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e-Book The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People epub download

e-Book The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People epub download

Author: Neil Shubin
ISBN: 0307378438
Pages: 240 pages
Publisher: Pantheon; 1 edition (January 8, 2013)
Language: English
Category: Science & Mathematics
Size ePUB: 1767 kb
Size Fb2: 1930 kb
Size DJVU: 1333 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 780
Format: rtf lit lit lrf
Subcategory: Other

e-Book The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People epub download

by Neil Shubin



Exposed on the eastern coast of Greenland, across the ocean from Iceland, were the perfect kinds of rocks in which to find early mammals, dinosaurs, and other scientific goodies. The maps looked exotic, even ominous.

Published in the United States by Pantheon Books, a division of Random House, In. New York, and in Canada. by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Exposed on the eastern coast of Greenland, across the ocean from Iceland, were the perfect kinds of rocks in which to find early mammals, dinosaurs, and other scientific goodies. The east coast of Greenland is remote and mountainous.

The Universe Within will change that. Neil Shubin roots around our physiology and finds the history of the cosmos lodged in our cells. And in the process, he makes the familiar wondrous. Carl Zimmer, author of Evolution: Making Sense of Life and A Planet of Viruses. Shubin’s The Universe Within is a further reminder of this critical relationshi. he Universe Within gives us an appreciation of how we are just small specks and small moments in time.

Full of surprising, yet profound insights, Neil Shubin's The Universe Within is also a celebration of. .To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Full of surprising, yet profound insights, Neil Shubin's The Universe Within is also a celebration of the humans whose curiosity and genius have, in a very short time, transformed our understanding of our ever-changing world. Sean B. Carroll, author of Remarkable Creatures This is beautiful story, beautifully told.

The Universe Within book. In The Universe Within, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, Shubin takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we look the way we do. Starting once again with fossils, he turns his gaze skyward, showing us how the entirety of the universe’s r history can be seen in our bodies.

In his last book, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy-our hands, our jaws-and . Starting once again with fossils, Shubin turns his gaze skyward.

In his last book, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy-our hands, our jaws-and the structures in the fish that first took over land 375 million years ago. Now, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, he takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we are the way we are. He shows how the entirety of the universe's 14-billion-year history can be seen in our bodies.

Neil Shubin (born December 22, 1960) is an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer. The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People. Pantheon Books, New York City 2013, ISBN 978-0-307-37843-9. He is the Robert R. Bensley Professor of Organismal Biology and Anatomy, Associate Dean of Organismal Biology and Anatomy and Professor on the Committee of Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago along with being the Provost of the Field Museum of Natural History  .

The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, & People by Neil Shubin 14:54 - 24 дек. 2019 г. 2 отметки Нравится. 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 2 отметки Нравится.

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In his last book, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy-our hands, our jaws-and the structures in the fish that first took over land 375 million years ago.

Paleontologist Neil Shubin is the kind of guy you’d like to meet at a cocktail .

Paleontologist Neil Shubin is the kind of guy you’d like to meet at a cocktail party: smart, funny, a good storyteller who can drop your jaw with scientific insights on how that jaw developed thanks to obscure creatures from other eons. Author of the bestselling Your Inner Fish, Dr. Shubin doesn’t merely explain science with clarity and humor; he unearths some of those connections in his own fieldwork.

In The Universe Within, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, Shubin takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we look the way we do. Starting once again with fossils, he turns his gaze skyward, showing us how the entirety of the universe’s. As he moves from our very molecular composition (a result of stellar events at the origin of our solar system) through the workings of our eyes, Shubin makes clear how the evolution of the cosmos has profoundly marked our own bodies.

**Kirkus Best Books of the Year (2013)**From one of our finest and most popular science writers, and the best-selling author of Your Inner Fish, comes the answer to a scientific mystery as big as the world itself: How are the events that formed our solar system billions of years ago embedded inside each of us? In Your Inner Fish, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human bodies—our hands, heads, and jaws—and the structures in fish and worms that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. In The Universe Within, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, Shubin takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we look the way we do. Starting once again with fossils, he turns his gaze skyward, showing us how the entirety of the universe’s fourteen-billion-year history can be seen in our bodies. As he moves from our very molecular composition (a result of stellar events at the origin of our solar system) through the workings of our eyes, Shubin makes clear how the evolution of the cosmos has profoundly marked our own bodies.WITH BLACK-AND-WHITE LINE DRAWINGS THROUGHOUT

Milleynti
From my list of book reviews it will be blatantly obvious that I like non-fiction, especially non-fiction science books. I therefore naturally thought that The universe within by Neil Shubin would be a perfect match. A little bit of geology mixed with astronomy and evolution combined with reportedly good writing. It felt like a safe bet for me. I was wrong.

Shubin starts out by describing a geological expedition to Greenland. It was indeed interesting to learn about the hardships associated with finding stones that were formed during the time you are interested in. Shubin quickly moves on (it is a rather short book) to state that all living creatures on earth are related to one another and then he also takes it one step further, saying that we are also related to distant stars because had it not been for supernovas of massive stars the elements on which life depends, would not have formed. This, I suppose, is a profound fact, but I guess that a few paragraphs is not sufficient to convey a feeling of awe.

