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e-Book Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry (Traditional African literature) epub download

e-Book Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry (Traditional African literature) epub download

Author: Kofi Awoonor
ISBN: 0883570076
Pages: 104 pages
Publisher: Nok Pub Intl (June 1, 1974)
Language: English
Size ePUB: 1312 kb
Size Fb2: 1223 kb
Size DJVU: 1211 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 541
Format: mbr docx lrf lrf
Subcategory: Other

e-Book Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry (Traditional African literature) epub download

by Kofi Awoonor



Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry, 1973) The Breast of the Earth: A Survey of the History, Culture, and Literature of Africa South of the Sahara (1975), Anchor Press.

His early works were inspired by the singing and verse of his native Ewe people, and he later published translations of the work of three Ewe dirge singers (Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry, 1973). Awoonor managed the Ghana Film Corporation and helped to found the Ghana Playhouse, going on to have a significant role in developing theatre and drama. Awoonor returned to Ghana in 1975 as head of the English department at the University of Cape Coast. The Breast of the Earth: A Survey of the History, Culture, and Literature of Africa South of the Sahara (1975), Anchor Press

Kofi Awoonor obituary

Kofi Awoonor obituary. Leading Ghanaian poet, novelist and political activist whose work was firmly rooted in the traditions of the Ewe people. The African poet and novelist Kofi Awoonor has died aged 78 in the terrorist attack by al-Shabaab militants at the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi. His work was deeply rooted in the poetic and mythic traditions of the Ewe people in Ghana.

Professor Kofi Awoonor was among those who were killed in the September 2013 attack at Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, by the al-Shabaab Kofi Awoonor was a Ghanaian poet and author whose work combined the poetic traditions of his native Ewe people and contemporary and religious symbolism to depict Africa during decolonization. He started writing under the name George Awoonor-Williams.

Kofi Awoonor was not just a prominent African poet; he was one of those . The debt African poetry owes Kofi Awoonor is huge and many-sided.

Kofi Awoonor was not just a prominent African poet; he was one of those pioneers of the art that showed succeeding generations the best way it is done. And he did all this without stealing the fire from the forge of the traditional poets; without striving to override his indigenous benefactors. As the Yoruba would say, Kofi m’o woo we, o ba’gba je (Kofi knew how to wash his hands; so he ate with the elders). Kofi Anyidoho (who was lucky to have been a hunter in the same cultural/linguistic forest as Kofi Awoonor) would bear me out.

By (author) Kofi Awoonor. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

He translated Ewe poetry in his critical study Guardians of the Sacred Word and Ewe Poetry (1974). In the early 1970s, Awoonor served as chairman of the Department of Comparative Literature at SUNY Stony Book. Other works of literary criticism include The Breast of the Earth: A Survey of the History, Culture, and Literature of Africa South of the Sahara (1975). He returned to Ghana in 1975 to teach at University College of Cape Coast. In Ghana, he was arrested and tried for suspected involvement in a coup.

Kofi Awoonor was a Ghanaian poet and author whose work combined the poetic .

Kofi Awoonor was a Ghanaian poet and author whose work combined the poetic traditions of his native Ewe people and contemporary. He was a paternal descendant of the Awoonor-Williams family of

"Kofi Awoonor's new book The Promise of Hope: New and selected . He taught African literature at the Kofi Nyidevu Awoonor and was also published as. Categories.

"Kofi Awoonor's new book The Promise of Hope: New and selected poems". Retrieved 2013-09-27. Being such a strong and avid practitioner of the traditional religion meant that he was of a relict species. Especially for one so highly educated, it was an even rarer phenomenon.

Place and experience of displacement are both important features of African literature. It originated against the background of a complex history of colonisation and decolonisation

Anna Cottrell Once upon a Time in Ghana: Traditional Ewe Stories Retold in English. Guardians of the Sacred Word: Ewe Poetry (Traditional African literature).

Anna Cottrell Once upon a Time in Ghana: Traditional Ewe Stories Retold in English. Emmanuel V. Asihene Traditional Folk-Tales of Ghana (Studies in African Literature). Eric A. Kimmel Anansi and the Talking Melon. James Culver Jr. Why Anansi Never Fails! 10 Original Stories for Winning the Learning Game! John Biggers Ananse the Web of Life in Africa. The descent of anansi.

Book by Awoonor, Kofi