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e-Book You Don't Always Get What You Pay For: The Economics of Privatization (A Century Foundation Book) epub download

e-Book You Don't Always Get What You Pay For: The Economics of Privatization (A Century Foundation Book) epub download

Author: Elliott D. Sclar,Richard C. Leone
ISBN: 0801487625
Pages: 208 pages
Publisher: Cornell University Press (November 29, 2001)
Language: English
Category: Business & Finance
Size ePUB: 1319 kb
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Rating: 4.2
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e-Book You Don't Always Get What You Pay For: The Economics of Privatization (A Century Foundation Book) epub download

by Elliott D. Sclar,Richard C. Leone



How to describe You Don't Always Get What You Pay For―as practical assessment anchored by theory, or as. .

How to describe You Don't Always Get What You Pay For―as practical assessment anchored by theory, or as theory enriched by real-world examples? From either angle, Elliott Sclar freshens and deepens an important debate. John D. Donahue, Harvard University, author of The Privatization Decision). It provides a good backdrop for the analysis of alternative privatization schemes, while using anectodes to make the point. 8 people found this helpful.

the case for privatization.

In You Don't Always Get What You Pay For, Elliott D. Sclar offers a balanced look at the pitfalls and promises of public sector privatization in the United States. By describing the underlying economic dynamics of how public agencies and private organizations actually work together, he provides a rigorous analysis of the assumptions behind the case for privatization. The competitive-market model may seem appealing, but Sclar warns that it does not address the complex reality of contracting for government services.

Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics Volume 4, No. 4 (Winter 2001). Peter T. Calcagno is Professor of Economics at the College of Charleston.

Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. GET NEWS AND ARTICLES IN YOUR INBOX Print. Volume 4, No. Elliot Sclar's book You Don't Always Get What You Pay For: The Economics of Privatization presents an empirical analysis of privatization that he thinks has been lacking. He uses several case studies to explain the merits and downfalls of trying to privatize "public services. After examining several case studies he concludes the privately producing "publicly provided goods" is not always beneficial to society. Author: Contact Peter T. Calcagno.

In his book, Elliott Sclar takes complex obtuse economic theories and makes them comprehensible for the rest of us. He adds a new element to the on-going debate on privitization. A must read for anyone new to the field and even those who are already in it. It is even a fairly interesting read for those in no way affiliated with the field. Sclar Makes It Seem So Easy. Published by Thriftbooks

Proponents of privatization argue that private firms will respond to competitive market pressures and provide better service at lower . A Century Foundation Book. Winner of Winner of the 2000 Louis Brownlow Gifts Book Award Nati.

Proponents of privatization argue that private firms will respond to competitive market pressures and provide better service at lower cost. While this assertion has caused much controversy, the debate between both sides has consisted mainly of impassioned defenses of entrenched positions. In You Don't Always Get What You Pay For, Elliott D. Foreword by. Richard C. Leone.

Century Foundation Books (Cornell Paperback). Cornell University Press.

Category: Economics, Business & Investing, Popular Economics, Politics, Nonfiction.

The Economics of Privatization (Century Foundation Books (Cornell Paperback)). Published December 2001 by Cornell University Press. The dawning of the twentieth century brought a widespread belief in the power of government to serve as an agent of positive social change.

Elliott Sclar offers a balanced look at the pitfalls and promises of public sector privatization in the United States. 2001, 208 pages, 6 x 9, 12 tables ISBN: 978-0-8014-8762-0. By describing the underlying economic dynamics of how public agencies and private organizations work together, he provides a rigorous analysis of the assumptions behind the case for privatization.

Elliott D. Sclar, Professor of Urban Planning & Public Affairs, Columbia University. The Political & Economic Context for the Book. Prepared for PRMPO & SDV, World Bank, Washington DC. Wednesday, February 27, 2002. Privatization is the rubric for the series of public policies that emerged that were intended to deregulate industries and bring more private sector participation into the delivery of public goods. My Findings and Response. My experience: A disjuncture between theory and practice.