The book proceeds on a wild journey through space and evolution. Shubin writes about the origin of life and about the formation of stars as well as the entire universe. He frequently diverts from the main story (if there is one) and discusses other things such as the circadian rhythm. The part I personally found most interesting was the one about earth's climate on a geological timescale. Did you know that before the Himalayas formed 40 million years ago (due to the collision of the Indian and Chinese landmasses), earth was considerably warmer than it has been since then. At some points there were not even any ice caps over Antarctica. The Himalayas, Shubin explains, drained carbon dioxide from the atmosphere which was flushed into the oceans which in turn reduced the greenhouse effect of our atmosphere which cooled earth. We should expect more such drastic changes of the earth's climate in the future and we better hope that we humans are able to adapt to such changes.

This is not a bad book but I feel that if suffers from trying to cover too broad an area in too few pages. It reminds me of when my supervisor was going to give a talk about "cognition and evolution", which he felt was already stretching what you could cram into one talk. The arrangers however felt that this was too modest, can't we change the title to cogntion, evolution, and the cosmos to raise interest? I don't know how that episode ended but I can imagine that, like this book, the result would lack focus.
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The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People by Neil Shubin

"The Universe Within" is a fun journey to what connects us to the cosmos. Professor Shubin the author of the best-selling "Your Inner Fish" provides readers with a wonderful and accessible book that connects the dots to our human origins. Using his background in paleontology and the converging knowledge from biology and physics; we end up with an enjoyable instructive book that is perfect for the layperson. This 240-page book is composed of the following ten chapters: 1.Rocking Our World, 2. Blasts from the Past, 3. Lucky Stars, 4. About Time, 5. The Ascent of Big, 6. Connecting the Dots, 7. Kings of the Hill, 8. Fever and Chills, 9. Cold Facts, and 10. Mothers of Invention.

Positives:
1. Great science writing. Professor Shubin is an excellent author who is able to convey the main points to a general audience.
2. Well-researched and engaging book. This book covers many areas of science with ease, from the big bang until the present.
3. Professor Shubin shares his firsthand adventures with readers which make for an enjoyable read.
4. Great use of illustrations, maps and photos that add value to book.
5. The main idea of this book, made plainly clear, "All the galaxies in the cosmos, like every creature on the planet, and every atom, molecule, and body on Earth are deeply connected. That connection begins at a single point 13.7 billion years ago".
6. Good explanation of how rocks tie us to the past.
7. Many great stories of scientists behind important discoveries.
8. The importance of properties of light. How chemistry evolved.
9. A little astronomy for good measure and how it relates to humans.
10. A lot of amazing tidbits interspersed throughout the narrative. "It is a virtual certainty that within the next billion years the sun will run through its hydrogen fuel, expand, and become superhot. In the process, Earth will almost certainly lose its water".
11. How to determine time...many convergences of interest. "Earth spins slower and slower with each passing moment..." Biological clocks.
12. Fossils, ancient species...the evolution of species. Fossils and rock layers.
13. The fascinating balance of oxygen between the forces that produce it and those that consume it.
14. The scientists and observations that led to plate tectonics. "Girl talk". Continental drift.
15. The discovery of extinctions.
16. The evolution of our planet. The impact of carbon dioxide. The cycle of carbon. "The rise of the Tibetan Plateau led to the shift from a warm Earth to a cold one; it did so by pulling carbon from the air via erosion of rock".
17. The "cold" hard facts. The ice age theory. The regular intervals that they occur. "Earth's orbit changes in three major ways. Over 100,000 years Earth's orbit goes from the shape of an oval to a more circular pattern. During 41,000 years Earth rocks back and forth about 2 degrees. And in the course of 19,000 years Earth's tilt wobbles like a top". The ice ages are correlated to the changing orbit, tilt, and gyration of Earth...how cool is that?
18. Human evolution. Biology and culture.
19. Further reading section. Good sources.

Negatives:
1. Did not take advantage of links in the Kindle version.
2. As wonderful as this book is it really is intended for the layperson and as a result lacks depth.
3. The book is heavily weighted in favor of geology.

In summary, this was a fun book to read. Professor Shubin is an engaging author who does a wonderful job of conveying his main ideas to the public. The book is about the thrill of the scientific hunt. In this case, it was about the hunt for discoveries that link humans to our cosmos. As wonderful as this book is, it's not in the same league as his masterpiece, "Your Inner Fish"; be that as it may, it's a solid, accessible book. If you are a layperson and want to learn what connects us all, by all means pick up this book, I highly recommend it!

Further suggestions: "Written in Stone" by Brian Switek, "Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why It Matters" by Donald R. Prothero, "Universe Inside You" by Brian Clegg, "The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code" by Sam Kean, "The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution" by Gregory Cochran, "About Time" by Adam Frank, "Deep Ancestry: Inside The Genographic Project" by Spencer Wells, "Why Evolution Is True" by Jerry A. Coyne, , "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond, "A Universe from Nothing" by Lawrence Krauss, and "Wonders of the Universe" by Brian Cox.