives. Asimov seems to point an interesting angle out: "Such a keen sense of honor is often praised by those who are safe at home." But of course, it is a different story to those who are involved! But of course, any time romance is involved, the voice of reason tends to take a back seat.

Moving on, Agamemnon seems to be a good king in showing his piety in the light of victory. But there is one flaw. He has kidnapped Hector's sister Cassandra. (She was the virgin priestess to Apollo, and that would be the equivalent of kidnapping a nun for pleasure.) Cassandra has the gift of prophecy, but because she tried to run with Apollo's gift 'without paying for it,' Apollo cursed her in that no one would believe her prophecies.

Showing reason, she curses Paris for starting the war with his utterly stupid kidnapping of Helen. She also tells of how Orestes will avenge his father and kill Clytemnestra (in Part 2). But back to the main plot. Clytemnestra plays the devil, and uses Agamemnon's vanity against him which leads to his death. (How disturbing that vanity was the downfall of many men centuries ago, and still is!)

In comes Clytemnestra's lover Aegisthus. He talks of the crimes of Agamemnon's father against his father. What happened was Aegisthus 's father slept with Agamemnon's father's wife. In revenge, Agamemnon's father tricked Aegisthus's father into eating the flesh of his own son. the theme of revenge is further emphasized. It is of course a never ending circle. Though I do find it interesting that Aegisthus finds it fit that Agamemnon should suffer for the crimes of his father. (Yet was Aegisthus's father who started it!)

So, Aegisthus and Clytemnestra can be together for now. But of course in Part 2, we know that they will get their comeuppance. Overall, it's a great story that emphasizes the evils and seeming eternity of revenge.
Lynnak
It would be good to have two years of college Greek behind you before starting on Denniston and Page's AGAMEMNON, a Greek text with modern commentary. As a single-volume edition for students, this one could not be bettered: everything is explained and difficult passages are translated in the notes -- about three lines a page are difficult enough to require this treatment. And I mean difficult for everyone, the world's greatest Greek scholars included. The difficulties are very thoroughly discussed. Another reviewer here has said Denniston and Page are dogmatic; not at all: they point out where passages are unclear, disagreed about by scholars, or outright lost. Most of the choruses contain passages so distorted scholars have to guess at what was written, and (assuming their guess is right) exactly what the passages mean. Aeschylus writes a little like Shakespeare in MACBETH: very poetically and not always clearly. In spite of all this, passages, sometimes quite long, of powerful poetry leap out of the page. The play has been compared to KING LEAR and called, along with LEAR, one of the two best tragedies of all time. What's more, it makes you feel, even with Denniston and Page's constant help, that you can really understand Greek if you can understand lines from this play.