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e-Book Migrant Remittances and Low-Income Households in Sri Lanka: Development Policy Issues (Working Papers on South Asia) epub download

e-Book Migrant Remittances and Low-Income Households in Sri Lanka: Development Policy Issues (Working Papers on South Asia) epub download

Author: Judith Shaw
ISBN: 1876924683
Pages: 36 pages
Publisher: Monash Asia Institute (December 31, 2008)
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Size ePUB: 1154 kb
Size Fb2: 1354 kb
Size DJVU: 1434 kb
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e-Book Migrant Remittances and Low-Income Households in Sri Lanka: Development Policy Issues (Working Papers on South Asia) epub download

by Judith Shaw



In many developing countries, remittances from workers who have migrated elsewhere have expanded in the last .

In many developing countries, remittances from workers who have migrated elsewhere have expanded in the last three decades to become a key balance of payments. In response to their growing economic significance, there has been increasing policy interest i. Get A Copy. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

inflows of money to Sri Lanka from the Sri Lankans who live and work abroad, mainly in the Middle. East, Europe, and South East Asia have made foreign remittances an important part of the Sri Lankan. Figure 1 Trends of Foreign Remittance Inflows to Sri Lanka. Source: - Central Bank Annual Reports, 1990 - 2013. Almost one of four households in Sri Lanka has foreign remittance income, which makes Sri. Lanka more dependent on foreign remittances than any other South Asian countries.

Remittances-money sent home by immigrant workers abroad-are . It discusses some of the key issues relating to the remittance industry in Sri Lanka.

Remittances-money sent home by immigrant workers abroad-are hugely beneficial to Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka is one of three countries in Asia, along with the Philippines and Indonesia, where women migrants constitute between . Migrant remittances and low income households in Sri Lanka: Development policy issues. Working Paper No. 9. Melbourne: Monash Asia Institute.

Sri Lanka is one of three countries in Asia, along with the Philippines and Indonesia, where women migrants constitute between 60 and 70% of legal migrants; these female migrants are mainly employed overseas as domestic workers. Since the 1980s, the out-migration of Sri Lankan females for employment abroad surpassed that of males and the major destination has been countries in the Middle East. Migration as a livelihood strategy of the poor: The Bangladesh case.

South Asia Regional Office. Finance and Private Sector Development Unit. Migrant remittances and low-income households in Sri Lanka : development policy issues, Judith Shaw. Sri Lanka's migrant labor remittances : enhancing the quality and outreach of the rural remittnce infrastructure.

The UNECE Working Paper Series on Statistics consists of studies . UNECE Working Paper Series on Statistics, Issue 4, June 2018.

The UNECE Working Paper Series on Statistics consists of studies prepared by leading experts in official statistics from the UNECE region. Analysis of Household Surveys on Migration and Remittances in the Countries of Eastern Europe, Caucasus, and Central Asia. Prepared for UNECE by Anna Prokhorova. The flow of money transferred by labour migrants to their households in the homeland became an inseparable component of the discourse concerning migration and development.

Remittance in South Asia 9 A. Trends 9 B. Remittance Policies 11 C. Issues in South Asia Remittances 13 II. Issues in South Asia Remittances 13 III. Formal Remittance Infrastructure in South Asia 14 A. General Mechanism of Remittances 14 B. Formal Financial Sector Infrastructure for Remittance 16 C. Issues in Formal Remittance Infrastructure 18 I. South Asian countries send out a significant number of migrant workers annually and remittances sent by migrant workers become a significant source of funds for economic development of the countries.

Lower-income households are more price sensitive and report that healthful food is often unaffordable and thus not .

From: Environmental Nutrition, 2019. Another study using the case study of Brazil examine to what extent the country has reduced hunger and food and nutrition insecurity.

Bangladesh and Sri Lanka also have remittances between 9–10 per cent of. .

Bangladesh and Sri Lanka also have remittances between 9–10 per cent of GDP. While India receives the largest volume of remittances, it forms only . per cent of GDP in India. Predominance of semi–skilled and low–skilled migrant workers Most migrant workers from South Asia to Middle East and other Asian destinations are low–skilled or semi–skilled, such as construction workers and female domestic workers. This phenomenon is a major cause of protection and vulnerability in both origin and destination countries.

Challenging Remittances as the New Development Mantra: Perspectives from Low-Paid Migrant Workers in London.

Challenging Remittances as the New Development Mantra: Perspectives from Low-Paid Migrant Workers in London. Deans, . L. Lonnqvist, and K. Sen. 2006. Remittances and Migration: Some Policy Considerations for NGOs. Devadoss, . and J. Foltz.

In many developing countries, remittances from workers who have migrated elsewhere have expanded in the last three decades to become a key balance of payments. In response to their growing economic significance, there has been increasing policy interest in harnessing remittances as a resource for macroeconomic and regional development, but few studies give detailed consideration to migrant workers and their families from a development policy perspective. Sri Lanka, a small low-income country, sends large numbers of workers into overseas labor markets. This working paper contributes to the building of a development policy framework by focusing on the main issues which affect remittance flows to households and the expenditure decisions of recipients in Sri Lanka. The study recommends appropriate corrective measures.