Today, nearly all public services―schools, hospitals, prisons, fire departments, sanitation―are considered fair game for privatization. Proponents of privatization argue that private firms will respond to competitive market pressures and provide better service at lower cost. While this assertion has caused much controversy, the debate between both sides has consisted mainly of impassioned defenses of entrenched positions. In You Don't Always Get What You Pay For, Elliott D. Sclar offers a balanced look at the pitfalls and promises of public sector privatization in the United States. By describing the underlying economic dynamics of how public agencies and private organizations actually work together, he provides a rigorous analysis of the assumptions behind the case for privatization.The competitive-market model may seem appealing, but Sclar warns that it does not address the complex reality of contracting for government services. Using specific examples, such as mail service and urban transportation, he shows that ironically privatization does not shrink government―the broader goal of many of its own champions. He also demonstrates that there is more to consider in providing public services than trying to achieve efficiency; there are issues of equity and access that cannot be ignored.Sclar believes that public officials and voters will soon realize the limitations of "contracting out" just as private corporations have come to understand the drawbacks of outsourcing. After examining the effectiveness of alternatives to privatization, he offers suggestions for improving public sector performance―advice he hopes will be heeded before it is too late.
Damand
Very imprtant book which everyone should read. I think government should be smaller but this book gives case studies which clearly show why it is important for government to do some things. Very detailed so should not be considered "light" reading.
Quphagie
The author does a fantastic job debunking privatization in all cases. He is particularly effective when providing personal examples (a local post office) and case studies, such as his analysis of a Midwestern state's embrace of privatization. However, the case study, captured in the book's final chapters, mitigates the author's claims that privatization is always negative for taxpayers and residents. Had the city not allowed outsiders the opportunity to bid on contracts, the local union would have remained entrenched and would not have adapted and improved services. One of the most compelling lessons, which the author seems to gloss over, is the unnecessariness of middle managers in *any* enterprise. Overall, an excellent read. (February 2018)
Hrguig
Read an excellent, gripping history of an early example of privatization in the U.S.:
"The Great Railroad Conspiracy: the social history of a railroad war, by Charles Hirtzman. Here's a review:

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, gripping history of corporate battle against citizens in 1850's January 9, 2011
By Joseph J. Sheehan

Format:Hardcover|Amazon Verified Purchase

An outstanding book providing a detailed, riveting account of a "war" in the 1840's and 1850's between Michigan citizens and a railroad foolishly granted a monopoly by the Michigan legislature. A chilling account of what may be one of the earliest examples of "privatization" in America--Michigan lacked the funds to complete the railroad and so turned it over to a private corporation. What follows is extraordinary intrigue, political corruption, and outrageous corporate abuse, including bribing of judges, bringing false criminal charges against railroad opponents based on perjury of hired "spies" for the railroad, and more--including an incident reminiscent of the burning of the Reichstag. Should be mandatory reading for any class in U.S. History. Extremely well written, gripping, impossible to put down--the incredible facts unfold in more exciting fashion than any fiction thriller. Extremely highly recommended.
Tori Texer
This is an excellently-written critique of privatization. In case after case, Sclar reveals that all is not as it might seem, and that beneath the apparition of improved efficiency lies a different reality supporters of privatization might not want revealed.
The book does not tell the whole story. Sclar has long been a critic of privatization, and he frankly doesn't highlight the successes of privatization -- and these certainly do exist. I don't really think there is a case to be made specifically "for privatization" or "anti-privatization," but a requirement for more balanced analysis, which has not been present in the output of privatization advocates. There is also a need to examine ways that the public sector can be made more efficient without necessarily bringing in a privatization approach.
Sclar provides a valuable service in laying out a series of critical paths in an uncommonly well-written text, and prompts readers to ask the difficult questions. Well worth reading. If you are specifically interested in public transportation, also take a look at my new book -- The Private Provision of Public Transport -- available through Amazon.
Cyregaehus
This book is fantastic for several reasons. The book's policy relevance is global and has only increased in the years since Sclar wrote it. Armed with a solid body of evidence, Sclar confronts and debunks the preposterous, faith-based propaganda with which proponents of privatisation impose market discipline on public services. Another wonderful thing is that Sclar writes in plain English rather than in the verbose, distracting, abstract dialect that many scholars tend to use, so Sclar's points are clear, powerful, and comprehensible to the general public. This book is a tremendous asset for those who advocate public control and provision of essential services.
Vushura
This is a well rounded review of the privatization of government. It provides a good backdrop for the analysis of alternative privatization schemes, while using anectodes to make the point.